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Cellular Dynamics Awarded U.S. Patent Covering Automated Production of All Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

MADISON, Wis. — Cellular Dynamics International (CDI) today announced that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) awarded the company Patent No. 8,815,585 on the automated production of human pluripotent …

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Research conducted by Irish scientists could mean the end of organ donors

New technology uses sound waves to target specific cells.

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Running man Rob fighting fit after being saved by German donor

TRANSPLANT patient Rob Allen is on top of the world just months after having a life-saving operation.

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Could Reprogrammed Cells Fight 'Untreatable' Diseases?

By Ciara Curtin

Jeanne Loring and her Scripps Research Institute colleagues transplanted a set of cells into the spinal cords of mice that had lost use of their hind limbs to multiple sclerosis. As the experimentalists expected, within a week, the mice rejected the cells. But after another week, the mice began to walk.

We thought that they wouldnt do anything, says Loring, who directs theCenter for Regenerative Medicineat Scripps. But as her lab has since shown numerous times, and published in Stem Cell Reports, something that these particular so-called neural precursor cells dobeforethe immune system kicks them out seems to make the mouse better.

The cells Lorings team used are derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, which are mature cells, such as skin cells, that have been coaxed with a combination of chemicals to return to an earlier stage of development.

Induced pluripotent cells, also known as iPS cells, pose a number of opportunities for medicine. For instance, Loring is using iPS cells from Parkinsons disease and multiple sclerosis patients to reconstitute cell types that may be damaged in people with those conditions. She is also using them to test how certain drugs or treatments may affect damaged cells in people with conditions such as autism spectrum disorders.

Loring (front row, center) with the Loring Lab Group at the Center for Regenerative Medicine

Loring says no viable long-term treatments exist for the diseases her team has been working on, including Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, and multiple sclerosis, Thats where the need is, she says.

The neural precursor cells that Loring has been using in the mice with MS are young cells that havent quite gotten to the point of being nerves yet. Only certain types of these cells have such a dramatic Lazarus-like effect on the affected mice, but Lorings team can readily identify them based on DNA analysis.

Even so, theyre not yet ready to treat human MS patients with the approach, she says. First, the researchers want to identify what the cells producea protein, perhaps, or a set of proteinsthat allows the mice to walk.

For other diseases, however, researchers are closer to being ready to transplant working versions of reprogrammed cells into sick people.

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Catholics warned about ice bucket challenge

MANILA The head of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines has a reminder to those taking the ice bucket challenge, which supports research efforts of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association (ALSA).

CBCP president Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas said research on ALS involves the use of stem cells.

”ALS is a degenerative disorder and stem-cells apparently hold out the promise of reversing the death and degeneration of brain cells, in particular,” Villegas said in a statement.

”Stem cells however are most readily harvested from embryos, and it is in this regard that this type of research is ethically problematic.”

Citing the ”Instruction on Respect for Human Life in Its Origin and on the Dignity of Procreation,” Villegas noted that ”human embryos obtained in vitro are human beings and subjects with rights.”

ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that attacks nerve cells and pathways in the brain and spinal cord, which eventually leads to paralysis.

Villegas said the ALS Association said in a statement that ”most stem-cell research in ALS is currently focused on iPS (induced pluripotent stem) cells, which are not burdened with ethical issues.”

”We are told that iPS cells are ‘induced pluripotent stem cells’, stem cells created from skin cells. Such cells would indeed be pluripotent, but would not be embryonic cells,” the CBCP chief said.

”As such, the ethical objection to the use of embryonic cells, whether harvested from embryos, or obtained through in vitro fertilization, would not arise.”

The prelate, however, noted that the ALS Association also admitted that ”iPS cells are used in ‘most stem-cell research.”’

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International Stem Cell Corporation to Present at Two Upcoming Investment Conferences

CARLSBAD, CA–(Marketwired – August 28, 2014) – International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCQB: ISCO) (www.internationalstemcell.com), a California-based biotechnology company developing novel stem cell based therapies and biomedical products, today announced that Executive Vice President Dr. Simon Craw will present a corporate overview of ISCO and its subsidiaries at two upcoming investment conferences.

