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Coalition Duchenne Launches Youtube Interview Series 'Making a Difference in Duchenne'

Newport Beach, California (PRWEB) March 31, 2015

Newport Beach based charity Coalition Duchenne has launched an interview series titled Making a Difference in Duchenne on its Youtube channel (https://www.youtube.com/user/CoalitionDuchenne) focused on individuals making a difference in Duchenne muscular dystrophy research, care, awareness, and education.

The first interview features Dr. Eduardo Marbn MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, talking about cardiac derived stem cells. Dr. Marbn was featured in a November 2011 Economist article Repairing Broken Hearts, read by Coalition Duchenne founder and executive director Catherine Jayasuriya. She lobbied for a focus on Duchenne because cardiac scarring severely compromises the life span of those with the disease. Coalition Duchenne funded successful research applying Marbns stem cell technology to Duchenne. The approach has been clinically proven to mitigate scarring cause by heart attacks. In Marbns therapy, human heart tissue is used to grow specialized heart stem cells, which are injected back into the patients heart.

We need to focus on changing the course of the disease. We lose many young men to cardiac issues. We hope that working with cardiac stem cells is one way we will eventually change that outcome, said Jayasuriya.

The second interview in the Making a Difference in Duchenne series features actor Cody Saintgnue, who plays Brett Talbot in MTVs Teen Wolf. Saintgnue has a unique relationship with Duchenne. He played a young man with muscular dystrophy in his break out role on House MD in 2009. Saintgnue talks about his experience learning to mimic the physicality of a young man with Duchenne, as well as the inspiration he draws from the way those young men overcome many obstacles to live happy, fulfilling lives.

Upcoming interviews will feature: Professor Rachelle Crosbie-Watson from the University of California, Los Angeles, who teaches the first university course focused entirely on Duchenne; Dr. Ron Victor, a Cedars-Sinai cardiologist and researcher looking at the benefits of Cialis and Viagra for Duchenne cardiomyopathy; and, Scotty Bob Morgan, a daredevil wingsuit pilot, who has raised awareness worldwide about Duchenne, flying a specially made Coalition Duchenne wingsuit.

About Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle wasting disease. It is the most common fatal disease that affects children. Duchenne occurs in 1 in 3,500 male births, across all races, cultures and countries. Duchenne is caused by a defect in the gene that codes for the protein dystrophin. This is a vital protein that helps connect the muscle fiber to the cell membranes. Without dystrophin, the muscle cells become unstable, are weakened and lose their functionality. Life expectancy ranges from the mid teenage years to the mid 20s. Their minds are unaffected.

About Coalition Duchenne: Jayasuriya founded Coalition Duchenne in 2010 (http://www.coalitionduchenne.org) to raise global awareness for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, to fund research and to find a cure for Duchenne. Coalition Duchenne is a 501c3 non-profit corporation.

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Coalition Duchenne Launches Youtube Interview Series 'Making a Difference in Duchenne'

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Blood and Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation – The …

Stem cell transplant (also known as bone marrow transplant or BMT) is an established treatment for many cancers and blood diseases once considered incurable. For some types of blood diseases, transplantation is the standard of care. For others, it is only considered if other treatments have not been successful. Ongoing advances in stem cell transplant are expanding its availability and improving outcomes for patients, young and old.

Here at the University of Chicago Medicine, the brightest minds in medicine are ready to meet the needs of all patients considering a stem cell transplant. We offer the latest promising approaches in blood and bone marrow stem cell transplant. Our team is known — and recognized — for our experience and expertise in:

We provide outstanding and compassionate care in a patient-centered environment. The Stem Cell Transplant Unit, located on the top floor of the Center for Care and Discovery, offers the newest technology as well as many thoughtful patient and family amenities. The unit integrates both inpatient and outpatient stem cell transplant care services in one convenient location.

As part of the internationally recognized University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center (UCCCC), we participate in national clinical trials testing new and emerging therapies. A primary site for early-phase clinical trials, we offer our patients access to more new treatment protocols than any other hospital in the region.

As a leading center for advanced care, the University of Chicago Medicine attracts patients from throughout the region, the country and around the world. We provide customized services for patients who travel from other countries. For more information, contact the Center for International Patients.

In the late 1940s, University of Chicago researcher Dr. Leon Jacobson discovered that he could save a mouse, whose bone marrow and spleen had been destroyed with radiation, by transplanting healthy spleen tissue from another mouse. The donated tissue repopulated the marrow and restored production of the blood cells. This groundbreaking work influenced many scientists investigating bone marrow transplant for humans, including the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

For information about stem cell transplant for children and teens, visit the Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant page on the University of Chicago Comer Childrens Hospital website.

UCH_008151 (19)

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Blood and Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation – The …

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Bone marrow stem cells significantly improve healing, tendon durability during rotator cuff surgery

An injection of a patient’s bone marrow stem cells during rotator cuff surgery significantly improved healing and tendon durability, according to a study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).

Each year in the U.S., more than 2 million people have rotator cuff surgery to re-attach their shoulder tendon to the head of the humerus (upper arm bone). Rotator cuff tears can occur during a fall or when lifting an extremely heavy object; however, most tears are the result of aging and overuse.

The French study, of which a portion appeared in the September 2014 issue of International Orthopaedics, included 90 patients who underwent rotator cuff surgery. Researchers tried to make the two groups as equivalent as possible based on rotator cuff tear size, tendon rupture location, dominate shoulder, gender and age. Forty-five of the patients received injections of bone marrow concentrate (BMC) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at the surgical site, and 45 had their rotator cuff repaired or reattached without MSCs.

Patient ultrasound images were obtained each month following surgery for 24 months. In addition, MRI images were obtained of patient shoulders at three and six months following surgery, and at one year, two years, and 10 years following surgery.

