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Can scientists clone a rhinoceros?

Nola, the only surviving northern white rhinoceros at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, rests at the facility on Dec. 18. / photo by Charlie Neuman * U-T San Diego

When the northern white rhinoceros Angalifu died at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park last week, he left his species a step closer to extinction. Only five of his kind remain, most of them elderly.

However, the gentle, two-ton animal also left behind a part of himself that may let scientists breathe new life into the imperiled species. They plan to use DNA samples preserved in the San Diego Frozen Zoo to create more white rhinos.

In their most ambitious vision something that has never been tried for any creature other than lab mice the researchers aim to coax skin cells from Angalifu and others of his kind to become stem cells, and then sperm and eggs, and then implant the embryos in surrogate rhinos.

This approach would go beyond cloning by producing more genetic diversity in the resulting offspring. Its unclear how long scientists will need to achieve the unprecedented feat, but they remain committed to the years-long effort.

Its really brilliant in retrospect that when animals die, you can freeze some of their cells and theyll last forever, said Jeanne Loring, a stem cell pioneer at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla who is a member of the project.

Angalifu came to the San Diego Zoo in 1990, joining two females, Nola and Noti, who had arrived a year earlier. The easygoing animals were favorites with zookeepers, who enjoyed training them and scratching their thick but sensitive hides.

Northern white rhinos, which once roamed central Africa in Chad, Uganda, Sudan and the Central African Republic, have been nearly wiped out by civil war and poaching. Their horns are valued as dagger handles and are mistakenly seen as an aphrodisiac or medicinal aid.

Researchers and zoo officials in several countries decided to try to preserve the species through captive breeding of the few remaining northern white rhinoceroses.

The San Diego Zoo Safari Park had succeeded in breeding southern white rhinos, a close relative of the northern variety. Nearly 100 southern white calves have been born at the facility.

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stem cell therapy Nephrology Perspectives.Prof. Hussein Sheashaa 18.12.2014 – Video



stem cell therapy Nephrology Perspectives.Prof. Hussein Sheashaa 18.12.2014
stem cell therapy Nephrology Perspectives.Prof. Hussein Sheashaa 18.12.2014.

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LCT completes patient implants in Parkinsons trial

LCT completes patient implants in Parkinsons trial

Sydney & Auckland, 15 December 2014 – Living Cell Technologies Limited today announced that the final patient has been successfully implanted in its Phase I/IIa clinical trial of regenerative cell therapy NTCELL for Parkinsons disease. The operation took place at Auckland City Hospital last week.

The Phase I/IIa clinical trial, led by Dr Barry Snow, is an open-label investigation of the safety and clinical effects of NTCELL in patients who no longer respond to current therapy. Dr Snow MBChB, FRACP, FRCPC, leads the Auckland Movement Disorders Clinic at the Auckland District Health Board and is an internationally recognised clinician and researcher in Parkinsons disease.

LCT anticipates presenting the results of the 26-week trial at the 19th International Congress of Parkinsons Disease and Movement Disorders in San Diego in June 2015.

Dr Ken Taylor, chief executive, notes that the success of the implant procedure means that LCTs clinical programme remains on track.

The treatment phase of the trial has been completed on schedule. We believe NTCELL has the potential to be the first disease-modifying treatment for patients who are failing the current conventional treatment for Parkinsons disease, said Dr Taylor.

About Living Cell Technologies Living Cell Technologies (LCT) is an Australasian biotechnology company researching and developing cell therapies to treat diseases with high unmet clinical need. LCTs lead product NTCELL is an alginate coated capsule containing clusters of neonatal porcine choroid plexus cells. After transplantation NTCELL functions as a biological factory producing factors to promote new central nervous system growth and repair disease induced nerve degeneration.

NTCELL is in Phase I/IIa clinical trial in New Zealand for the treatment of Parkinsons disease. It has the potential to be used in a number of other central nervous system indications such as Huntingtons, Alzheimers and motor neurone diseases.

LCTs proprietary encapsulation technology, IMMUPEL, allows cell therapies to be used without the need for co-treatment with drugs that suppress the immune system.

LCT holds a 50% interest in Diatranz Otsuka Limited which is developing a cell therapy for type 1 diabetes.