Rodman and Renshaw 16th Annual Global Investment Conference:

Date:Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Time:11:40 a.m. ET Location:New York Palace Hotel, New York, NY Room:Kennedy I

Conference details:http://www.meetmax.com//sched/event_23003/~public/conference_home.html?event_id=23003

AEGIS CAPITAL Corp. 2014 Healthcare and Technology Conference:Date:Thursday, September 11, 2014 Time:10:45 a.m. PT Location:The Encore at Wynn, Las Vegas, NV

Conference details:http://www.meetmax.com/sched/event_25932/~public/conference_home.html?event_id=25932

Please contact the conference organizers if you have an interest in attending the conference or if you would like to arrange a meeting with International Stem Cell Corporation’s management team.

About International Stem Cell Corporation

International Stem Cell Corporation is focused on the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells (hpSCs) and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products. ISCO’s core technology, parthenogenesis, results in the creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs) hence avoiding ethical issues associated with the use or destruction of viable human embryos. ISCO scientists have created the first parthenogenetic, homozygous stem cell line that can be a source of therapeutic cells for hundreds of millions of individuals of differing genders, ages and racial background with minimal immune rejection after transplantation. hpSCs offer the potential to create the first true stem cell bank, UniStemCell. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology (www.lifelinecelltech.com), and stem cell-based skin care products through its subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care (www.lifelineskincare.com). More information is available atwww.internationalstemcell.com.

To receive ongoing corporate communications via email, visit: http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.

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IPS Cell Therapy | Stem Cells Research

A lot of individuals are regularly making an effort to find the best medications available today because of the presence of a lot of illnesses in the world. New treatments and variations of old ones are hitting the market because of this growing need of people and one of the newest alternatives to medication that experts have come up with is referred to as induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapy, also called iPS Cell Therapy or iPSC Therapy. What is Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell therapy?

Regardless if the entire thing is controversial, a ton of experts continue to show interest when it comes to stem cell therapy. Grown inside the laboratory, people are injected with transmuted cells to replace cells that are unhealthy. This is what science fiction is made of, but now almost a reality.

The thing about stem cell therapy is that it garnered and continues to garner a lot of bad publicity in line with moral and ethical concerns. Several years ago, people saw to it that no further research was done on embryonic stem cells but in 2006, studies were conducted by the Japanese but this time, they used mouse cells. More and more people became mindful of and interested in iPSC because of this shift in events.

About 5 years ago, the University of Wisconsin found a way to study iPSC with the help of adult human cells. The thing about iPSC is that people only had problems with the studies when embryonic stem cells were utilized. Because of such an event, efforts have been made to include iPSC processes in Regenerative or Reparative Medicine.

Various illnesses can affect daily living from arthritis to diabetes to burns and iPSC therapies can be a solution to these provided that adequate research is conducted. What you have here can also be utilized for diseases that are genetic in nature like cancer for example. Aside from dealing with spinal cord issues, there is also a chance that iPSC can be used to cure Parkinsons and Alzheimers disease.

There is so much potential in stem cell therapy. Imagine how much good it will do to mankind if healthy cells may scientifically be produced in laboratories and injected into patients. For people with cancer, the cancerous cells can easily be replaced with the ones that are healthy.

What you have here can change the way people look at disease and pain.. Not having to rely on the human body for cell regeneration is something that can lead to thousands of opportunities in health. There is still a need to perfect current research efforts on the matter but this is surely beyond science fiction.

Other than yet merely in experimental stage, the therapies are also very costly. These therapies need more time for experimentation and more years are necessary if you want to lower the costs of the therapies. But scientists remain hopeful.

One of the most popular therapies in line with stem cells these days is bone marrow transplantation. There are various patients that have different cancers related to the bone marrow or blood and this is what this transplantation serves to treat. It is a risky procedure, however, and may have several complications.

In various countries, scientists get support for this type of research. It may take years before people can rely on iPS Cell therapy on a regular basis but even if this is so, all the hard work will surely be well worth it because of the countless benefits that this form of therapy can bring. Pain and disease will be no match for science once this form of therapy is completed.