At six months, all 45 of the patients who received MSCs had healed rotator cuff tendons, compared to 30 (67 percent) of the patients who did not receive MSCs. The use of bone marrow concentrate also prevented further ruptures or retears. At 10 years after surgery, intact rotator cuffs were found in 39 (87 percent) of the MSC patients, but just 20 (44 percent) of the non-MSC patients.

In addition, “some retears or new tears occurred after one year,” said Philippe Hernigou, MD, an orthopaedic surgeon at the University of Paris and lead study author. “These retears were more frequently associated with the control group patients who were not treated with MSCs.

“While the risk of a retear after arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff has been well documented, publications with long-term follow-up (more than three years) are relatively limited,” said Dr. Hernigou. “Many patients undergoing rotator cuff repair surgery show advanced degeneration of the tendons, which are thinner and atrophic (more likely to degenerate), probably explaining why negative results are so often reported in the literature, with frequent post-operative complications, especially retear. Observations in the MSC treatment group support the potential that MSC treatment has both a short-term and long-term benefit in reducing the rate of tendon retear.”

Source:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

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Bone marrow stem cells significantly improve healing, tendon durability during rotator cuff surgery

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Premature aging of stem cell telomeres, not inflammation, linked to emphysema

Lung diseases like emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis are common among people with malfunctioning telomeres, the “caps” or ends of chromosomes. Now, researchers from Johns Hopkins say they have discovered what goes wrong and why.

Mary Armanios, M.D., an associate professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine., and her colleagues report that some stem cells vital to lung cell oxygenation undergo premature aging — and stop dividing and proliferating — when their telomeres are defective. The stem cells are those in the alveoli, the tiny air exchange sacs where blood takes up oxygen.

In studies of these isolated stem cells and in mice, Armanios’ team discovered that dormant or senescent stem cells send out signals that recruit immune molecules to the lungs and cause the severe inflammation that is also a hallmark of emphysema and related lung diseases.

Until now, Armanios says, researchers and clinicians have thought that “inflammation alone is what drives these lung diseases and have based therapy on anti-inflammatory drugs for the last 30 years.”

But the new discoveries, reported March 30 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest instead that “if it’s premature aging of the stem cells driving this, nothing will really get better if you don’t fix that problem,” Armanios says.

Acknowledging that there are no current ways to treat or replace damaged lung stem cells, Armanios says that knowing the source of the problem can redirect research efforts. “It’s a new challenge that begins with the questions of whether we take on the effort to fix this defect in the cells, or try to replace the cells,” she adds.

Armanios and her team say their study also found that this telomere-driven defect leaves mice extremely vulnerable to anticancer drugs like bleomycin or busulfan that are toxic to the lungs. The drugs and infectious agents like viruses kill off the cells that line the lung’s air sacs. In cases of telomere dysfunction, Armanios explains, the lung stem cells can’t divide and replenish these destroyed cells.

When the researchers gave these drugs to 11 mice with the lung stem cell defect, all became severely ill and died within a month.

This finding could shed light on why “sometimes people with short telomeres may have no signs of pulmonary disease whatsoever, but when they’re exposed to an acute infection or to certain drugs, they develop respiratory failure,” says Armanios. “We don’t think anyone has ever before linked this phenomenon to stem cell failure or senescence.”

In their study, the researchers genetically engineered mice to have a telomere defect that impaired the telomeres in just the lung stem cells in the alveolar epithelium, the layer of cells that lines the air sacs. “In bone marrow or other compartments, when stem cells have short telomeres, or when they age, they just die out,” Armanios says. “But we found that instead, these alveolar cells just linger in the senescent stage.”

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Premature aging of stem cell telomeres, not inflammation, linked to emphysema

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The Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center Announces Adult Stem Cell Public Seminars in Costa Mesa and Sherman Oaks …

Costa Mesa and Sherman Oaks, California (PRWEB) March 31, 2015

The Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center announces a series of free public seminars on the use of adult stem cells for various degenerative and inflammatory conditions. They will be provided by Dr. Thomas A. Gionis, Surgeon-in-Chief.

The seminars will be held on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at 11:00 am, 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm at Ayres Hotel & Suites Costa Mesa/Newport Beach, 325 Bristol Street, Costa Mesa, CA 92626; and Wednesday, April 22, 2015, at 11:00 am, 1:00 pm and 3:00 pm at Hampton Inn, 5638 Sepulveda Blvd., Sherman Oaks, CA 91411. Please RSVP at (949) 679-3889.

The Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center (Irvine and Westlake), along with sister affiliates, the Miami Stem Cell Treatment Center (Miami; Boca Raton; Orlando; The Villages; Sarasota, Florida) and the Manhattan Regenerative Medicine Medical Group (Manhattan, New York), abide by approved investigational protocols using adult adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) which can be deployed to improve patients quality of life for a number of chronic, degenerative and inflammatory conditions and diseases. ADSCs are taken from the patients own adipose (fat) tissue (found within a cellular mixture called stromal vascular fraction (SVF)). ADSCs are exceptionally abundant in adipose tissue. The adipose tissue is obtained from the patient during a 15 minute mini-liposuction performed under local anesthesia in the doctors office. SVF is a protein-rich solution containing mononuclear cell lines (predominantly adult autologous mesenchymal stem cells), macrophage cells, endothelial cells, red blood cells, and important Growth Factors that facilitate the stem cell process and promote their activity.