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Being homosexual is only partly due to gay gene, research fi – Video



Being homosexual is only partly due to gay gene, research fi
REBELLION. NEWS .SOCIAL. MEDIA .INJUSTICE HOST AND JOURNALIST DAVID CALL 1(802)282-8788 DAVIDCALL1965@GMAIL.COM 1(802)282-8788 http://rebellionnewssocialmedi…

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Scientists demonstrate technique for editing genome in sperm-producing adult stem cells

Scientists at Indiana University and colleagues at Stanford and the University of Texas have demonstrated a technique for “editing” the genome in sperm-producing adult stem cells, a result with powerful potential for basic research and for gene therapy.

The researchers completed a “proof of concept” experiment in which they created a break in the DNA strands of a mutant gene in mouse cells, then repaired the DNA through a process called homologous recombination, replacing flawed segments with correct ones.

The study involved spermatogonial stem cells, which are the foundation for the production of sperm and are the only adult stem cells that contribute genetic information to the next generation. Repairing flaws in the cells could thus prevent mutations from being passed to future generations.

“We showed a way to introduce genetic material into spermatogonial stem cells that was greatly improved from what had been previously demonstrated,” said Christina Dann, associate scientist in the Department of Chemistry at IU Bloomington and a co-author of the study. “This technique corrects the mutation, theoretically leaving no other mark on the genome.”

The paper, “Genome Editing in Mouse Spermatogonial Stem/Progenitor Cells Using Engineered Nucleases,” was published in the online science journal PLOS-ONE.

The lead author, Danielle Fanslow, carried out the research as an IU research associate and is now a doctoral student at Northwestern University. Additional co-authors are from the Stanford School of Medicine and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

A challenge to the research was the fact that spermatogonial stem cells, like many types of adult stem cells, are notoriously difficult to isolate, culture and work with. It took years of intensive effort by multiple laboratories before conditions were created a decade ago to maintain and propagate the cells.

For the IU research, a primary hurdle was to find a way to make specific, targeted modifications to the mutant mouse gene without the risk of disease caused by random introduction of genetic material. The researchers used specially designed enzymes, called zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to create a double strand break in the DNA and bring about the repair of the gene.

Stem cells that had been modified in the lab were then transplanted into the testes of sterile mice. The transplanted cells grew or colonized within the mouse testes, indicating the stem cells were viable. However, attempts to breed the mice were not successful.

“Whether the failure to produce sperm was a result of abnormalities in the transplanted cells or the recipient testes was unclear,” the researchers write.

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Synthetic Biology Explained | Genetic Engineering | Biology For Students – Video



Synthetic Biology Explained | Genetic Engineering | Biology For Students
planet videos 10th class maths ssc 10th class english lessons 10th class science 10th class education education portal education videos for children educatio…

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Tom B.K. Goldtooth – Indigenous Environmental Justice | Bioneers – Video



Tom B.K. Goldtooth – Indigenous Environmental Justice | Bioneers
Native American global leader and Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network Tom Goldtooth shows that at the root of indigenous survival is gratitude for the generosity of Mother…

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GENETIC ENGINEERING BIOTECHAWESOME – Video



GENETIC ENGINEERING BIOTECHAWESOME
based on journal paper “gene cloning and soluble expression of Aspergillus niger phytase in E.coli via chaperone co-expression (Ushasree et al.)”

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GMO trees: Saving the American Chestnut tree [erv]

Ive mentioned this technology on ERV before:

Saving the American Chestnut tree from extinction with GMOs

Well the scientists involved think they have finally done it. They have finally made American Chestnut trees resistant to the blight that is literally driving the species to extinction:

Breakthrough at SUNY-ESF: Genetic engineering may save the nearly extinct American chestnut

After 25 years of research, a pair of professors at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry say they have used a gene from wheat to create an American chestnut that could withstand the blight that wiped out up to 5 billion of the trees in the United States.

It is tremendously satisfying to reach this level of success, said ESF professor Chuck Maynard, who worked with fellow professor William Powell to build the blight-resistant tree.

Like how GMO Papaya saved Regular Papaya from extinction, its possible that GMO American Chestnut has not only saved the species from extinction, but also can save Regular American Chestnut. Of course it depends on how the blight is spread, but like papaya, perhaps planting armies of GMO Chestnut around Regular Chestnut trees can provide a buffer to keep the Regular trees blight-free.

It is *amazing*. I LOVE THE FUTURE!!!!

But not everyone is so excited.

Some people would rather the American Chestnut tree go extinct, than have the species survive unclean.

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GMO trees: Saving the American Chestnut tree [erv]

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Centres leading genes project named

Eleven English centres that will spearhead a genetic revolution in the NHS have been named.

