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Aarkstore -Stem Cell Research in Cardiology – Video



Aarkstore -Stem Cell Research in Cardiology
This market insight report on Stem Cell Research in Cardiology emphasizes on the market for stem cells in Cardiology. The study is segmented by Source (Allogenic and Autogenic) and by Type…

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'Mega' cells control growth of blood-producing cells

While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these “mega” cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The Stowers study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).

The findings from the lab of Stowers Investigator Linheng Li, Ph.D., described in the Oct. 19 issue of the journal Nature Medicine, could cause researchers to rethink what they know about the workings of megakaryocytes and potentially lead to new treatments for patients recovering from chemotherapy or organ transplantation.

“Our results suggest that megakaryocytes might be used clinically to facilitate adult stem cell regeneration and to expand cultured cells for adult stem cell transplants,” says Meng Zhao, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at Stowers and lead author on the study. Stowers researchers discovered that megakaryocytes directly regulate the function of murine hematopoietic stem cells — adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells and that constantly renew the body’s blood supply. These cells can also develop into all types of blood cells, including white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.

Because of their remarkable ability to renew themselves and differentiate into other cells, hematopoietic stems cells are the focus of intense research and have been used to treat many diseases and conditions. The transplantation of isolated human hematopoietic stem cells is used in the treatment of anemia, immune deficiencies and other diseases, including cancer.

Basic research has centered on identifying and characterizing hematopoietic stem cells, however, it is still not clear how hematopoietic stem cells actually work, and how they are regulated because of the complexity of the bone marrow microenvironment. Zhao and his colleagues discovered that as a terminally differentiated progeny, megakaryocytes regulate hematopoietic stem cells by performing two previously unknown functions.

“Megakaryocytes can directly regulate the amount of hematopoietic stem cells by telling the cells when they need to keep in the quiescent stage, and when they need to start proliferating to meet increased demand.” Maintaining that delicate balance is important, he adds. “You don’t want to have too many or too few hematopoietic stem cells.”

These findings are supported by similar research from the laboratory of Paul S. Frenette, Ph.D., at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, also reported in the Oct. 19 issue of Nature Medicine.

Employing the advanced technology of the Institute’s Cytometry, Imaging and Histology centers, the researchers examined the relationship between megakaryocytes and hematopoietic stem cells in mouse bone marrow. In the course of their research, they found that the protein transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1), contained in megakaryocytes, signaled quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells. They also found that when under stress from chemotherapy, megakaryocytes signaled fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1), to stimulate the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells.

“Our findings suggest that megakaryocytes are required for the recovery of hematopoietic stem cells post chemotherapy,” explains Li. The discovery could provide insight for using megakaryocyte-derived factors, such as TGF-B1 and FGF1, clinically to facilitate regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells, he adds.

Engineering a megakaryocyte niche (a special environment in which stem cells live and renew) that supports the growth of hematopoietic stem cells in culture, is the next step for the researchers. Zhao and his colleagues are also investigating whether a megakaryocyte niche can be used to help expand human hematopoietic stem cells in vitro and stem cell transplantation for patients.

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Parent stem cells controlled by progeny

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New Insight That "Mega" Cells Control the Growth of Blood-Producing Cells

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Newswise Kansas City, Mo. – While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these mega cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The Stowers study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).

The findings from the lab of Stowers Investigator Linheng Li, Ph.D., described in the Oct. 19 issue of the journal Nature Medicine, could cause researchers to rethink what they know about the workings of megakaryocytes and potentially lead to new treatments for patients recovering from chemotherapy or organ transplantation.

Our results suggest that megakaryocytes might be used clinically to facilitate adult stem cell regeneration and to expand cultured cells for adult stem cell transplants, says Meng Zhao, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at Stowers and lead author on the study. Stowers researchers discovered that megakaryocytes directly regulate the function of murine hematopoietic stem cellsadult stem cells that form blood and immune cells and that constantly renew the bodys blood supply. These cells can also develop into all types of blood cells, including white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets.

