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BioEngineering IPS Cell Therapy IPS Cell Therapy

Campus Insights: Professor Rashid Bashir, Abel Bliss Professor and Head, Bioengineering On September 10, 2014, eight faculty members from the Urbana-Champaign campus gave brief presentations to the University of Illinois Board of Trustees on the

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Campus Insights: Professor Matthew Wheeler, Animal Sciences and Bioengineering On Sept. 10, 2014, eight faculty members from the Urbana-Champaign campus gave brief presentations to the University of Illinois Board of Trustees on their r

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The winners generally have no inkling they are under consideration. The money, doled out over five years, comes with no strings attached.

Im still processing that this is actually happening, said Bassett, the youngest of this years fellows.

Also among the winners are graphic memoirist and cartoonist Alison Bechdel, who grew up in Lock Haven; jazz composer and saxophonist Steve Coleman, of Allentown; and University of Pittsburgh writing professor and poet Terrance Hayes. Tara Zahra, a 1998 graduate of Swarthmore College, was honored for her work as a historian of modern Europe.

In a group being honored for creative brains, it makes sense that one, Bassett, studies the very quality that makes brains flexible.

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BioEngineering IPS Cell Therapy IPS Cell Therapy

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Stem Cell Therapy Professional Football Player – Video



Stem Cell Therapy Professional Football Player
James Lee a Professional Football player is back in action thanks to stem cell therapy and Dr. Dennis M. Lox MD. Dr. Lox | http://www.drloxstemcells.com | (844) 440…

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Stem Cell Therapy Professional Football Player – Video

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9 Global Options Stem Cell Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease – Video



9 Global Options Stem Cell Therapy for Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease is a neuromuscular condition that affects millions of people around the world. Uncontrollable movement of the body muscles along with strong shaking and trembling of extremiti…

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Gene responsible for traits involved in diabetes discovered

A collaborative research team led by Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) scientists has identified a new gene associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in rats, mice and in humans. The findings are published in the September issue of Genetics.

Leah Solberg Woods, Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics at MCW and a researcher in the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Research Institute, led the study and is the corresponding author of the paper.

The authors of the paper identified a gene called Tpcn2 in which a variant was associated with fasting glucose levels in a rat model. Studies in Tpcn2 knockout mice also demonstrated the difference in fasting glucose levels as well as insulin response between the knockout animals and regular mice. Finally, Dr. Woods’ team identified variants within Tpcn2 associated with fasting insulin in humans. Tpcn2 is a lysosomal calcium channel that likely plays a role in insulin signaling. Glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction are key underlying causes of type 2 diabetes.

“Genome-wide association studies in humans have identified 60+ genes linked to type 2 diabetes; however, these genes explain only a small portion of heritability in diabetes studies. As we continue to identify genes and variants of interest, we will evaluate them in multiple models to understand the mechanism of disease,” said Dr. Solberg Woods.

According to the American Diabetes Association, 29 million Americans have diabetes — more than nine percent of the total population. It is the 7th leading cause of death, and experts estimate diabetes is an underreported cause of death because of the comorbidities and complications associated with the disease.

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The above story is based on materials provided by Medical College of Wisconsin. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Gene responsible for traits involved in diabetes discovered

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New gene associated with 'diabetes' traits found

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How Much Do You Know About GMOs? – Video



How Much Do You Know About GMOs?
Did you know that farmers and gardeners have been genetically modifying their plants to express desired traits through selective breeding for thousands of years? From taste, color and hardiness…

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Harnessing Genetics to Identify Druggable Targets and Causes of Off-Target Cardiotoxicity – Video



Harnessing Genetics to Identify Druggable Targets and Causes of Off-Target Cardiotoxicity
Christopher Newton-Cheh, MD, MPH Assistant Professor of Medicine Harvard Medical School Director, Electrocardiography Laboratory Faculty, Cardiovascular Research Center Center for Human Genetic…

By: Duke Clinical Research Institute

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Harnessing Genetics to Identify Druggable Targets and Causes of Off-Target Cardiotoxicity – Video

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Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine Collaboration with National University Ireland Galway – Video



Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine Collaboration with National University Ireland Galway
Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine and National University Ireland Galway have signed a formal MOU to pave the way for joint clinical trials in regenerative medicine. They will focus…

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First-in-man procedure utilizes a new method of stem cell delivery

Frankfurt, Germany (PRWEB) September 19, 2014

The Translational Research Institute TRI Medical announced today that its new ND Infusion Catheter is being used in a first-in-man procedure at the University of Frankfurt.