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NHS to start era of DNA-medicine

The NHS is setting up 11 centres aimed at unlocking the secrets of DNA and developing drugs to target cancer and rare genetic diseases.

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NHS starts new era of DNA medicine

ITV Report 22 December 2014 at 1:26am Credit: Christoph Bock/Max Planck Institute for Informatics

More than ten years since scientists completed the first sequence of the human genome, today the genetic era will make its grand entrance into mainstream clinical care.

This morning, NHS England launched its 100,000 Genomes Project, a three-year plan to sequence the entire genetic code of thousands of patients with cancers and rare diseases.

The latter includes thousands of conditions that are often named after first doctor or scientist to describe the symptoms in a patient and can involve everything from neurological to muscular or behavioural problems. They are debilitating, often inherited and can shorten life but usually defy doctors trying to identify the biological causes.

The potential for all this genetic information is huge. As well as insights into how cancers and rare diseases work and how they progress, knowing which genetic variations a person has will help doctors work out ways to personalise their treatment by giving them drugs, for example, that specifically target particular problematic genetic mutations. This already happens to some extent in the NHS with drugs such as Herceptin for some types of breast cancer but the potential to improve so-called precision medicine using genetic information is vast.

Genomes have always held the promise to be the cornerstone of healthcare in the 21st century, ever since the draft of the first human genome was published in 2000. The international Human Genome Project (HGP) was a staggering achievement, taking hundreds of researchers more than a decade to piece together the 3 billion letters of the human genetic code, at a cost of around $3bn.

Today, we are learning the language in which God created life, said President Bill Clinton on the morning of 26 June 2000, when the draft of the first human genome sequence was formally announced:

We are gaining ever more awe for the complexity, the beauty, the wonder of God’s most divine and sacred gift. With this profound new knowledge, humankind is on the verge of gaining immense, new power to heal.

Genome science will have a real impact on all our lives and even more, on the lives of our children. It will revolutionize the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of most, if not all, human diseases.

Bill Clinton

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300m bid to find new cancer cures by mapping our DNA: Unlocking genetic code could lead to faster and more accurate …

Cancer treatment could be transformed by project to read our DNA Scientists hope it will lead to faster and more accurate diagnosis Predicted genetic revolution will make chemotherapy obsolete in 20 years Project launched today aims to read genetic blueprint of 75,000 volunteers

By Fiona Macrae, Science Correspondent for the Daily Mail

Published: 19:06 EST, 21 December 2014 | Updated: 19:37 EST, 21 December 2014

Cancer treatment could be transformed by a landmark project to read the DNA of thousands of men, women and children.

Scientists believe that unlocking secrets deep in patients’ genetic code will lead to faster and more accurate diagnosis, speed the development of ‘wonder’ drugs and mean better use is made of existing medicines.

It is even predicted that the genetic revolution will make chemotherapy obsolete within 20 years.

The value of genetic testing is demonstrated by Angelina Jolie’s experience. Testing revealed that the Hollywood actress carries a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, meaning she had an 87 per cent risk of developing breast cancer and a 50 per cent risk of ovarian cancer. The data led Miss Jolie, 39, to have a preventative double mastectomy

The treatment of rare genetic diseases is also set to benefit from the 100,000 Genomes Project, which will combine genetic data with information from health records to give Britain ‘the greatest healthcare system in the world’.

Sir Bruce Keogh, the NHS’s medical director, said the 300million initiative puts the UK in a position to ‘unlock a series of secrets about devastating diseases which have remained hidden for centuries and to unlock those on behalf of the whole of humankind’.

Professor Mark Caulfield, the project’s chief scientist, said: ‘If there was just one medicine that came out of this programme that would be well worth the investment.’

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Modyssey – Ep 30 – Advanced Genetics, mejorando mi ADN – Video



Modyssey – Ep 30 – Advanced Genetics, mejorando mi ADN
Seguimos nuestra aventura pica en Modyssey Modpack! Hay un nuevo peligro tras cada esquina! Web: http://www.themodyssey.com/ Descarga del Modpack: …

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Perfect Genetics Challenge – Part 38 – First official wedding party – Video



Perfect Genetics Challenge – Part 38 – First official wedding party
Open for info links — Thumbs up if you enjoyed this part and Subscribe for more! No more private wedding or ghetto backyard style, we are throwing a special wedding party at a nice venue/lot…

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The Sims 4: Perfect Genetics Legacy [Part 12] – Video



The Sims 4: Perfect Genetics Legacy [Part 12]
We are back with the Holmes clan, and with their baby on the way Marshall and Kaydence are spending quality time together. They are working on new skills and just enjoying each others company….