ADSCs are the bodys natural healing cells – they are recruited by chemical signals emitted by damaged tissues to repair and regenerate the bodys injured cells. The Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center only uses Adult Autologous Stem Cells from a persons own fat No embryonic stem cells are used; and No bone marrow stem cells are used. Current areas of study include: Emphysema, COPD, Asthma, Heart Failure, Heart Attack, Parkinsons Disease, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury, Lou Gehrigs Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Crohns Disease, Muscular Dystrophy, Inflammatory Myopathies, and Degenerative Orthopedic Joint Conditions (Knee, Shoulder, Hip, Spine). For more information, or if someone thinks they may be a candidate for one of the adult stem cell protocols offered by the Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center, they may contact Dr. Gionis directly at (949) 679-3889, or see a complete list of the Centers study areas at: http://www.IrvineStemCellsUSA.com.

Also, you can listen and call into our new radio show, The Stem Cell Show, hosted by Dr. Gionis on TalkRadio 790 AM KABC, Sundays @ 4pm PST, or worldwide on KABC.com (“Listen Live” at 4pm PST) or the KABC app available on the App Store or Google Play.

About the Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center: The Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center, along with sister affiliates, the Miami Stem Cell Treatment Center and the Manhattan Regenerative Medicine Medical Group, is an affiliate of the California Stem Cell Treatment Center / Cell Surgical Network (CSN); we are located in Irvine and Westlake, California. We provide care for people suffering from diseases that may be alleviated by access to adult stem cell based regenerative treatment. We utilize a fat transfer surgical technology to isolate and implant the patients own stem cells from a small quantity of fat harvested by a mini-liposuction on the same day. The investigational protocols utilized by the Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center have been reviewed and approved by an IRB (Institutional Review Board) which is registered with the U.S. Department of Health, Office of Human Research Protection (OHRP); and our studies are registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). For more information, visit our websites: http://www.IrvineStemCellsUSA.com, http://www.MiamiStemCellsUSA.com, or http://www.NYStemCellsUSA.com; http://www.TheStemCellShow.com.

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The Irvine Stem Cell Treatment Center Announces Adult Stem Cell Public Seminars in Costa Mesa and Sherman Oaks …

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Stem Cell Grants for Spina Bifida and Diabetic Wound Treatments

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) – The state stem cell agency, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM),awarded a pair of grants totaling more than $7 million to UC Davis School of Medicine researchers who are working to develop stem cell therapies for spina bifida and chronic diabetic wounds. The funding is part of what the agency considers “the most promising” research leading up to human clinical trials using stem cells to treat disease and injury. Diana Farmer, professor and chair of surgery at UC Davis Medical Center, is developing a placental stem cell therapy for spina bifida, the common and devastating birth defect that causes lifelong paralysis as well as bladder and bowel incontinence. She and her team are working on a unique treatment that can be applied in utero – before a baby is born — in order to reverse spinal cord damage. Roslyn Rivkah Isseroff, a UC Davis professor of dermatology, and Jan Nolta, professor of internal medicine and director of the university’s Stem Cell Program, are developing a wound dressing containing stem cells that could be applied to chronic wounds and be a catalyst for rapid healing. This is Isseroff’s second CIRM grant, and it will help move her research closer to having a product approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that specifically targets diabetic foot ulcers, a condition affecting more than 6 million people in the country. The CIRM board, which met in Berkeley today, has high hopes for these types of research that the agency funded in this latest round of stem cell grants. “This investment will let us further test the early promise shown by these projects,” said Jonathan Thomas, chair of CIRM’s governing board. “Preclinical work is vital in examining the feasibility, potential effectiveness and safety of a therapy before we try it on people. These projects all showed compelling evidence that they could be tremendously beneficial to patients. We want to help them build on that earlier research and move the projects to the next level.” The CIRM grants are designed to enable the UC Davis research teams to transition from preclinical research to preclinical development over the next 30 months to be able to meet the FDA’s rigorous safety and efficacy standards for Investigative New Drugs. As the former surgeon-in-chief at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Farmer helped pioneer fetal surgery techniques for treating spina bifida before birth. The condition, also known as myelomeningocele, is one of the most common and devastating birth defects worldwide, causing lifelong paralysis as well as bowel and bladder incontinence in newborns. Farmer has been investigating different stem cell types and the best way to deliver stem cell-based treatments in the womb for the past six years. She and her research colleagues recently discovered a placental therapy using stem cells that cures spina bifida in animal models. That discovery requires additional testing and FDA approval before the therapy can be used in humans. With the CIRM funding, Farmer and her team plan to optimize their stem cell product, validate its effectiveness, determine the optimal dose and confirm its preliminary safety in preparation for human clinical trials. Isseroff, who also serves as chief of dermatology and director of wound healing services for the VA Northern California Health Care System, has long been frustrated by the challenges of treating the chronic, non-healing wounds of diabetics. In 2010, she and Nolta received a CIRM grant to begin developing a bioengineered product for treating chronic diabetic wounds. Foot ulcers, in particular, affect about 25 percent of all diabetic patients and are responsible for most lower-limb amputations. Isseroff and her research team created a treatment using stem cells derived from bone marrow (mesenchymal stem cells) along with a FDA-approved scaffold to help regenerate dermal tissue and restart the healing process. Their studies found the technique to be highly effective for healing wounds in animal models. With this latest CIRM grant, Isseroff’s team will refine their therapeutic technique by determining the safest dosage for regenerating tissue and testing their product in skin-wound models that closely resemble those in diabetic humans. Nolta also plans to create a Master Cell Bank of pure and effective human mesenchymal stem cells, and establish standard operating procedures for use in diabetic wound repair. The results of their efforts will enable UC Davis to move closer to FDA approval for human clinical trials in the next two and a half years. “These amazing research efforts are giant steps forward in turning stem cells into cures,” said Nolta, who also directs the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures in Sacramento. “This preclinical research is the most crucial, and often the toughest, stage before we move scientific discoveries from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside. We are now poised as never before to make a big difference in the lives of people with spina bifida and non-healing diabetic wounds.” For more information, visit UC Davis School of Medicine at http://medschool.ucdavis.edu.

