Health Science – Community Health Option

Posted: October 29, 2015 at 7:45 am

Public Health

Vickie Krenz, Chair McLane Hall, Room 184 559.278.4014 http://www.fresnostate.edu/publichealth

BS in Health Science - Community Health Option, B.S. BS in Health Science - Health Administration Option, B.S. BS in Health Science - Environmental/Occupational Health & Safety Option, B.S. MN in Public Health, Minor MPH in Public Health - Health Promotion Option, M.P.H.

The Bachelor of Science in Health Science and the Master of Public Health degrees are designed to prepare students for careers with official and voluntary health agencies at the federal, state, or local levels of government as well as the private sector.

The Master of Public Health degree is designed for individuals seeking a professional degree in public health. This degree is recognized throughout the world and is fully accredited by the Council of Education for Public Health (CEPH). The MPH program is under probationary accreditation until 2012.

The Department of Public Health offers curricula based on principles of public health practices leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, including a major and minor in health science with options in community health, environmental/occupational health and safety, and health administration.

The mission of the program is to prepare public health professionals for leadership roles in the fields of health policy and management and health promotion so that they may contribute to the process of improving the health of communities located within the San Joaquin Valley, California, and the southwest. This mission is fulfilled by attaining several program goals which address on a partnership basis the health needs of the ethnically and socioeconomically diverse populations living in the San Joaquin Valley and the southwest. Coursework for the Master of Public Health (MPH) is varied and designed to provide the maximum opportunity for problem-solving approaches to the complex issues in the operation, environment, and human factors confronting the health care systems.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

The course reflects both environmental and ecological perspective of waste dumping within the minority community. The course will give students an opportunity to analyze, compare and contrast differenct environmental issues facing the community and suggest methods and ways of evaluating these problems.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 99 units

National Safety Council First Responder and Emergency Care course. Priorities of care, injuries, medical emergencies, crisis intervention, and casualty incidents. Includes bleeding, shock, fractures, poisoning, emergency childbirth, CPR Certification for meeting requirements. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prepares individuals to render pre-hospital basic life support during transport or within a hospital. Upon completion, students will receive a certificate allowing them to take the National Registry test. Upon passing the test, EMT certification is granted.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

Significance of basic health problems applicable to the young adult and to society. G.E. Breadth E1.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring GE Area: E1

Physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and developmental considerations for lifelong understanding related to sexuality. G.E. Breadth E1. (Formerly H S 124)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring GE Area: E1

Prerequisites: Students must take the ELM exam; students who do not pass the exam must record a grade of C or better in a college-taught intermediate algebra course. Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as applied to evaluation and research in allied health. Central tendency and dispersion; central limit theorem; hypothesis testing; ANOVA; correlation, nonparametric methods. Interpretations of public health statistics. (3 lecturer hours)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Public health services as they affect the community; investigation and analysis of community health problems.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation and Area D. Prerequisite: PH 90. Influence of culture on health and disease; relevant health issues of cultural and ethnic groups; alternative healing and holistic health; role of international health organizations; health problems on a world scale. History and evaluation of programs of international health organizations; health problems on a world scale. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring GE Area: M/I

Human and environmental risks as they relate to injuries and illnesses; includes incident causation analysis and assessment. Areas of study encompass occupational safety, consumer products, human factors, environmental health, and human and property costs.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: PH 92 or equivalent. Modern concepts and principles of epidemiology; interaction of all agents, host, and environmental factors of communicable and noncommunicable diseases.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Examination of physical, neurological, emotional, social, and political factors affecting the use, misuse, and abuse of licit and illicit substances in contemporary American society. Applies models of addiction and compulsive behaviors to gambling, food consumption, and sexual behavior. G.E. Breadth E1.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring GE Area: E1

Physical, mental, and social factors related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages; the development of alcohol dependence.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Consumer health as it relates to selection of health care products and services; how to differentiate fact from fiction in health matters.

Units: 3

An introduction to the theory and practice of health behavior change. Covers individual behavior change methodologies and the effects of public and environmental change on individual health.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

(PH 115 same as GERON 115.) Basic principles and concepts of the aging process; includes the physical, social, emotional and mental components of health. Benefits of health promotion and preventive action for the aging are also explored.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

(PH 127 same as WS 127.) Studies on female sexuality which include past and present sexual roles, female sexual response patterns, and discussion of common problems encountered by women functioning as sexual beings.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

Explores concepts related to holistic health and alternative medicine within a cross-cultural framework. Includes a description of the physical and psychosocial effects of alternative healing; addresses the benefits and risks associated with these therapies.