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IPS Cell Therapy | Stem Cells Research

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Stem Cell Therapy as a Treatment Option for Osteoarthritis – Video



Stem Cell Therapy as a Treatment Option for Osteoarthritis
Dr. Frank Garcia, board certified orthopedic surgeon with The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group, discusses the use of stem cell therapy in the treatment of osteo…

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Boy Scout Troop 286 Icebucket Challenge for the Scoutmaster – Video



Boy Scout Troop 286 Icebucket Challenge for the Scoutmaster
Ice Bucket Challenge Completed! With a whole lot of help from my Scouts! Donation went to the Midwest Stem Cell Therapy Center at KU Med in Kansas City. They do some terrific work there and…

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Advanced Cell Technology Announces 1:100 Reverse Stock Split

Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. , a leader in the field of regenerative medicine, today announced that it has completed a 1:100 reverse split of its common stock

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Scripps Research Institute Scientists Link Alcohol-Dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter

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Newswise LA JOLLA, CA August 27, 2014 Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence.

This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. The new research shows Nf1 regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases feelings of relaxation.

This novel and seminal study provides insights into the cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence, said TSRI Associate Professor Marisa Roberto, a co-author of the paper. Importantly, the study also offers a correlation between rodent and human data.

In addition to showing that Nf1 is key to the regulation of the GABA, the research, which was published recently in the journal Biological Psychiatry, shows that variations in the human version of the Nf1 gene are linked to alcohol-dependence risk and severity in patients.

Pietro Paolo Sanna, associate professor at TSRI and the studys corresponding author, was optimistic about the long-term clinical implications of the work. A better understanding of the molecular processes involved in the transition to alcohol dependence will foster novel strategies for prevention and therapy, he said.

A Genetic Culprit

Researchers have long sought a gene or genes that might be responsible for risk and severity of alcohol dependence. Despite a significant genetic contribution to alcohol dependence, few risk genes have been identified to date, and their mechanisms of action are generally poorly understood, said TSRI Staff Scientist Vez Repunte-Canonigo, co-first author of the paper with TSRI Research Associate Melissa Herman.

This research showed that Nf1 is one of those rare risk genes, but the TSRI researchers werent sure exactly how Nf1 affected the brain. The TSRI research team suspected that Nf1 might be relevant to alcohol-related GABA activity in an area of the brain called the central amygdala, which is important in decision-making and stress- and addiction-related processes.

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Bradley Hospital collaborative study identifies genetic change in autism-related gene

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Aug-2014

Contact: Jill Reuter jreuter@lifespan.org 401-432-1328 Lifespan

PROVIDENCE, R.I. A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients’ developmental disabilities.

Using whole-exome sequencing a method that examines the parts of genes that regulate protein, called exons – the team identified a genetic change in a newly recognized autism-associated gene, Activity-Dependent Neuroprotective Protein (ADNP), in a girl with developmental delay. This change in the ADNP gene helps explain the cause of developmental delay in this patient. This same genetic change in ADNP was also found in a boy who was diagnosed with autism.

The ADNP gene plays an important role in regulation of early brain development. Recently, genetic changes in this gene have been found to cause a novel genetic syndrome associated with autism. Changes in this gene may be among the most common causes of autism.

“Genetic testing is a very powerful diagnostic tool for individuals with developmental delay,” said Eric Morrow, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Developmental Disorder Genetics Research Program at Bradley Hospital and lead author of the study. “Through genetic testing, which is available to some in the clinical setting as well as in research, a medical diagnosis is possible for a large subset of patients.”

Morrow continued, “Genetic changes in ADNP are highly associated with autism and are found in at least .17 percent of autism cases. In these patients, changes in this gene represent an important part of the medical cause for developmental delay and/or autism. The use of these genome-wide sequencing methods in patients with developmental disorders is one of the best examples of the applications of modern genomics in clinical practice.”

This study represents one of the first publications resulting in part from Morrow’s work with the Rhode Island Collaborative for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART), which is co-led by Morrow. Funding for RI-CART is provided in part by a grant from the Simons Foundation for Autism Research and also through support from the Brown Institute for Brain Science (BIBS), the Norman Prince Neuroscience Institute at Rhode Island Hospital, the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University, Women & Infants Hospital and the Groden Network. This cross-disciplinary collaboration, including the work of Chanika Phornphutkul, M.D., director of Hasbro Children’s Hospital’s division of Clinical Genetics, and the paper’s lead authors from several departments and training programs, represents an important development in research and clinical care for patients.

###

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Scientists looking across human, fly and worm genomes find shared biology

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

27-Aug-2014

Contact: Steve Benowitz steven.benowitz@nih.gov 301-451-8325 NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Researchers analyzing human, fly, and worm genomes have found that these species have a number of key genomic processes in common, reflecting their shared ancestry. The findings, appearing Aug. 28, 2014, in the journal Nature, offer insights into embryonic development, gene regulation and other biological processes vital to understanding human biology and disease.