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Stem Cell Grants for Spina Bifida and Diabetic Wound Treatments

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Two different fat graft techniques have similar effects on facial skin

Two approaches to fat grafting — injection of fat cells versus fat-derived stem cells — have similar effects in reversing the cellular-level signs of aging skin, reports a study in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Since the facial rejuvenation results are the same, the simpler approach using fat cells plus the “stromal vascular fraction” has advantages over the more time-consuming stem cell fat technique. Dr. Gino Rigotti of Clinica San Francesco, Verona, Italy, directed a research team consisting of Luiz Charles-de-S and Natale Ferreira Gontijo-de-Amorim from Clinica Performa, Rio de Janeiro; and Andrea Sbarbati, Donatella Benati, and Paolo Bernardi from the Anatomy and Histology Institute, University of Verona.

Fat Grafts vs Stem Cells for Facial Rejuvenation

The experimental study compared the two approaches to fat grafting for regeneration of the facial skin. In these procedures, a small amount of the patient’s own fat is obtained by liposuction from another part of the body, such as the abdomen. After processing, the fat is grafted (transplanted) to the treated area, such as the face.

The study included six middle-aged patients who were candidates for facelift surgery. All underwent fat grafting to a small area in front of the ear.

One group of patients received fat-derived stem cells. Isolated and grown from the patients’ fat, these specialized cells have the potential to develop into several different types of tissue. The other group underwent injection of fat cells along with the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) — a rich mix of cell types, including stem cells.

Before and three months after fat grafting, samples of skin from the treated area were obtained for in-depth examination, including electron microscopy for ultrastructural-level detail.

After injection of fat cells plus SVF, the skin samples showed reduced degeneration of the skin’s elastic fiber network, or “elastosis” — a key characteristic of aging skin. These findings were confirmed by ultrastructural examination, which demonstrated the reabsorption of the elastosis and the development of relatively “young” elastic fibers.

In patients undergoing stem cell injection, the skin changes were essentially identical. “This result seems to suggest that the effect of a fat graft is, at least in part, due to its stem cell component,” Dr. Rigotti and coauthors write.

The researchers also found “suggestive” evidence that the rejuvenating effects of fat grafting are related to new formation of microscopic blood vessels. Further studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis, however. Dr. Rigotti comments, “In any case, this is the first study presenting clinical evidence showing skin rejuvenation after fat grafting and highlighting the anatomical and structural changes that are the basis of this rejuvenation.”

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Two different fat graft techniques have similar effects on facial skin

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Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two approaches to fat grafting–injection of fat cells versus fat-derived stem cells–have similar effects in reversing the cellular-level signs of aging skin, reports a study in the April issue of , the official medical journal of the

Since the facial rejuvenation results are the same, the simpler approach using fat cells plus the “stromal vascular fraction” has advantages over the more time-consuming stem cell fat technique. Dr. Gino Rigotti of Clinica San Francesco, Verona, Italy, directed a research team consisting of Luiz Charles-de-S and Natale Ferreira Gontijo-de-Amorim from Clinica Performa, Rio de Janeiro; and Andrea Sbarbati, Donatella Benati, and Paolo Bernardi from the Anatomy and Histology Institute, University of Verona.

Fat Grafts vs Stem Cells for Facial Rejuvenation

The experimental study compared the two approaches to fat grafting for regeneration of the facial skin. In these procedures, a small amount of the patient’s own fat is obtained by liposuction from another part of the body, such as the abdomen. After processing, the fat is grafted (transplanted) to the treated area, such as the face.

The study included six middle-aged patients who were candidates for

One group of patients received fat-derived stem cells. Isolated and grown from the patients’ fat, these specialized cells have the potential to develop into several different types of tissue. The other group underwent injection of fat cells along with the stromal vascular fraction (SVF)–a rich mix of cell types, including stem cells.

Before and three months after fat grafting, samples of skin from the treated area were obtained for in-depth examination, including electron microscopy for ultrastructural-level detail.

After injection of fat cells plus SVF, the skin samples showed reduced degeneration of the skin’s elastic fiber network, or “elastosis”–a key characteristic of aging skin. These findings were confirmed by ultrastructural examination, which demonstrated the reabsorption of the elastosis and the development of relatively “young” elastic fibers.

In patients undergoing stem cell injection, the skin changes were essentially identical. “This result seems to suggest that the effect of a fat graft is, at least in part, due to its stem cell component,” Dr Rigotti and coauthors write.

The researchers also found “suggestive” evidence that the rejuvenating effects of fat grafting are related to new formation of microscopic blood vessels. Further studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis, however. Dr. Rigotti comments, “In any case, this is the first study presenting clinical evidence showing skin rejuvenation after fat grafting and highlighting the anatomical and structural changes that are the basis of this rejuvenation.”

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Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

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Using patients' own cells to accelerate research into neurological disease

$1 M gift from Mr. J. Sebastian van Berkom launches translational research into neurological disease

This news release is available in French.

A patient’s very own skin cells may hold the key to new treatments and even cures for devastating neurological diseases. A generous $1 million donation from Mr. J. Sebastian van Berkom, and critical partnerships with Brain Canada, Laval University, Marigold Foundation and the FRQS-Rseau Parkinson Quebec are driving an innovative, iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cell) research platform that will transform research into Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases.

Millions of Canadians are affected by diseases of the brain such as ALS, Parkinson’s and brain tumours, for which there are limited treatments and no cures. By 2020, neurological conditions will become the leading cause of death and disability. “Everyone’s lives are touched in some way by neurological disease, says Mr. van Berkom, President of Van Berkom and Associates Inc.” In creating The van Berkom Parkinson’s Disease Open-Access Fund, I hope to change lives and support new research that will lead to new treatments and one day cures. The iPSC platform is a new paradigm for neuroscience research and as one of the world’s great neuroscience centres, The Neuro is the place to drive it forward.”