Because of their remarkable ability to renew themselves and differentiate into other cells, hematopoietic stems cells are the focus of intense research and have been used to treat many diseases and conditions. The transplantation of isolated human hematopoietic stem cells is used in the treatment of anemia, immune deficiencies and other diseases, including cancer.

Basic research has centered on identifying and characterizing hematopoietic stem cells, however, it is still not clear how hematopoietic stem cells actually work, and how they are regulated because of the complexity of the bone marrow microenvironment. Zhao and his colleagues discovered that as a terminally differentiated progeny, megakaryocytes regulate hematopoietic stem cells by performing two previously unknown functions.

Megakaryocytes can directly regulate the amount of hematopoietic stem cells by telling the cells when they need to keep in the quiescent stage, and when they need to start proliferating to meet increased demand. Maintaining that delicate balance is important, he adds. You dont want to have too many or too few hematopoietic stem cells.

These findings are supported by similar research from the laboratory of Paul S. Frenette, Ph.D., at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, also reported in the Oct. 19 issue of Nature Medicine.

Employing the advanced technology of the Institutes Cytometry, Imaging and Histology centers, the researchers examined the relationship between megakaryocytes and hematopoietic stem cells in mouse bone marrow. In the course of their research, they found that the protein transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1), contained in megakaryocytes, signaled quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells. They also found that when under stress from chemotherapy, megakaryocytes signaled fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1), to stimulate the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells.

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Progeny 'mega cells' pivotal in adult stem cell transplant

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Bone-marrow transplant teenager: 'I feel angry that my community let me down'

There are myriad complex cultural and religious reasons as to why ethnic minority donor rates are so low. We dont fully understand the reasons but this has to change if more lives are to be saved, says Dr Adnan Sharif, a consultant nephrologist at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham and member of the National Black, Asian and minority ethnic Transplant Association (NBTA). Aneesas case is heartbreaking, but unfortunately it is not isolated. There are simply not enough minority ethnic communities donating.

In August 2012, Aneesa the eldest of three siblings who live in Birmingham with their father Manzoor, 46, a purchasing manager for a car company, and mother Resiat, 46, a primary school teacher started suffering from headaches and feeling lethargic. The following month, her GP took a blood test that revealed Aneesas platelet count platelets help blood to clot was critically low, leaving her at risk of excessive bruising and bleeding.

Aneesa was rushed to the citys Queen Elizabeth Hospital, where, two days later, she was diagnosed with aplastic anaemia after further blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. A potentially fatal disease of the bone marrow, it affects around two people per million and is caused by a deficiency of all three blood cell types red and white blood cells, and platelets. Symptoms include fatigue and a reduced immune system, which can lead to infection and bleeding.

Blood transfusions are the best treatment for serious cases such as Aneesas, and a bone marrow transplant in which a donors healthy stem cells are injected into the patient the only cure. I felt shocked and isolated, recalls Aneesa of her diagnosis. There was no history of the condition in my family and no reason given as to why I had developed it.

She immediately had a 14-hour blood transfusion, and remained in hospital for a month to have further platelet transfusions every three days. Meanwhile, Aneesas brother Eghshaam, 18, and sister Iyla-Rose, six, were tested to see if they could be donors. For bone marrow stem cell transplants to succeed, there needs to be a close match in tissue type between donor and patient.

When it transpired that her siblings tissue types were less than a 50 per cent match, Aneesa was forced to abandon her studies because of her failing health and she was put on the organ donor list.

My doctor warned me there was a shortage of ethnic minority donors, she says. I was surprised. I naively assumed everybody who needed a donor would find one.

By the end of 2012, Aneesa had developed liver and kidney failure a side effect of the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive pills she had to take to protect her immune system. I had to have two litres of fluid injected through a drip every day to stop me dehydrating, she says. I grew jealous of friends leading normal lives.

Last January, Aneesas doctors widened their search to include the international bone marrow donor registry, which contains 10 million people. But, unfortunately, the lack of BAME donors is a global problem.