The study commenced on September 4th, 2014 at the University of Frankfurt, Department of Cardiology. The use of the new catheter demonstrated a number of advancements in the delivery of regenerative therapeutics, commonly known as stem cells. We are at the forefront of revolutionizing stem cell delivery to the heart, TRI Medicals Nabil Dib, MD, Msc, offered. The ND Infusion Catheter provides safety and potential efficacy. The catheter also reduces the procedure time to approximately 15 minutes; enabling patients to walk and resume activities in about 2 hours, Dr. Dib continued.

The renowned German Cardiology Center at the University of Frankfurt has extensive experience with the development of cardiac cell-based regenerative therapeutics. Prof. Dr. Andreas M. Zeiher, Chairman of the Department of Cardiology at the University of Frankfurt stated The catheter provides the unique potential to precisely regulate coronary blood flow, while administering cells directly into the heart thus improving safety and potentially efficacy. The innovative design of the catheter’s balloon accommodates different vessel sizes, avoiding the need to use multiple catheters, reducing potential risks associated with exchanging the balloon catheter when treating different coronary arteries in an individual patient.

Prior to the first-in-man procedure, extensive cell compatibility testing of bone marrow derived cells with the ND Infusion Catheter revealed that the catheter preserved cell viability and functionality, Stefanie Dimmeler, PhD and Director of the Institute of Cardiovascular Regeneration, Centre of Molecular Medicine stated. The testing proved that the cells are compatible with the ND Infusion Catheter. We see this as potential improvements in safety and clinical outcomes related to cell function and efficacy in patients, Dr. Dimmeler offered.

Safety was top-of-mind when we initiated the first-in-man procedure in Frankfurt. We are elated to report that the procedures outcomes were successful, Dr. Dib stated. Earlier studies revealed that the ND Infusion Catheter reduces cellular clumping, preserves cell viability, improves dispersion and reduces radial forces on the vessel walls during balloon inflation; which collectively might improve patient safety and clinical outcomes.

TRI Medicals Ron Anson, Vice President of Business Development shared The catheters unique design features provide physicians with a valuable new tool in the delivery of specified fluids such as stem cells. We expect to see significant growth in the stem cell research marketplace for the new, state-of-the-art ND Infusion Catheter.

ABOUT TRI Medical TRI Medical is a privately held, medical device development company. TRI Medical is dedicated to providing a pathway to regulatory approval that is efficient, predictable and cost effective.

#####

Media inquiries regarding TRI Medical, its capabilities and for additional information regarding the ND Infusion Catheter contact: DeAnn Dana Phone: 480.309.2884 Email: DDana(at)TRImedical.com TRI Medical website: http://www.trimedical.com

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Capricor Presents Safety and Preliminary Efficacy Results From ALLSTAR Phase I Clinical Trial at TCT 2014

LOS ANGELES — Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. , a biotechnology company focused on developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, presented an abstract entitled "ALLogeneic …

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Capricor Presents Safety and Preliminary Efficacy Results From ALLSTAR Phase I Clinical Trial at TCT 2014

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Bone Marrow Recipient Meets Donor Who Saved His Life

Two men who changed each others lives forever by being on the giving and receiving ends of a bone marrow transplant met for the first time today and had their first chance to say, Thank you, face-to-face.

Thank you so much, Joe Yannantuono, 33, said to his bone marrow donor, Justin Jenkins, 35, as he embraced him in a hug in a live, emotional meeting on Good Morning America.

Yannantuono, not very long ago, was waging a two-year long battle for his life against stage 4 lymphoma.

WATCH: Robin Roberts Celebrates 1-Year Anniversary of Bone Marrow Transplant

Toddler Meets Life-Saving Bone Marrow Donor

As his wife, Christine Buono, and his 4-year-old son, JJ Yannantuono, stood by his side, the family, from Staten Island, N.Y., got the unbelievable news that a man in Texas, a stranger, was a rare 10 for 10 genetic bone marrow match.

That stranger in Texas, Jenkins, of Dallas, had registered to be a bone marrow donor by chance 15 years ago when he was 21-years-old and donated blood because they were offering free snacks.

Soon after Jenkins was found to be a match, his stem cells were transported by airplane to New York and transplanted into Yannatuonos body in December 2012 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

For more than one year after the successful transplant, Yannantuono had no idea whose cells he was now carrying in his body.