“This is the ultimate bench to bedside paradigm, from patient to the bench, back to the patient,” says Dr. Guy Rouleau, Director of The Neuro. “With a unique interface between fundamental and clinical research, The Neuro is uniquely positioned to be a central hub in the iPSC platform. Partnering with Mr. Van Berkom, a generous and visionary philanthropist, propels The Neuro toward the goal of significantly deepening insight into disease mechanisms with unprecedented efficiency.”

Patients’ skin cells will be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at Laval University, under the leadership of Dr Jack Puymirat, and then differentiated at The Neuro into disease relevant cells for research. For example, in the case of Parkinson’s this could be dopamine neurons. The cells can also be genome-edited, a state-of-the-art technique that can introduce or correct disease associated mutations – creating the most accurate disease models. These iPSCs will be made widely and openly available to researchers across Quebec for neuroscience research. This open-access approach exponentially increases the likelihood of breakthroughs in neurological disease.

“The unique and exciting aspect of this platform is that we are creating the most specific cells for studying disease using the patient’s own tissue, which has distinct advantages over using generic cells or animal models,” says Dr. Edward Fon, neurologist and co-Director of the Quebec iPSC platform. “Disease models using human samples are increasingly shown to be far more efficacious in trials, as they much more accurately mimic the disease condition. In the iPSC platform, not only can specific mutations be introduced but, cells are from patients’ whose specific clinical history and genetic profile are known, a first step on the road toward neurological personalized medicine. The Neuro has access to a large and well-characterized patient population, who can help create a rich clinically-and genetically-derived registry and biobank. The initial targets in the platform will be ALS and Parkinson’s disease (PD), using dopamine neurons for PD and both motor neurons and astrocytes for ALS.”

The Quebec iPSC core facility is a provincial core headed by Drs. Fon and Puymirat. Reprogrammed cells at Laval University will be created from different sources such as skin biopsies, blood or urine. The Neuro’s component of the platform will consist of two core facilities. The iPSC neuronal differentiation core – which differentiate iPSCs into functional neurons, headed by Dr. Eric Shoubridge, and the iPSC genome-editing core providing unprecedented ability to study the influence of disease mutations, headed by Dr. Peter McPherson.

###

The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital

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Using patients' own cells to accelerate research into neurological disease

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Patient's own skin cells may hold key to new treatments for neurological diseases

Published on March 31, 2015 at 1:52 PM

A patient’s very own skin cells may hold the key to new treatments and even cures for devastating neurological diseases. A generous $1 million donation from Mr. J. Sebastian van Berkom, and critical partnerships with Brain Canada, Laval University, Marigold Foundation and the FRQS-Rseau Parkinson Quebec are driving an innovative, iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cell) research platform that will transform research into Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases.

Millions of Canadians are affected by diseases of the brain such as ALS, Parkinson’s and brain tumours, for which there are limited treatments and no cures. By 2020, neurological conditions will become the leading cause of death and disability. “Everyone’s lives are touched in some way by neurological disease, says Mr. van Berkom, President of Van Berkom and Associates Inc.” In creating The van Berkom Parkinson’s Disease Open-Access Fund, I hope to change lives and support new research that will lead to new treatments and one day cures. The iPSC platform is a new paradigm for neuroscience research and as one of the world’s great neuroscience centres, The Neuro is the place to drive it forward.”

“This is the ultimate bench to bedside paradigm, from patient to the bench, back to the patient,” says Dr. Guy Rouleau, Director of The Neuro. “With a unique interface between fundamental and clinical research, The Neuro is uniquely positioned to be a central hub in the iPSC platform. Partnering with Mr. Van Berkom, a generous and visionary philanthropist, propels The Neuro toward the goal of significantly deepening insight into disease mechanisms with unprecedented efficiency.”

Patients’ skin cells will be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at Laval University, under the leadership of Dr Jack Puymirat, and then differentiated at The Neuro into disease relevant cells for research. For example, in the case of Parkinson’s this could be dopamine neurons. The cells can also be genome-edited, a state-of-the-art technique that can introduce or correct disease associated mutations – creating the most accurate disease models. These iPSCs will be made widely and openly available to researchers across Quebec for neuroscience research. This open-access approach exponentially increases the likelihood of breakthroughs in neurological disease.

“The unique and exciting aspect of this platform is that we are creating the most specific cells for studying disease using the patient’s own tissue, which has distinct advantages over using generic cells or animal models,” says Dr. Edward Fon, neurologist and co-Director of the Quebec iPSC platform. “Disease models using human samples are increasingly shown to be far more efficacious in trials, as they much more accurately mimic the disease condition. In the iPSC platform, not only can specific mutations be introduced but, cells are from patients’ whose specific clinical history and genetic profile are known, a first step on the road toward neurological personalized medicine. The Neuro has access to a large and well-characterized patient population, who can help create a rich clinically-and genetically-derived registry and biobank. The initial targets in the platform will be ALS and Parkinson’s disease (PD), using dopamine neurons for PD and both motor neurons and astrocytes for ALS.”