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Modsauce Episode 2 Advanced Genetics! – Video



Modsauce Episode 2 Advanced Genetics!
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World Deception – Genetics And Censorship (04) – Video



World Deception – Genetics And Censorship (04)
Creator of this serie – Youtube-user chemlin – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW1ELHQMq-RFZhtOf6dVObg Back-up channel for OnderKoffer II.

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MAY 6, 2014 – MS education program – an A-Z of Information on Emerging therapies and Sympt – Video



MAY 6, 2014 – MS education program – an A-Z of Information on Emerging therapies and Sympt
MAY 6, 2014 – MS education program – an A-Z of Information on Emerging therapies and Symptom Mgt Many experts believe some of the first major clinical and commercial successes using cell and…

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Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have for the first time treated myocardial infarction with telomerase by designing a very innovative strategy: a gene therapy that reactivates the telomerase gene only in the heart of adult mice, thus increasing survival rates in those animals by 17 % following a heart attack.

Christian Br and Bruno Bernardes de Jess, researchers in Maria Blasco’s Group at CNIO, have worked alongside several Units from the CNIO Biotechnology Programme and the teams of Ftima Bosch (the Autonomous University of Barcelona) and Kai Wollert (Hannover Faculty of Medicine, Germany). “Our work suggests that the activation of telomerase could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent heart failure following myocardial infarction,” say the authors of the study published today in Nature Communications.

“We have discovered that following a myocardial infarction, hearts that express telomerase show less heart dilatation, better ventricular function and smaller scars from the heart attack; these cardiac events are associated with an increased survival of 17 % compared to control animals,” they say.

Furthermore, everything points to cardiomyocytes–the cells responsible for heart beating–being regenerated in those hearts with telomerase, a long searched-for goal in post-heart-attack therapy. The regeneration of heart muscle would counter the formation of scars as a consequence of the heart attack, a tough tissue that hinders cardiac function and increases the likelihood of heart failure.

“One of the aims of cardiology when treating myocardial infarction and preventing heart failure is efficient cardiac regeneration, but up until now there have not been any significant advances in this sense,” explain the authors.

They remind us that heart failure is the most common cause of death and illness in the world, and that one of its main risk factors–of cardiovascular disease generally–is ageing: the process not only causes changes to the heart that make it more likely to fail, but it also reduces its capacity to regenerate itself.

GENE THERAPY IN ADULTS

The study published today is part of another in which the same CNIO Group developed a genetic technique, in 2012, to reintroduce the telomerase gene in an adult organism. It was then shown that thanks to their renewed capacity to synthesise telomerase, mice lived 40 % longer. Now the authors explore the hypothesis that, if telomerase delays ageing, it may also combat diseases related to ageing, like heart attacks.

Telomerase is able to reset a cell’s biological clock by rebuilding telomeres, the protein hoods that protect the ends of chromosomes. Telomeres progressively shorten every time the cell divides, until they reach a critical length, at which point they cannot carry out their protective function. Then the cell stops dividing and ages. At the whole-body level, telomere shortening leads to ageing-related diseases, including cardiac dysfunction in both mice and human beings.

Telomerase prevents this shortening of the telomeres, but in the vast majority of cells in the body it only does so before birth; adult cells, exceptions aside, do not contain telomerase.

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Stem Cell Therapy in Pune | Stem Cell Treatment | Inamdar …

The potential of SCs to replace dead or damaged cells in any tissue of the body heralds the advent of a new field of medicine that is delivering cures for diseases now thought to be untreatable

Stem cell therapy represents a promising avenue for the treatment of disorders like

Q1: What are stem cells? Answer: Stem cells are class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialized cell types .They have the unique properties of self renewal and differentiation. Differentiation property of stem cells help them to form another type of cell with more specialized function such as brain cell, red blood cell or muscle cell and also the entire organ. During the foetal development, cells divide, migrate, specialize and form the organ. After birth, stem cells are also present in bone marrow which can be used to treat various diseases.

Q2: Which disorders can be treated using Stem Cells? Answer: Currently stem cells are being used successfully to treat various (disorders) diseases like Cerebral palsy, Spinal Cord Injury, Traumatic brain injury, Paralysis, Brain Stroke Osteoarthritis, Autism etc. Apart from this, stem cells can be used to treat liver disorders and Diabetes.