The studies highlight the data generated by the modENCODE Project and the ENCODE Project, both supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. Integrating data from the three species, the model organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (modENCODE) Consortium studied how gene expression patterns and regulatory proteins that help determine cell fate often share common features. Investigators also detailed the similar ways in which the three species use protein packaging to compact DNA into the cell nucleus and to regulate genome function by controlling access to DNA.

Launched in 2007, the goal of modENCODE is to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the fruit fly and roundworm genomes for use by the research community. Such elements include genes that code for proteins, non-protein-coding genes and regulatory elements that control gene expression. The current work builds on initial catalogs published in 2010. The modENCODE projects complement the work being done by the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project, which is building a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human and mouse genomes.

“The modENCODE investigators have provided a valuable resource for researchers worldwide,” said NHGRI Director Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D. “The insights gained about the workings of model organisms’ genomes greatly help to inform our understanding of human biology.”

“One way to describe and understand the human genome is through comparative genomics and studying model organisms,” said Mark Gerstein, Ph.D., Albert L. Williams Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, and the lead author on one of the papers. “The special thing about the worm and fly is that they are very distant from humans evolutionarily, so finding something conserved across all three human, fly and worm tells us it is a very ancient, fundamental process.”

In one study, scientists led by Dr. Gerstein and others, analyzed human, fly and worm transcriptomes, the collection of gene transcripts (or readouts) in a genome. They used large amounts of gene expression data generated in the ENCODE and modENCODE projects including more than 67 billion gene sequence readouts to discover gene expression patterns shared by all three species, particularly for developmental genes.

Investigators showed that the ways in which DNA is packaged in the cell are similar in many respects, and, in many cases, the species share programs for turning on and off genes in a coordinated manner. More specifically, they used gene expression patterns to match the stages of worm and fly development and found sets of genes that parallel each other in their usage. They also found the genes specifically expressed in the worm and fly embryos are re-expressed in the fly pupae, the stage between larva and adult.

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Gene decides alcohol addiction risk

New York, Aug 28 (IANS) What has alcohol addiction got to do with genes? A study indicates that a specific signaling pathway can be associated with the risk and severity of alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1) which scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. "This novel study provides insights into the cellular …

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Stanford researchers work to understand gene expression across organisms

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

27-Aug-2014

Contact: Krista Conger kristac@stanford.edu 650-725-5371 Stanford University Medical Center

Fruit flies and roundworms have long been used as model organisms to learn more about human biology and disease. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that although many aspects of regulatory networks are conserved among the three distantly related organisms, other differences have emerged over evolutionary time.

These differences may explain why, for example, worms slither, flies fly and humans walk on two legs, even though they all use the same basic genetic building blocks.

“We’re trying to understand the basic principles that govern how genes are turned on and off,” said Michael Snyder, PhD, professor and chair of genetics at Stanford. “The worm and the fly have been the premier model organisms in biology for decades, and have provided the foundation for much of what we’ve learned about human biology. If we can learn how the rules of gene expression evolved over time, we can apply that knowledge to better understand human biology and disease.”

The research was conducted as part of a multi-institutional collaborative effort to understand more about how organisms control the expression of their genes to generate neurons, muscles, skin, blood and all of the other types of cells and tissues necessary for complex life all at the exactly the right time and place in the body.

The research is an extension of the ENCODE, or Encyclopedia of DNA Elements, project that was initiated in 2003. As part of the large collaborative project, which was sponsored by the National Human Genome Research Institute, researchers published more than 4 million regulatory elements found within the human genome in 2012. Known as binding sites, these regions of DNA serve as landing pads for proteins and other molecules known as regulatory factors that control when and how genes are used to make proteins.

The new effort, known as modENCODE, brings a similar analysis to key model organisms like the fly and the worm. Snyder is the senior author of two of four papers that will be published Aug. 28 in Nature describing some aspects of the modENCODE project, which has led to the publication, or upcoming publication, of more than 20 papers in a variety of journals.