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Posted in: Medical Science News | Medical Research News | Medical Condition News

Tags: Blood, Brain, Cell, Disability, Dopamine, Epilepsy, Genetic, Hospital, Multiple Sclerosis, Neurological Disease, Neuroscience, Parkinson’s Disease, Personalized Medicine, Sclerosis, Stem Cell

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Patient's own skin cells may hold key to new treatments for neurological diseases

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Trial Shows Stem Cells Provide Long-Term Relief from Dangerous Crohns Side Effect

Durham, NC (PRWEB) March 31, 2015

Stem cells may provide Crohns disease sufferers relief from a common, potentially dangerous side effect fistulas according to the results of a phase 2 clinical trial published in the latest issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM). After receiving an injection of their own adipose-derived stem cells (ASC), which are collected from fat tissue, the fistulas in 75 percent of the trial participants were completely healed within eight weeks of their last treatment and remained so two years later.

Crohn’s disease is a painful, chronic autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract. Inflammation in Crohns patients can sometimes extend completely through the intestinal wall and create a fistula an abnormal connection between the intestine and another organ or skin. Left untreated, a fistula might become infected and form an abscess, which in some cases can be life threatening.

Chang Sik Yu, M.D., Ph.D., of Asan Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, a senior author of the SCTM paper, describes the results of a clinical trial conducted in collaboration with four other hospitals in South Korea, stated, Crohns fistula is one of the most distressing diseases as it decreases patients quality of life and frequently recurs. It has been reported to occur in up to 38 percent of Crohns patients and over the course of the disease, 10 to 18 percent of them must undergo a proctectomy, which is a surgical procedure to remove the rectum.

Overall, the treatments currently available for Crohns fistula remain unsatisfactory because they fail to achieve complete closure, lower recurrence and limit adverse effects, Dr. Yu said. Given the challenges and unmet medical needs in Crohns fistula, attention has turned to stem cell therapy as a possible treatment.

Several studies, including those undertaken by Dr. Yus team, suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) do indeed improve Crohns disease and Crohns fistula. Their phase II trial involved 43 patients for a term of one year, over the period from January 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that 82 percent experienced complete closure of fistula eight weeks after the final ASC injection.

It strongly demonstrated MSCs derived from ASCs are a safe and useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of Crohns fistula, Dr. Yu said.

The latest study was intended to evaluate the long-term outcome by following 41 of the original 43 patients for yet another year. Dr. Yu reported, Our long-term follow-up found that one or two doses of autologous ASC therapy achieved complete closure of the fistulas in 75 percent of the patients at 24 months, and sustainable safety and efficacy of initial response in 83 percent. No adverse events related to ASC administration were observed. Furthermore, complete closure after initial treatment was well sustained.

These results strongly suggest that autologous ASCs may be a novel treatment option for Crohns fistulae, he said.

Stem cells derived from fat tissue are known to regulate the immune response, which may explain these successful long-term results treating Crohns fistulae with a high risk of recurrence, said Anthony Atala, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

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MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful new tool for editing the genome. For researchers around the world, the CRISPR-Cas9 technique is an exciting innovation because it is faster and cheaper than previous methods. Now, using a molecular trick, Dr. Van Trung Chu and Professor Klaus Rajewsky of the Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch and Dr. Ralf Khn, MDC and Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), have found a solution to considerably increase the efficiency of precise genetic modifications by up to eightfold (Nature Biotechnology: doi:10.1038/nbt.3198).

“What we used to do in years, we can now achieve in months,” said gene researcher and immunologist Klaus Rajewsky, indicating the power of this new genome-editing technology. CRISPR-Cas9 not only speeds up research considerably – at the same time it is much more efficient, cheaper and also easier to handle than the methods used so far.

The CRISPR-Cas9 technology allows researchers to transiently introduce DNA double-strand breaks into the genome of cells or model organisms at genes of choice. In these artificially produced strand breaks, they can insert or cut out genes and change the genetic coding according to their needs.

Mammalian cells are able to repair DNA damage in their cells using two different repair mechanisms. The homology-directed repair (HDR) pathway enables the insertion of preplanned genetic modifications using engineered DNA molecules that share identical sequence regions with the targeted gene and which are recognized as a repair template. Thus, HDR repair is very precise but occurs only at low frequency in mammalian cells.

The other repair system, called non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is more efficient in nature but less precise, since it readily reconnects free DNA ends without repair template, thereby frequently deleting short sequences from the genome. Therefore, NHEJ repair can only be used to create short genomic deletions, but does not support precise gene modification or the insertion and replacement of gene segments.

Many researchers, including Van Trung Chu, Klaus Rajewsky and Ralf Khn, are seeking to promote the HDR repair pathway to make gene modification in the laboratory more precise in order to avoid editing errors and to increase efficiency. The MDC researchers succeeded in increasing the efficiency of the more precisely working HDR repair system by temporarily inhibiting the most dominant repair protein of NHEJ, the enzyme DNA Ligase IV. In their approach they used various inhibitors such as proteins and small molecules.

“But we also used a trick of nature and blocked Ligase IV with the proteins of adeno viruses. Thus we were able to increase the efficiency of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology up to eightfold,” Ralf Khn explained. For example, they succeeded in inserting a gene into a predefined position in the genome (knock-in) in more than 60 per cent of all manipulated mouse cells. Khn has just recently joined the MDC and is head of the research group for “iPS cell based disease modeling”. Before coming to the MDC, he was on the research staff of Helmholtz Zentrum Mnchen. “The expertise of Ralf Khn is very important for gene research at MDC and especially for my research group,” Klaus Rajewsky said.

Concurrent with the publication of the article by the MDC researchers, Nature Biotechnology published another, related paper on CRISPR-Cas9 technology. It comes from the laboratory of Hidde Ploegh of the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, MA, USA.

Somatic gene therapy with CRISPR-Cas9 is a goal

The new CRISPR-Cas9 technology, developed in 2012, is already used in the laboratory to correct genetic defects in mice. Researchers also plan to modify the genetic set up of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), which can be differentiated into specialized cell types or tissues. That is, researchers are able to use the new tool to introduce patient-derived mutations into the genome of iPS cells for studying the onset of human diseases. “Another future goal, however, is to use CRISPR-Cas9 for somatic gene therapy in humans with severe diseases,” Klaus Rajewsky pointed out.