Q3: How is Stem Cell Therapy carried out? Answer: Stem Cell therapy is a very simple and painless process.Mesenchymal stem cells are injected directly into the synivial fluid in the knee. The whole process is carried out very carefully under sterile conditions.

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FDA approves new ovarian cancer drug

Opening a new chapter in the use of genomic science to fight cancer, the Food & Drug Administration on Friday approved olaparib, a medication for advanced ovarian cancer associated with a defective BRCA gene.

The new drug, to be marketed under the commercial name Lynparza, was found in a preliminary clinical trial to shrink or eliminate ovarian tumors in women whose cancers bore a specific genetic fingerprint and who had undergone at least three prior lines of chemotherapy.

Based on Lynparza’s “existing objective response rate and duration of response data,” the drug safety agency granted the medication’s maker, Astra-Zeneca, an “accelerated” approval. Roughly a third of women with the genetic mutation targeted by Lynparza saw partial shrinkage or complete disappearance of their ovarian tumors over an average of eight months.

At the same time, the FDA granted marketing approval for a “companion diagnostic” that will help identify women whose advanced ovarian cancer is likely to respond to the drug. That test, BRACAnalysis CDx, is made by Myriad Genetics Inc. To be a candidate for Lynparza, a patient must take the test and show positive for a specific mutation of the BRCA gene, which confers a high risk of both breast and ovarian cancer.

“Today’s approval constitutes the first of a new class of drugs for treating ovarian cancer,” Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in the news release.

Pazdur called Lynparza “an example of how a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease can lead to targeted, more personalized treatment.”

Lynparza is the first of a new class of drugs called poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which work by blocking the action of an enzyme that helps repair DNA. In certain tumor cells, such as those seen in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, blocking this enzyme can lead to cell death.

“Its really opening a whole new avenue of therapy,” said Dr. M. William Audeh, a medical oncologist and geneticist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Samuel Oschin Cancer Institute in Los Angeles. “This drug is working in a fundamentally different way than chemotherapy: This is a cancer treatment thats been designed to hit this kind of inherited genetic weakness in the cancer itself.”

Because PARP inhibitors such as Lynparza target a cancer’s genetic Achilles’ heel, they appear to hold out the particular promise of driving some patients’ cancer into remission entirely, said Audeh, an investigator on the Astra-Zeneca-sponsored trial assessed by the FDA.

“All of us whove done these trials over seven years have some patients whove been in long-term remission. Thats not something you see very often with chemotherapy,” he added.

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Crohn's, Colitis May Have Genetic Underpinnings, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Dec. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, may be inherited, researchers report.

The findings, published recently in the journal Genome Medicine, could help in efforts to prevent the disease and treat the 1.6 million Americans with Crohn’s or colitis, the study authors added.

“The intestinal bacteria, or ‘gut microbiome,’ you develop at a very young age can have a big impact on your health for the rest of your life,” lead author Dan Knights, an assistant professor in the department of computer science and engineering and the Biotechnology Institute at the University of Minnesota, said in a journal news release.

“We have found groups of genes that may play a role in shaping the development of imbalanced gut microbes,” he explained.

The study of 474 adults with inflammatory bowel disease who live in the United States, Canada and the Netherlands found a link between the participants’ DNA and their gut bacteria DNA. The Crohn’s and colitis patients also had less variety of gut bacteria and more opportunistic bacteria than the general population.

The findings are an important step in creating new drugs for the treatment of Crohn’s and colitis, the researchers said.

The investigators also found that antibiotics can worsen the imbalances in intestinal bacteria associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

“In many cases, we’re still learning how these bacteria influence our risk of disease, but understanding the human genetics component is a necessary step in unraveling the mystery,” Knights said.

Previous research has identified associations between gut bacteria and increased risks for health problems such as diabetes, autism, heart disease and some types of cancer, the researchers said.

— Robert Preidt

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Download Medical Genetics With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access 4e MEDICAL GENETICS JORDE PDF – Video



Download Medical Genetics With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access 4e MEDICAL GENETICS JORDE PDF
Download the complete version here:http://bit.ly/1wpszqz.

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Cancer Genetics: Seven Commercialized DNA-Based Cancer Diagnostics – Video



Cancer Genetics: Seven Commercialized DNA-Based Cancer Diagnostics
Host Dave Gentry interviews Panna Sharma, President and CEO of Cancer Genetics (NasdaqCM: CGIX), an emerging leader in DNA-based cancer diagnostics that serv…

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