As Yannantuono was rebuilding his life, Jenkins life was thrown a tragic curveball. His mother, who raised him on her own and had been a big part of his donation journey, was killed in a car crash.

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Bone Marrow Recipient Meets Donor Who Saved His Life

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Molecule that boosts cord blood stem cells could up transplants to treat leukemia

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New molecule allows for up to 10-fold increase in stem cell transplants

Investigators from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at the Universit de Montral have just published, in the journal Science, the announcement of the discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. Umbilical cord stem cells are used for transplants aimed at curing a number of blood-related diseases, including leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma. For many patients this therapy comprises a treatment of last resort.

Directed by Dr. Guy Sauvageau, principal investigator at IRIC and hematologist at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, the research has the potential to multiply by 10 the number of cord blood units available for a transplant in humans. In addition, it will considerably reduce the complications associated with stem cell transplantation. And it will be particularly useful for non-Caucasian patients for whom compatible donors are difficult to identify.

A clinical study using this molecule, named UM171 in honor of the Universit de Montral, and a new type of bioreactor developed for stem culture in collaboration with the University of Toronto will be initiated in December 2014 at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital.

According to Dr. Guy Sauvageau, “This new molecule, combined with the new bioreactor technology, will allow thousands of patients around the world access to a safer stem cell transplant. Considering that many patients currently cannot benefit from a stem cell transplant for lack of matching donors, this discovery looks to be highly promising for the treatment of various types of cancer.”

The Centre of Excellence for Cellular Therapy at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital will serve as production unit for these stem cells, and grafts will then be distributed to patients in Montreal, Quebec City and Vancouver for this first Canadian clinical study. Tangible results should be available one year later, that is, in December 2015. The significance of this new discovery is such that over time, conclusive clinical results could revolutionize the treatment of leukemia and other blood-related illnesses.

“These extraordinary advances result from the efforts of a remarkable team that includes extremely gifted students and postdoctoral investigators working in the IRIC laboratories,” adds Dr. Guy Sauvageau. “Among them, the first authors of this publication: Iman Fars, doctoral student, and Jalila Chagraoui, research officer, along with the professionals in IRIC’s medical chemistry core facility under the direction of Anne Marinier, who optimized the therapeutic properties of this new molecule.”

Context

Umbilical cord blood from newborn children is an excellent source of hematopoietic stem cells for stem cell transplants, since their immune system is still immature and the stem cells have a lower probability of inducing an adverse immune reaction in the recipient.

Furthermore, it is not necessary for the immunological compatibility between donor and recipient to be perfect, unlike in a bone marrow transplant. However, in most cases the number of stem cells obtained from an umbilical cord is much too low for treating an adult, and its use is confined above all to the treatment of children. With the new molecule UM171 it will be possible to multiply stem cells in culture and to produce enough of them to treat adults, especially those who are not Caucasian, and who because of the lack of donors have limited access to transplants.

Collaborators from the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, the British Columbia Cancer Agency, the Ontario Cancer Institute and the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center also played an important role in evaluating the biological properties of this new molecule, and those from the University of Toronto in developing the bioreactor.

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New molecule allows for up to 10-fold increase in stem cell transplants

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Molecule boosts stem cells in cord blood: Canadian study

Canadian doctors have found a way to boost the number of stem cells in umbilical cord blood so patients with leukemia and cancers could receive transplants.

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Molecule boosts stem cells in cord blood: Canadian study

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World Breakthrough: A New Molecule Allows for an Increase in Stem Cell Transplants

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Newswise Investigators from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at the Universit de Montral have just published, in the prestigious magazine Science, the announcement of the discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. Umbilical cord stem cells are used for transplants aimed at curing a number of blood-related diseases, including leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma. For many patients this therapy comprises a treatment of last resort.

Directed by Dr. Guy Sauvageau, principal investigator at IRIC and hematologist at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, this world breakthrough has the potential to multiply by 10 the number of cord blood units available for a transplant in humans. In addition, it will considerably reduce the complications associated with stem cell transplantation. And it will be particularly useful for non-Caucasian patients for whom compatible donors are difficult to identify.

A clinical study using this molecule, named UM171 in honor of the Universit de Montral, and a new type of bioreactor developed for stem culture in collaboration with the University of Toronto will be initiated in December 2014 at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital.

According to Dr. Guy Sauvageau, This new molecule, combined with the new bioreactor technology, will allow thousands of patients around the world access to a safer stem cell transplant. Considering that many patients currently cannot benefit from a stem cell transplant for lack of matching donors, this discovery looks to be highly promising for the treatment of various types of cancer.