Although the majority of religious leaders have issued statements of support for organ donation, many Muslims still believe that to donate would contravene their religion. There are certain aspects of the Islamic faith such as the emphasis put on the respect of the dead and not defacing the body that suggest you shouldnt donate, explains Dr Sharif. He says that even though bone marrow donation a relatively simple procedure compared with other organ transplants doesnt require the death of the donor, it is viewed with similar suspicion.

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Working intestine grown in lab

Getty Scientists have grown a working intestine.

Functioning human intestine has been grown from stem cells in the laboratory, paving the way to new treatments for gut disorders.

Scientists first created tissue fragments called “organoids” that were transplanted into mice, where they matured.

Each animal produced “significant” amounts of fully functional human intestine.

US lead scientist Dr Michael Helmrath, from the Intestinal Rehabilitation Program at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, on Sunday said: “This provides a new way to study the many diseases and conditions that can cause intestinal failure, from genetic disorders appearing at birth to conditions that strike later in life, such as cancer and Crohn’s disease.

“These studies also advance the longer-term goal of growing tissues that can replace damaged human intestine.”

The organoids were generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – stem cells created by genetically altering adult skin cells, causing them to revert to an immature embryonic state.

Like stem cells taken from early stage embryos, iPSCs have the ability to become any type of tissue in the body.

The fragments were grafted onto the kidneys of mice to provide them with a necessary blood supply.

The cells then grew and multiplied on their own. The mice used were genetically engineered so their immune systems would accept human tissues.

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Can a bodys own stem cells help heal a heart?

If you skin your knee, your body makes new skin. If you donate a portion of your liver, whats left will grow back to near-normal size. But if you lose a billion heart cells during a heart attack, only a small fraction of those will be replaced. In the words of Ke Cheng, an associate professor of regenerative medicine at N.C. State, The hearts self-repair potency is very limited.

Cheng has designed a nanomedicine he hopes will give the heart some help. It consists of an engineered nanoparticle that gathers the bodys own self-repair cells and brings them to the injured heart tissue.

In this case, the self-repair cells are adult stem cells. A stem cell is a very rich biological factory, Cheng said. Stem cells can become heart muscle, or they can produce growth factors that are beneficial to the regrowth of heart muscle.

After a heart attack, dying and dead heart cells release chemical signals that alert stem cells circulating in the blood to move to the injured site. But there just arent very many stem cells in the bloodstream, and sometimes they are not sufficiently attracted to the injured tissue.

Matchmakers with hooks

The nanomedicine Cheng designed consists of an iron-based nanoparticle festooned with two different kinds of hooks one kind of hook grabs adult stem cells, and the other kind of hook grabs injured heart tissue. Cheng calls the nanomedicine a matchmaker, because it brings together cells that can make repairs with cells that need repairs.

The hooks are antibodies that seek and grab certain types of cells. Because the antibodies are situated on an iron nanoparticle, they and the stem cells theyve grabbed can be physically directed to the heart using an external magnet. Cheng calls the nanomedicine MagBICE, for magnetic bifunctional cell engager.

The magnet is a first pass to get the iron-based particles and antibodies near the heart. Once there, the antibodies are able to identify and stick to the injured heart tissue, bringing the stem cells right where they need to go. Using two methods of targeting the magnet and the antibodies improves the chances of being able to bring a large number of stem cells at the site of injury.

In addition to providing a way to physically move the stem cells to the heart, the iron nanoparticles are visible on MRI machines, which allows MagBICE to be visualized after its infused into the bloodstream.

Cheng doesnt foresee much toxicity from the nanomedicine unless someone is allergic or particularly sensitive to iron. In fact, the iron-based nanoparticle that forms the platform for the antibodies is an FDA-approved IV treatment for anemia.

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UC San Diego Health System announces human testing of stem cell therapies

SAN DIEGO (CNS) – UC San Diego Health System announced Monday that human testing of injected neural stem cell therapies are underway at its Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center.

Researchers are conducting three different trials — one on a 26-year-old woman paralyzed after a traffic crash, and others on diabetes and leukemia patients.

“What we are seeing after years of work is the rubber hitting the road,” said Lawrence Goldstein, director of the UC San Diego Stem Cell program and Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center.