Postdoctoral scholar Carlos Araya, PhD, is the lead author of one of the Stanford papers, which mapped the binding sites and cellular expression patterns of 92 regulatory factors in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans. Postdoctoral scholar Alan Boyle, PhD, shares lead authorship with Araya on the second paper, which compares the newly generated roundworm data with human and fruit fly regulatory factors to identify regions of similarity and difference among the organisms. Research associate Trupti Kawli, PhD, coordinated the research in the Snyder lab and is a co-author of both papers.

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Scientists solve mystery of why specific signaling pathway can be linked with alcohol dependence

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence.

This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. The new research shows Nf1 regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases feelings of relaxation.

“This novel and seminal study provides insights into the cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence,” said TSRI Associate Professor Marisa Roberto, a co-author of the paper. “Importantly, the study also offers a correlation between rodent and human data.”

In addition to showing that Nf1 is key to the regulation of the GABA, the research, which was published recently in the journal Biological Psychiatry, shows that variations in the human version of the Nf1 gene are linked to alcohol-dependence risk and severity in patients.

Pietro Paolo Sanna, associate professor at TSRI and the study’s corresponding author, was optimistic about the long-term clinical implications of the work. “A better understanding of the molecular processes involved in the transition to alcohol dependence will foster novel strategies for prevention and therapy,” he said.

A Genetic Culprit

Researchers have long sought a gene or genes that might be responsible for risk and severity of alcohol dependence. “Despite a significant genetic contribution to alcohol dependence, few risk genes have been identified to date, and their mechanisms of action are generally poorly understood,” said TSRI Staff Scientist Vez Repunte-Canonigo, co-first author of the paper with TSRI Research Associate Melissa Herman.

This research showed that Nf1 is one of those rare risk genes, but the TSRI researchers weren’t sure exactly how Nf1 affected the brain. The TSRI research team suspected that Nf1 might be relevant to alcohol-related GABA activity in an area of the brain called the central amygdala, which is important in decision-making and stress- and addiction-related processes.

“As GABA release in the central amygdala has been shown to be critical in the transition from recreational drinking to alcohol dependence, we thought that Nf1 regulation of GABA release might be relevant to alcohol consumption,” said Herman.

The team tested several behavioral models, including a model in which mice escalate alcohol drinking after repeated withdrawal periods, to study the effects of partially deleting Nf1. In this experiment, which simulated the transition to excessive drinking that is associated with alcohol dependence in humans, they found that mice with functional Nf1 genes steadily increased their ethanol intake starting after just one episode of withdrawal. Conversely, mice with a partially deleted Nf1 gene showed no increase in alcohol consumption.

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Bioengineers Close To Creating Painkillers Without Using Opium From Poppies

By Tom Abate, Stanford School of Engineering

A decade-long effort in genetic engineering is close to creating yeast that makes palliative medicines in stainless steel vats.

For centuries poppy plants have been grown to provide opium, the compound from which morphine and other important medicines such as oxycodone are derived.

Now bioengineers at Stanford have hacked the DNA of yeast, reprograming these simple cells to make opioid-based medicines via a sophisticated extension of the basic brewing process that makes beer.

Led by Associate Professor of Bioengineering Christina Smolke, the Stanford team has already spent a decade genetically engineering yeast cells to reproduce the biochemistry of poppies with the ultimate goal of producing opium-based medicines, from start to finish, in fermentation vats.

We are now very close to replicating the entire opioid production process in a way that eliminates the need to grow poppies, allowing us to reliably manufacture essential medicines while mitigating the potential for diversion to illegal use, said Smolke, who outlines her work in the August 24th edition of Nature Chemical Biology.

In the new report Smolke and her collaborators, Kate Thodey, a post-doctoral scholar in bioengineering, and Stephanie Galanie, a doctoral student in chemistry, detail how they added five genes from two different organisms to yeast cells. Three of these genes came from the poppy itself, and the others from a bacterium that lives on poppy plant stalks.

This multi-species gene mashup was required to turn yeast into cellular factories that replicate two, now-separate processes: how nature produces opium in poppies, and then how pharmacologists use chemical processes to further refine opium derivatives into modern opioid drugs such as hydrocodone.

From Plants to Pills Today

Plant-derived opium has been used and abused for centuries, but a good place to begin the modern story is with the use of morphine during World War II.

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Bioengineers Close To Creating Painkillers Without Using Opium From Poppies

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Weigh In: What's the Next Revolution for Medicine?