The Centre of Excellence for Cellular Therapy at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital will serve as production unit for these stem cells, and grafts will then be distributed to patients in Montreal, Quebec City and Vancouver for this first Canadian clinical study. Tangible results should be available one year later, that is, in December 2015. The significance of this new discovery is such that over time, conclusive clinical results could revolutionize the treatment of leukemia and other blood-related illnesses.

These extraordinary advances result from the efforts of a remarkable team that includes extremely gifted students and postdoctoral investigators working in the IRIC laboratories, adds Dr. Guy Sauvageau. Among them, the first authors of this publication: Iman Fars, doctoral student, and Jalila Chagraoui, research officer, along with the professionals in IRICs medical chemistry core facility under the direction of Anne Marinier, who optimized the therapeutic properties of this new molecule.

Context

Umbilical cord blood from newborn children is an excellent source of hematopoietic stem cells for stem cell transplants, since their immune system is still immature and the stem cells have a lower probability of inducing an adverse immune reaction in the recipient.

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World Breakthrough: A New Molecule Allows for an Increase in Stem Cell Transplants

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New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found a way to boost dramatically the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. Using the new technique in mice, the researchers increased the number of stem cells obtained from adult skin cells by more than 20-fold compared with the standard method. They say their technique is efficient and reliable, and thus should generally accelerate research aimed at using stem cells to generate virtually any tissue. Stem cells are immature or uncommitted cells that are theoretically capable of becoming any cell type.

“This big boost in efficiency gives us an opportunity now to study stem cell programming mechanisms at high resolution,” says Matthias Stadtfeld, PhD, assistant professor of cell biology and a member of the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine and the Helen L. and Martin S. Kimmel Center for Stem Cell Biology at NYU Langone Medical Center, who led the research.

“This is a very exciting advance,” says Ruth Lehmann, PhD, director of the Kimmel Center for Stem Cell Biology and the Skirball Institute at NYU Langone and chair of the Department of Cell Biology. “The new technology developed by the Stadtfeld lab to reprogram differentiated cells efficiently and effectively brings the prospect of stem cell technology for safe use in regenerative medicine ever so much closer.”

The standard method for reprogramming skin, blood, or other tissue-specific cell types into “induced pluripotent stem cells” (iPSCs) was reported in 2006 by the laboratory of Kyoto University’s Shinya Yamanaka, who later won a Nobel Prize for the achievement. The method involves the artificial expression of four key genes dubbed OKSM (for Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and myc) whose collective activity slowly prods cells into an immature state much like that of an early embryonic cell.

In principle, one could take a sample of cells from a person, induce the cells to become iPSCs, then multiply the iPSCs in a lab dish and stimulate them to mature towards desired adult cell types such as blood, brain or heart-which then could be used to replace injured or diseased tissue in that same individual.

But there are many formidable technical obstacles, among which is the low efficiency of currently used protocols. Converting most cell types into stable iPSCs occurs at rates of 1 percent or less, and the process can take weeks.

Researchers throughout the world have been searching for ways to boost this efficiency, and in some cases have reported significant gains. These procedures, however, often alter vital cellular genes, which may cause problems for potential therapies. For the new study, reported online today in Stem Cell Reports, Dr. Stadtfeld and his laboratory team decided to take a less invasive approach and investigate chemical compounds that transiently modulate enzymes that are present in most cells. “We especially wanted to know if these compounds could be combined to obtain stem cells at high efficiency,” Dr. Stadtfeld says.

Two of these compounds influence well known signaling pathways, called Wnt and TGF-, which regulate multiple growth-related processes in cells. The third is vitamin C (also known as ascorbic acid). Best known as a powerful antioxidant, the vitamin was recently discovered to assist in iPSC induction by activating enzymes that remodel chromatin-the spiral scaffold for DNA-to regulate gene expression.

Simon Vidal, a graduate student in the Stadtfeld lab, and Bhishma Amlani, a postdoctoral researcher, looked first at mouse skin fibroblasts, the most common cell type used for iPSC research. Adding to fibroblasts engineered to express OKSM either vitamin C, a compound to activate Wnt signaling, or a compound to inhibit TGF- signaling increased iPSC-induction efficiency weakly to about 1% after a week of cell culture. Combining any two worked a bit better. But combining all three brought the efficiency to about 80 percent in the same period of time.