“These are three very ambitious and innovative trials,” he said. “Each followed a different development path — each addresses a very different disease or condition. It speaks to the maturation of stem cell science that we’ve gotten to the point of testing these very real medical applications in people.”

The first tests are being made with low doses in order to ensure the safety of the patients, Goldstein said.

Working with Maryland-based Neuralstem Inc., neural stem cells were injected into the site of the paralyzed woman’s spinal cord injury on Sept. 30, and she is recovering at home without complications or adverse effects, said Dr. Joseph Ciacci, a neurosurgeon at UC San Diego Health System. Her name was not released.

The researchers hope that the transplanted cells will develop into neurons that bridge the gap created by the injury, replace severed or lost nerve connections and restore at least some motor and sensory function. According to UCSD, testing in laboratory rats with spinal cord injuries were promising.

A two-year trial on about 40 Type 1 diabetes patients will involve implanting cells under the skin that were derived from embryonic stem cells, with the hope they will safely mature into pancreatic beta and other cells able to produce a continuous supply of needed insulin and other substances, according to the researchers. The first procedure is expected to take place sometime this month, according to UCSD.

Type 1 diabetes, which usually onsets during childhood and has no cure, causes the pancreas to produce little or no insulin. Patients have to inject insulin daily and rigorously manage their diet and lifestyle.

The third trial will involve a potential drug to fight chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the most common form of blood cancer in adults. Patients in the test will receive the drug via an intravenous infusion every 14 days at the UCSD Moores Cancer Center.

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Designer organs come closer to reality

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Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

CINCINNATI, Oct. 19, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Researchers have successfully transplanted "organoids" of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Reporting their results Oct. 19 online in Nature Medicine, scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical …

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FranchiseStemcell Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging – Video



FranchiseStemcell Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging
Fat Stem Cell Therapy Anti Aging .

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Cell Therapy Part 1 by Dr. Friedrichson – Video



Cell Therapy Part 1 by Dr. Friedrichson

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Cell Therapy Part II Friedrichson – Video



Cell Therapy Part II Friedrichson

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T-Cell Therapy Puts Leukemia Patients in Extended Remission – Video



T-Cell Therapy Puts Leukemia Patients in Extended Remission
An experimental therapy has brought prolonged remissions to a high proportion of patients who were facing death from advanced leukemia after standard treatments had failed, researchers are…

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what conditions can be treated using Autologous Adult stem cell therapy? – Video



what conditions can be treated using Autologous Adult stem cell therapy?
Conditions that Respond to Chronic Debilitating Diseases.

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What is stem celll therapy? – Video



What is stem celll therapy?
Renowned scientist Kristin Comella discussing latest advancements in Stem Cell Therapy.

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How is stem cell therapy performed? – Video



How is stem cell therapy performed?
Stem Cell Scientist Kristin Comella discussing Cell Therapy Procedures.

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Cytokine therapy enhances natural killer cell functions against tumor cells

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

20-Oct-2014

Contact: Corinne Williams press_releases@the-jci.org Journal of Clinical Investigation @jclinicalinvest

Natural killer (NK) cells are sentinels within the immune system that rapidly respond to and kill diseased cells. NK cells typically target and eliminate cells lacking the surface protein MHC class I. However, many tumor cells lack this protein yet are resistant to NK cell surveillance and killing. A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that cytokine therapy enhances the activity of NK cells against tumors lacking MHC class I. Using murine models, David Raulet and colleagues at the University of California Berkeley determined that tumors lacking MHC class I inactivate NK cells. Mixed tumors composed of MHC class I positive and MHC class I negative cells also caused NK cell to become nonresponsive. Importantly, treatment of mice bearing MHC class I-deficient tumors with the cytokines IL-12 and IL-18 or with the H9 “superkine” restored NK cell activity, reduced tumor size, and increased survival. The results of this study support further investigation into the use of cytokine therapy for patients with tumors lacking MHC class I.