Medicine looks incredibly different than it did a century ago (which I think we can all say thank goodness for that). From new technology such as MRI scanners and antibiotics, to improvements in logistics, such as widespread immunization programs and organ-donation schemes, medicine seems to be constantly modernizing.

But for every revolution in medicine thats complete, there must be a dozen more that havent even started. Quick lab diagnostics are great now how do we make those affordable for clinics in rural Africa? Patients are gathering their own genetic and lifestyle data now how can doctors use that to improve their medical care?

Over the last couple of months here at Citizen Science Salon, weve featured ten different projects in the Exploring a Culture of Health series, brought to you by SciStarter, Discover, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. These projects aim to shake up medicine as we know it.

Some of those were directed at medical professionals. We asked nurses to share their on-the-job workarounds; we encouraged medical staff to imagine a better doctors office experience; and we solicited ideas for how charts and graphs could better communicate complex health ideas.

Other questions were posed to organizations, such as hospitals, governments and schools. We challenged orgs to think up ways to reuse wasted supplies, to ensure privacy for patient-supplied data, to improve their communitys overall health, and to provide support to kids whove faced childhood trauma.

Finally, the blogs posed questions to all of us as patients. Would you use a free online course to learn more about a health condition you or someone close to you had? Would you volunteer personal information to help scientists study a disease you have? Would you use an app to track your daily habits and report them to your doctor?

We live in an interesting time, where data is paramount and whole industries are built on its sharing. Our smart phones sync with wearable sleep-trackers and pedometers, and we can share that data socially. Wired clothing and smart contact lenses are in development to provide even more real-time vitals. These devices for the moment are for personal use, but someday doctors could, with your permission, also view these feeds and use them to help improve your health.

What are your ideas for how smart gadgets could make peoples lives healthier? Maybe a new app or a new device? Perhaps a reformed approach to medical charts that could integrate user-generated data? Maybe ways to use social networks to encourage healthier behaviors? Or maybe something we havent even thought of before now

We want to hear your ideas. Leave them in the comments below, or email them to editorial@discovermagazine.com. The most inspiring ideas will be featured in an upcoming print issue and may just bring about yet another exciting revolution in healthcare.

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30 Essential Ideas you should know about ADHD, 4B ADHD and Genetics – Video



30 Essential Ideas you should know about ADHD, 4B ADHD and Genetics
You can watch the original video in full here for free http://www.caddac.ca/cms/video/parents_player.html CADDAC website where you can buy the DVD. Please su…

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The Sims 3 | Perfect Genetics Challenge Part 21: Unlucky – Video



The Sims 3 | Perfect Genetics Challenge Part 21: Unlucky
In this part, we change Hunter's hairstyle and give birth to another baby. The Sims 3 Perfect Genetics Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0B…

By: simplyapril

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The Sims 3 | Perfect Genetics Challenge Part 21: Unlucky – Video

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MENDEL EXPLAINING GENETICS CROSSES 2 – Video



MENDEL EXPLAINING GENETICS CROSSES 2

By: Walter Jahn

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Under the Microscope: Genetics – Video



Under the Microscope: Genetics
For decades, Idaho Fish and Game stocked hatchery rainbow trout often on top of native cutthroat trout. Cross-breeding between the two groups of fish became …

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Under the Microscope: Genetics – Video

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Lets Play The Sims 3 Perfect Genetics/100 Baby Challenge Live Stream Part 16 – Video



Lets Play The Sims 3 Perfect Genetics/100 Baby Challenge Live Stream Part 16
Perfect Genetics and 100 Baby Challenge in 1 — Watch live at http://www.twitch.tv/gbabychallenger.

By: GBabyChallenger

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Lets Play The Sims 3 Perfect Genetics/100 Baby Challenge Live Stream Part 16 – Video

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Gage Green Genetics update – Video



Gage Green Genetics update
18 over MMMP patient and caregiver in full compliance. This is a test grow for thesocialgrow and gage green Genetics. Plants are doing very good nice and green.

By: BolagnaSheetsMD .

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Gage Green Genetics update – Video

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MINECRAFT – 1.7.2 – Avanced Genetics – Video



MINECRAFT – 1.7.2 – Avanced Genetics
Primer mod que utilizaremos en esta nueva serie, pico ser todo! Descarga del mod: http://ag.teamdna.de/ Estoy en twitter! @jerrypkm Link de los tutoriales de Redstone: http://www.youtube.com…

By: MinecraftCoyoacan

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