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Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Neurological Diseases and Conditions – Video



Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Neurological Diseases and Conditions
Dr. Todd Malan, MD and Chief Cell Therapy Officer explains the benefits of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders and conditions including damaged brain tissue, spinal cord injuries…

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Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants – National Cancer …

What are bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells?

Bone marrow is the soft, sponge-like material found inside bones. It contains immature cells known as hematopoietic or blood-forming stem cells. (Hematopoietic stem cells are different from embryonic stem cells. Embryonic stem cells can develop into every type of cell in the body.) Hematopoietic stem cells divide to form more blood-forming stem cells, or they mature into one of three types of blood cells: white blood cells, which fight infection; red blood cells, which carry oxygen; and platelets, which help the blood to clot. Most hematopoietic stem cells are found in the bone marrow, but some cells, called peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs), are found in the bloodstream. Blood in the umbilical cord also contains hematopoietic stem cells. Cells from any of these sources can be used in transplants.

What are bone marrow transplantation and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation?

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are procedures that restore stem cells that have been destroyed by high doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. There are three types of transplants:

Why are BMT and PBSCT used in cancer treatment?

One reason BMT and PBSCT are used in cancer treatment is to make it possible for patients to receive very high doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. To understand more about why BMT and PBSCT are used, it is helpful to understand how chemotherapy and radiation therapy work.

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy generally affect cells that divide rapidly. They are used to treat cancer because cancer cells divide more often than most healthy cells. However, because bone marrow cells also divide frequently, high-dose treatments can severely damage or destroy the patients bone marrow. Without healthy bone marrow, the patient is no longer able to make the blood cells needed to carry oxygen, fight infection, and prevent bleeding. BMT and PBSCT replace stem cells destroyed by treatment. The healthy, transplanted stem cells can restore the bone marrows ability to produce the blood cells the patient needs.

In some types of leukemia, the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect that occurs after allogeneic BMT and PBSCT is crucial to the effectiveness of the treatment. GVT occurs when white blood cells from the donor (the graft) identify the cancer cells that remain in the patients body after the chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy (the tumor) as foreign and attack them. (A potential complication of allogeneic transplants called graft-versus-host disease is discussed in Questions 5 and 14.)

What types of cancer are treated with BMT and PBSCT?

BMT and PBSCT are most commonly used in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. They are most effective when the leukemia or lymphoma is in remission (the signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared). BMT and PBSCT are also used to treat other cancers such as neuroblastoma (cancer that arises in immature nerve cells and affects mostly infants and children) and multiple myeloma. Researchers are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment of various types of cancer.

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International Stem Cell Corporation Announces 2014 Fourth Quarter and Year-End Results

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Cytonet Enrolls Patients into Ongoing U.S. Clinical Trial Evaluating Liver Cell Therapy for Severe Urea Cycle …

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The CNIO identifies a new gene involved in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

IMAGE:Mutations (*) in several Krebs cycle genes (IDH1/2, SDH, FH and now MDH2) lead to the accumulation of metabolites (2-HG, SUC and FUM), which cause important changes in gene expression… view more

Credit: CNIO

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) — led by Alberto Cascn and Mercedes Robledo — have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. This research has been published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare diseases, with an incidence of 3 to 8 cases per million inhabitants. In spite of this low incidence, they represent a paradigm in hereditary cancer because they are the tumours with the highest hereditary predisposition: approximately 50% of the patients inherit and/or transmit the susceptibility to developing this cancer.

To date, researchers had identified 11 main genes whose mutations are responsible for pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. Of these, 6 are involved in cellular metabolism and more specifically, the Krebs cycle, which is the machinery used by cells to burn oxygen and obtain the energy required for cellular work.

CELLULAR METABOLISM AND CANCER

The researchers sequenced the whole exome — the part of the genome that produces the proteins — of one of the tumours in a patient with multiple malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas; this tumour showed no mutations in any of the 11 genes associated with genetic susceptibility to developing the disease.

Analysis and filtering of the almost 80,000 variants found in the sample allowed the identification of a mutation in the MDH2 gene, whose association with this type of cancer had not been described before. Moreover, “the presence of the mutation in first-degree relatives, one of whom was subsequently diagnosed with the disease, confirmed the hereditary nature of this genetic alteration,” explains Cascn.

The new discovery confirms the relationship between metabolism and the development of this type of tumour. Mutations in the Krebs cycle genes in patients with these tumours cause a metabolic alteration that leads to the accumulation of specific metabolites. These metabolites, known as oncometabolites, give rise to epigenetic changes in the genome that cause global gene expression changes and, as a consequence, the appearance of tumours.

IMPROVED GENETIC DIAGNOSIS

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UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis.

Javed, a professor in the UAB School of Dentistry’s Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, says the results will contribute to future personalized medicine. This month, Javed presented this work to a standing-room-only audience at the International Association for Dental Research Annual Meeting in Boston. The work was published recently in two articles in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

It was well-known that the deletion of both copies of the runx2 gene is lethal and the organism cannot form bone, teeth or cartilage.

To learn about the function of runx2 in specific cells types, Javed and his colleagues developed mice in which both copies of the runx2 gene were removed in only one of two key cells for bone tissue either chondrocytes or osteoblasts.

“Our objective was to dissect and tease out which cell is really contributing what in bone development,” Javed said. “Runx2 is vital. But when we talk up personalized medicine, we need to identify which specialized cells to target within bone tissue.”