###

TITLE

Cytokine therapy reverses NK cell anergy in MHC-deficient tumors

AUTHOR CONTACT:

David Raulet University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA Phone: 510-642-9521; E-mail: raulet@berkeley.edu

View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/74337?key=63d8d1b0b77cbbf366ee

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Nuvilex Contracts With University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna to Conduct Preclinical Studies on the Use of Cell …

SILVER SPRING, Md. — Nuvilex, Inc. (OTCQB:NVLX), a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing cell and gene therapy solutions for the treatment of diseases, announced today that it has entered into …

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Why depression and aging are linked to increased disease risk

Psychological stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders are associated with increased risk for aging-related diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relation are unknown. Understanding these mechanisms may contribute to the development of targeted preventive strategies and new or improved treatments for these devastating diseases. This work is presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology congress in Berlin.

Now an international group of researchers from Germany and the US has found that both ageing and depression are associated with changes in the FKBP5 gene. Genes can be regulated by the addition or removal of methyl (CH3) groups to an area of the gene. The researchers found that ageing can decrease this methylation process, causing the FKBP5 gene to be overexpressed. They also found that when someone is depressed, this demethylation process is accelerated even further.

In a second finding they found that this increased FKBP5 expression is associated with increases in biochemical markers of inflammation and cardiovascular risk.

According to lead researcher, Dr Anthony Zannas (Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich): “We found that both aging and depression seem to lead to changes in how DNA is processed, and that this can control the expression of genes that regulate how we respond to stress. These changes are associated with increased inflammation, and we believe that this may lead to the increased risk for several aging-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders, that has been observed in chronically stressed and depressed individuals.

Our work shows that risk for aging-related diseases could be conferred by epigenetic changes of stress-related genes and resultant increases in the expression of inflammation markers. It’s too early to say that we are seeing a cause and effect, so we need to confirm the findings by using larger samples and uncover the mechanisms using animal models. If we can do that, we may have the opportunity to develop tests for age-related diseases and new ways to prevent the harmful effects of stress.”

The FKBP5 gene is found on chromosome 6 in humans. It codes the FK506 binding protein 5, also known as FKBP5. This protein is known to play a role in stress responses, immune regulation and basic cellular processes involving protein folding.

Commenting on the work for the ECNP, Professor Bill Deakin (Manchester) said: “There is a growing realisation that depression is one expression of a set of vulnerabilities for a range of disorders associated with age including obesity, diabetes, cerebro-vascular disease and dementia. Zannas and colleagues are now beginning to unpick some of the first molecular mechanisms of the shared risk. The focus is on FKBP5 a protein transcription factor that regulates several genes relevant to depression (via stress hormones) and to disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Experiencing trauma in childhood and ageing have long-term influences on activity of the gene for FKBP5. This epigenetic regulation is abnormal in people with depression. It is early days and these findings need to be confirmed in definitively large populations. Nevertheless, the results point the way to finding molecular subtypes of depression with specific treatments targeted on transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms.”

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The above story is based on materials provided by European College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Transcriptome Profiling Grants Launched to Support New Biomarker Discovery

CARLSBAD, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Thermo Fisher Scientific will fast-track 12 translational research teams gene-expression profiling through an innovative grant program launched today. Selected applicants will receive free next-generation RNA sequencing services to further their research in the field of cancer genomics.

The new Ion Torrent Transcriptome Profiling Grant Program recognizes the broad benefits of gene-level expression analysis and predictive biomarker discovery, along with the hurdles that translational researchers face characterizing degraded or archived cells. The award includes use of the Ion AmpliSeq Transcriptome Human Gene Expression Kit, which is capable of profiling the gene expression of over 20,000 RefSeq targets from as little as 10ng of RNA.

Transcriptome profiling is a tremendously important tool for understanding how genetic variants alter cell expression, says Chris Linthwaite, head of Genetic Sciences Research for Thermo Fisher Scientific. With the Ion AmpliSeq Transcriptome technology, researchers can effectively screen for thousands of known and novel biomarkers for potential breakthroughs in cancer diagnostics, prognostics and experimental therapy use. Thermo Fisher Scientifics new grant program will place this technology within reach of outstanding scientists around the world that currently must take the long road to biomarker discovery.