In another series of experiments the team worked with blood progenitor cells, which usually replace blood cells lost after injury or infection. The OKSM method on its own can slowly convert these cells to stem cells with up to 30 percent efficiency. Using OKSM together with the three compounds brought the efficiency to nearly 100 percent in less than a week. The researchers also achieved nearly 100-percent yield in mouse liver progenitor cells.

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New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

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Stem cell revolution gets closer

Edgar Irastorza was just 31 when his heart stopped beating in October 2008.

A Miami property manager, Irastorza had recently gained weight as his wife’s third pregnancy progressed. “I kind of got pregnant, too,” he said.

During a workout one day, he felt short of breath and insisted that friends rush him to the hospital. Minutes later, his pulse flatlined. He survived the heart attack, but the scar tissue that resulted cut his heart’s pumping ability by a third. He couldn’t pick up his children. He fell asleep every night wondering if he would wake up in the morning.

Desperation motivated Irastorza to volunteer for a highly unusual medical research trial: getting stem cells injected directly into his heart. “I just trusted my doctors and the science behind it, and said, ‘This is my only chance,’ ” he said recently.

Over the last five years, by studying stem cells in lab dishes, test animals and intrepid patients like Irastorza, researchers have brought the vague, grandiose promises of stem cell therapies closer to reality.

Stem cells broke into the public consciousness in the early 1990s, alluring for their potential to help the body beat back diseases of degeneration like Alzheimer’s, and to grow new parts to treat conditions like spinal cord injuries.

Progress has been slow. But researchers are learning how to best use stem cells, what types to use and how to deliver them to the body findings that are not singularly transformational, but progressive and pragmatic.

As many as 4,500 clinical trials involving stem cells are under way in the United States to treat patients with heart disease, blindness, Parkinson’s, HIV, blood cancers and spinal cord injuries, among other conditions.

Initial studies suggest that stem cell therapy can be delivered safely, said Dr. Ellen Feigal, senior vice president of research and development at the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, the state stem cell agency, which has awarded more than $2 billion toward stem cell research since 2006.

But enthusiasm for stem cells sometimes outstrips the science. When Gov. Rick Perry of Texas had adult stem cells injected into his spine in 2011 for a back injury, his surgeon had never tried the procedure and had no data to support the experiment. A June review in the New England Journal of Medicine found that “platelet-rich plasma” stem cell therapies praised by a number of athletes worked no better than placebos.

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Stem cell revolution gets closer

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Stem cells used in landmark therapy for failing sight

A Japanese woman with macular degeneration is the first person to be treated with induced pluripotent stem cells, made from her own skin

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Stem cells used in landmark therapy for failing sight

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Kickstarter Promo Update Sept 15 2014 – Stem Cell Treatment for Hope, Love and Freedom – Video



Kickstarter Promo Update Sept 15 2014 – Stem Cell Treatment for Hope, Love and Freedom
Hello my name is Sonny, I was born with a nerve disease, a genetic mutation that causes the muscles in my arms, hands, legs and feet to atrophy and to become weak. I now have perfect legs….for…

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Kickstarter Promo Update Sept 15 2014 – Stem Cell Treatment for Hope, Love and Freedom – Video

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Medical Guidelines for Stem Cell Therapy in Australia – Video



Medical Guidelines for Stem Cell Therapy in Australia
Dr Ralph Bright of Macquarie Stem Cells discusses the medical guidelines for practicing Stem Cell Therapy in Australia. http://www.macquariestemcells.com/ https://www.facebook.com/macquariestemcel…

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Medical Guidelines for Stem Cell Therapy in Australia – Video

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History of Stem Cells – Video



History of Stem Cells
Dr Ralph Bright discusses the origins of his interest in Stem Cell therapy and how he discovered their power to heal conditions like Osteoarthritis.

By: Macquarie Stem Cells

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History of Stem Cells – Video

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Stem Cell Therapy | why no more news about embryonic stem cells – Video



Stem Cell Therapy | why no more news about embryonic stem cells
http://www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com Is embryonic stem cell research passe? Next How come no more news about embryonic stem cells? Embryonic stem cells come from human embryos and these…

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Pluristem Pursues Development Strategy in Japan Where New Law Accelerates Path to Market – Video



Pluristem Pursues Development Strategy in Japan Where New Law Accelerates Path to Market
HAIFA, Israel, Sept. 16, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. (PSTI) (TASE:PLTR), a leading developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, announced today it is evaluating…

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Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017

DUBLIN, Sept. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017" report to their offering. Stem cells are …

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Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017

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Stem cells act as 'first aid kits' in repairing damaged immune response

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