Study of these mice (technically known as the next-generation conditional knockout runx2 model) shows that chondrocytes and osteoblasts have surprisingly different functions in bone formation during gestation or after birth:

Chondrocytes are involved in bone mineralization during embryonic development. Osteoblasts are involved in bone growth during postnatal development. This is a major step forward in understanding the biology of bones the dynamic, complex organs that are actively remodeled throughout life. Bones have cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), bone-creating cells (osteoblasts), bone-eating cells (osteoclasts), neuronal cells and blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells. Connective tissue and muscle surround the bones.

Chondrocytes Javed’s model began with the cartilage-producing cells. “We first removed the runx2 gene in chondrocytes, cells that are fundamental for every cartilage tissue in the body,” Javed said. “Our first surprise was lethality at birth.”

The skull of the mouse neonates was normal (skull bones are formed through a different bone-creation process); but the cartilage of all the other bones in the body failed to mature and get replaced by mineralized bone, a process known as endochondral ossification. So runx2, which had previously been thought to function only in the developing terminally mature chondrocyte, now appears to act earlier.

Without the runx2 gene, chondrocytes are unable to proliferate and differentiate into the column of cells needed for bone formation and lengthening. The deletion mutant showed that runx2 directly regulates a unique set of four cell-cycle genes to control the proliferative capacity of chondrocytes. The runx2 mutant mice also suffered dwarfism due to a near absence of a proliferative zone in the growth plates of bones.

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Illuminati Science EXPOSED Genetic Engineering, Cloning, DNA Manipulation, Transhumanism 1080p – Video



Illuminati Science EXPOSED Genetic Engineering, Cloning, DNA Manipulation, Transhumanism 1080p
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What is Genetic Engineering? – by Wideo.co – Video



What is Genetic Engineering? – by Wideo.co
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Seeds of Death: Unveiling the Lies of GMOs (Full Length) HD – Video



Seeds of Death: Unveiling the Lies of GMOs (Full Length) HD
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What is Genetic Engineering? – Video



What is Genetic Engineering?
Learn about how genetic engineering works and how it can be applied in science.

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Genetic Engineering Video 678 – Video



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Can caffeine be used to treat or prevent Alzheimer's disease?

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Credit: (c) 2015 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

New Rochelle, NY, March 31, 2015-The proposed link between caffeine and reductions in the beta amyloid plaque accumulation characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) suggest a possible role for caffeine in AD treatment. The latest evidence linking beta amyloid protein to Alzheimer’s disease and exploring the relationship between caffeine and beta amyloid are featured in a review article in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Caffeine Research website at http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jcr.2014.0027 until May 1, 2015.

In the article “Caffeine as Treatment for Alzheimer’s: A Review”, Abhishek Mohan, BS, Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA), and coauthors identify the potential opportunities for using caffeine to reduce beta amyloid levels as a means of preventing, treating, and slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

“To say that strategizing medicines to treat Alzheimer’s disorders is important is an understatement,” says Patricia A. Broderick, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Caffeine Research, Medical Professor in Physiology, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, The Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, The City College of New York, The City University of New York, and Adjunct Professor in Neurology, New York University Langone Medical Center and Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. “Moreover, to say that caffeine is just an ordinary staple in our lives, whether caffeine is part of coffee or a chocolate bar, is also an understatement. Thus, what Dr. Mohan has published herein is elegant in its simplicity; his work is critically on target.”

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About the Journal

Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science is a quarterly journal published online with Open Access options and in print. The Journal covers the effects of caffeine on a wide range of diseases and conditions, including mood disorders, neurological disorders, cognitive performance, cardiovascular disease, and sports performance. Journal of Caffeine Research explores all aspects of caffeine science including the biochemistry of caffeine; its actions on the human body; benefits, dangers, and contraindications; and caffeine addiction and withdrawal, across all stages of the human life span from prenatal exposure to end-of-life. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Caffeine Research website at http://www.liebertpub.com/jcr.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Breastfeeding Medicine, Journal of Medicinal Food, and Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website at http://www.liebertpub.com.

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Can caffeine be used to treat or prevent Alzheimer's disease?

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What is the best measure of depression severity in adolescents?

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New Rochelle, NY, March 30, 2015–At present the key symptom for diagnosing major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents is irritability. However a new study has found that the severity of anhedonia (the inability to gain pleasure from experiences that usually are enjoyable) rather than of irritability is associated with more severe MDD and worse clinical outcomes and suicide scores. Results of the study are published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology (JCAP), a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, and is available free on the JCAP website until April 30, 2015.

Vilma Gabbay, MD, and coauthors at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and New York University Langone Medical Center (New York, NY), and Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research (Orangeburg, NY), used a quantitative approach to focus on symptoms of irritability and anhedonia simultaneously in 90 adolescents with MDD. Only anhedonia severity showed a significant correlation with the severity of overall outcomes, including illness severity, episode duration, and number of MDD episodes. In the article “Anhedonia, but not Irritability Is Associated with Illness Severity Outcomes in Adolescent Major Depression,” the authors emphasize the importance of closely monitoring highly anhedonic depressed adolescents.

“This is a pivotal study of the critical aspects of adolescent depression,” says Harold S. Koplewicz, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology and President of the Child Mind Institute in New York. “The authors provide us with an insight that has significant implications for early intervention and effective treatment. Their work also reinforces the need for targeted studies of this disease in the adolescent population if we want to understand it and mitigate its harmful effects on youth.”

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About the Journal

Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology (JCAP), celebrating 25 years in 2015, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published 10 times a year in print and online. The Journal is dedicated to child and adolescent psychiatry and behavioral pediatrics, covering clinical and biological aspects of child and adolescent psychopharmacology and developmental neurobiology. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the JCAP website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Games for Health Journal, and Violence and Gender. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

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What is the best measure of depression severity in adolescents?

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