Next-generation RNA sequencing improves the quality and dependability of data, as well as broadening the pool of samples that researchers can draw upon. Along with technology, grant winners also gain access to technical experts from Thermo Fisher Scientifics Certified Service Provider partners, which will run all the experiments.

Thermo Fisher Scientific will award the grants based on the scientific relevance and potential of the programs under consideration, the strength of the submitted abstract and how applicants plan to build on the data generated as a result of the grant.

Research teams awarded sequencing services will in no way be obligated to Thermo Fisher Scientific partnerships in the future.

More information on how to apply for the Ion Torrent Transcriptome Profiling Grant Program can be found here, or by visiting the Thermo Fisher Scientific conference booth #513 at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) in San Diego Oct. 1822, 2014.

Ion AmpliSeq Transcriptome is For Research Use Only; not for use in diagnostic procedures.

About Thermo Fisher Scientific

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is the world leader in serving science, with revenues of $17 billion and 50,000 employees in 50 countries. Our mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics and increase laboratory productivity. Through our four premier brands Thermo Scientific, Life Technologies, Fisher Scientific and Unity Lab Services we offer an unmatched combination of innovative technologies, purchasing convenience and comprehensive support. For more information, please visitwww.thermofisher.com.

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Gene mutation linked to leukaemia occurs among elderly

Washington, Oct 20 (IANS) At least two percent of people over age 40 and five percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukaemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to research at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.

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Gene Simmons: His Secrets To Building A Brand Name

I spoke to Gene Simmons, who co-founded KISS back in 1973 and was also the bassist and co-vocalist of the band. KISS has exceeded worldwide sales of more than 100 million albums, 40 million of which were in the US. The merchandising machine of KISS has over 2,500 licenses to date and the band has broken box office records set by both the Beatles and Elvis.Among Simmons projects include the KISS Golf Course inLas Vegas, the Kiss Coffeehouse inMyrtle Beachand his reality TV show called Gene Simmons Family Jewels, which has been on air for nine seasons. He is also a partner with the global restaurant chain called Rock And Brews and has written two bestselling books.

His new book is called Me, Inc.: Build an Army of One, Unleash Your Inner Rock God, Win in Life and Business. In the following interview, Simmons talks about the importance of hard work, pursuing your passion, moving to where opportunities are and more.

Dan Schawbel: How are you able to balance your personal and professional lives, especially as an entrepreneur who is involved in so many ventures?

Gene Simmons:Honestly, theres no substitute for hard work, and being at the right place, at the right time, with the right thingand Ive been blessed to have found my soul mate, Shannon, with whom we have two great kids, now fully grown. Most of that, came from Shannon.

Schawbel:What does it take for you to manage all of your businesses and keep your brand consistent and relevant?

Simmons:Im probably not a good example of consistency and relevance. While I would recommend the latter, I simply trust my gut. And it has earned me a good living. I would never question why I do things. Sometimes, they have no relationship to each other. But everything seems to work out at the end. Call it luck. Call it blessed.

Schawbel:How did you originally pursue your path as a musician and what do you recommend to other people who are trying to find their own path in life?

Simmons:Unfortunately, a new musical act will not have the same opportunities I had. In my time, there were record companies, who paid you advances, non-recoupable against any failure the album might have. And they paid for tour support. And they put up posters in record stores. And they paid for videos.The record industry was the single biggest reason why bands had a more than even chance of succeeding.now, unfortunately I do not see the opportunity for another Beatles, or Zepplin or even KISS. The chaos that exists on the Internet with filesharing and downloading, prevents a sound business model to exist. So its going to be very difficult for new bands to get any kind of traction.

Schawbel:What are some of your branding and marketing tactics that the average person can use to get a job or advance in their career?

Simmons:It bears noting, if you live in a very small town no one has ever heard of, it may be to your advantage to move to a large city, where the action is. That means, if you want to be in country and western, move to Nashvilleother forms of music, move to New York or LA.

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Personalis Introduces New Services for Cancer Research and Clinical Trials

Personalis, Inc., a leading genomics-based service provider, today announced it is launching an expanded portfolio of cancer research solutions based on its ACE sequencing, informatics and content technology platform.

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