Units: 3 GE Area: M/I

Health problems of rural areas including community medical services, medical facilities, federal, state, and local legislation and administrative problems.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

(PH 130 same as WS 130.) Examines current crises/ controversies in women's health care. Includes conventional/ alternatives approaches to treatment, management, and prevention with emphasis on self-care and promotion of optimum health.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall

Study of the foundations, theories, systems, and principles of health education. Includes an analysis of social, medical, and environmental factors on health-related behaviors.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

It is strongly recommended that students complete PH 114 and PH 131 prior to enrollment in PH 133. Health education program planning, implementation, and evaluation. Provides needs assessment, health education curriculum development, and presenting and evaluating a health education intervention with a client group.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Concepts and principles of disease and dysfunction of the human body. Detection, diagnosis, treatment, etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Studies the science of ergonomics as it relates to injury/illness prevention and the promotion of a quality work environment. Ergonomics is the evaluation of people and their tools, materials, and equipment in a work setting. (Formerly H S 166T)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall

Application of safety and accident prevention measures that provide a basis for insight into the hazards of occupational and industrial situations.

Units: 3

Concepts and principles dealing with the problems, processes, evaluation, and solutions in the development, implementation, and management of an effective environmental health and occupational safety program.

Units: 3

The theory and practice of managing inspection-based enforcement programs in health care and environmental health areas, with emphasis on legislation, procedure, and cases relating to public health.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall

To introduce students to the understanding of fundamental principles in "economics" that serve as the foundation of the US healthcare system.

Units: 3

Organizational design and managerial principles as they apply to the private sector of health care.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

Basic principles and concepts of toxicology with a particular emphasis on the regulation of environmental and industrial toxicants for man/woman.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

General principles of environmental health with a particular emphasis on the interaction between man/woman and the environment. Environmental epidemiology, water, wastewater, air, solid waste, ionizing radiation, and noise. Focuses on prevention and control disease and injury caused by chemicals, food protection, air/ water quality radiation, hazardous waste, et cetera.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring GE Area: IB

Basic principles and concepts of environmental health with a particular emphasis on health hazards, communicable disease control, contamination control, food protection, rodent control, managing special environments, planned environments, and environmental health organizations. (Formerly HS 162)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: PH 162A or concurrent. Problems of environmental health studied through field trips, observations, demonstrations, and seminars. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly HS 165)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

Principles of public health administration, fundamentals of organization, and administration in public health.

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Role vectors of disease play in human health. Basic principles and concepts of vector control. Particular emphasis is given to diseases vectored by arthropods and rodents.

Units: 3

Designed to provide training in the use of laboratory procedures and techniques of adjusting and operating monitoring equipment used in water quality, air pollution, noise pollution, food sanitation, radiological health, and toxic substances. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) ( Lab fee, $25)

Units: 3

Concepts of occupational health as they pertain to appraising and controlling environmental health hazards; occupational diseases, chemical, biological, and physical agents that produce organic or systemic damage. Problems in toxicology, measurement instruments, and evaluating health hazards. (Formerly HS 168)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Fall

Prerequisite: PH 168A. General principles of investigation for chemical and physical hazards commonly encountered in the occupational environment. Sampling strategies, quantitative analysis, combustible gases, organic vapors, and nonionizing radiation. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly HS 147)

Units: 3 Course Typically Offered: Spring

A descriptive analysis of air pollutants encountered in the indoor and outdoor environments with an emphasis on assessment of risk, human health effects, and a review of federal and state regulations that apply.

Units: 3

Prerequisites: completion of 21 units of the health science major (Core and Environmental Option courses). Provides practical experience in environmental health. Requires a 3.0 GPA in Health Science coursework, or permission of the instructor. Permission numbers required. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Introduction to the basic use and practical application of personal and mainframe computers in health-related professions. Laboratory use of computers covers word processing, SPSS, data entry, data management, principles of programming, and use of on-line databases. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3

Repeatable to 3 units in any one area, maximum total 6. Prerequisite: completion of 24 units of the health science major (Core and Administration Option courses). Provides practical experience in a community work setting. Requires a 3.0 GPA in Health Science coursework, or permission of the instructor. Permission numbers required. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite: completion of 24 units of the health science major (Core and Community Health option courses). Provides practical experiences in a community work setting. Requires a 3.0 GPA in Health Science coursework, or permission of instructor. Permission numbers required. CR/NC grading only. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

See Academic Placement -- [-LINK-]. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite: PH 92 or equivalent. Theories and limitations of parametric testing: ANOVA, MANOVA, and regression. Focus on nonparametric testing and small samples including Kruskal Wallis, Median and Fischer tests. Preparation of data for computer analysis and interpretation of results. Resource issues related to data collection.

Units: 3

Prerequisite: PH 100. Individual research, analysis, and evaluation in relation to educational aspects of community health programs; group procedures; community organizations; selection, development, and use of media. Field assignments are required. (Formerly HS 203)

Units: 3

Application and evaluation of environmental health principles to air, land, water, waste, and occupational health with emphasis on contemporary issues.

Units: 3

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Health Science - Community Health Option

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