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Prothena's NEOD001 Demonstrates Encouraging Cardiac Biomarker Responses in Ongoing Phase 1 Study in Patients With …

NEOD001 appears generally safe, well-tolerated, has acceptable pharmacokinetic properties and no immunogenicity at studied dose levels No dose limiting toxicities have been observed Eight of nine evaluable …

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Prothena's NEOD001 Demonstrates Encouraging Cardiac Biomarker Responses in Ongoing Phase 1 Study in Patients With …

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Wounded Warrior severe low back pain 3 months after stem cells by Dr Harry Adelson – Video



Wounded Warrior severe low back pain 3 months after stem cells by Dr Harry Adelson
Seven years ago while serving in Special Forces in Afghanistan, Ben was hit directly in the chest by a Rocket-Propelled-Grenade which slammed him against a wall and crushed his spine. THEN…

By: Harry Adelson, N.D.

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Wounded Warrior severe low back pain 3 months after stem cells by Dr Harry Adelson – Video

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Stem cells in circulating blood affect cardiovascular health, study finds

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

23-Apr-2014

Contact: Nicanor Moldovan Moldovan.6@osu.edu 614-247-7801 Ohio State University

COLUMBUS, Ohio New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health a task considered possible but very difficult might not be necessary.

Instead, scientists have found that multiple types of cells with primitive characteristics circulating in the blood appear to provide the same benefits expected from a stem cell, including the endothelial progenitor cell that is the subject of hot pursuit.

“There are people who still dream that the prototypical progenitors for several components of the cardiovascular tree will be found and isolated. I decided to focus the analysis on the whole nonpurified cell population the blood as it is,” said Nicanor Moldovan, senior author of the study and a research associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at The Ohio State University.

“Our method determines the contributions of all blood cells that serve the same function that an endothelial progenitor cell is supposed to. We can detect the presence of those cells and their signatures in a clinical sample without the need to isolate them.”

The study is published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Stem cells, including the still poorly understood endothelial progenitor cells, are sought-after because they have the potential to transform into many kinds of cells, suggesting that they could be used to replace damaged or missing cells as a treatment for multiple diseases.

By looking at gene activity patterns in blood, Moldovan and colleagues concluded that many cell types circulating throughout the body may protect and repair blood vessels a key to keeping the heart healthy.

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Stem cells in circulating blood affect cardiovascular health, study finds

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Stem Cells in Circulating Blood Affect Cardiovascular Health

Released: 4/21/2014 8:55 AM EDT Embargo expired: 4/23/2014 5:00 PM EDT Source Newsroom: Ohio State University Contact Information

Available for logged-in reporters only

Newswise COLUMBUS, Ohio New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health a task considered possible but very difficult might not be necessary.

Instead, scientists have found that multiple types of cells with primitive characteristics circulating in the blood appear to provide the same benefits expected from a stem cell, including the endothelial progenitor cell that is the subject of hot pursuit.

There are people who still dream that the prototypical progenitors for several components of the cardiovascular tree will be found and isolated. I decided to focus the analysis on the whole nonpurified cell population the blood as it is, said Nicanor Moldovan, senior author of the study and a research associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at The Ohio State University.

Our method determines the contributions of all blood cells that serve the same function that an endothelial progenitor cell is supposed to. We can detect the presence of those cells and their signatures in a clinical sample without the need to isolate them.

The study is published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Stem cells, including the still poorly understood endothelial progenitor cells, are sought-after because they have the potential to transform into many kinds of cells, suggesting that they could be used to replace damaged or missing cells as a treatment for multiple diseases.

By looking at gene activity patterns in blood, Moldovan and colleagues concluded that many cell types circulating throughout the body may protect and repair blood vessels a key to keeping the heart healthy.

The scientists also found that several types of blood cells retain so-called primitive properties. In this context, primitive is positive because these cells are the first line of defense against an injury and provide a continuous supply of repair tissue either directly or by telling local cells what to do.

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Stem Cells in Circulating Blood Affect Cardiovascular Health

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Other Views: Benefits of cloning stem cells

Benefits of cloning stem cells Controversies over stem-cell research are so last decade – or so it seemed until last week.

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Other Views: Benefits of cloning stem cells

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Hall Rejuvenation – Video



Hall Rejuvenation
Male Rejuvenation: Fountain of Youth or Dangerous Hype? The world's first Cyber Journal Club! Join faculty and fellows in reproductive medicine and male in. . GYN…

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More Media Coverage for MediVet Stem Cell Therapy at Newman Veterinary Centers – Central Florida – Video



More Media Coverage for MediVet Stem Cell Therapy at Newman Veterinary Centers – Central Florida
We are proud to offer this amazing procedure at Newman Veterinary Centers. Stem cell therapy can help pets with arthritis, hip dysplasia and many other degenerative conditions. Learn more at…

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More Media Coverage for MediVet Stem Cell Therapy at Newman Veterinary Centers – Central Florida – Video

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Stem Cells and Multiple Sclerosis – Video



Stem Cells and Multiple Sclerosis
Dr Colin Andrews speaks about the optimistic results of treating MS (multiple sclerosis) with stem cell therapy and the ethical limitations within Australia.

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Stem Cells and Multiple Sclerosis – Video

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Neck/knee/shoulder/wrist pain 7 months after stem cell therapy by Dr Harry Adelson – Video



Neck/knee/shoulder/wrist pain 7 months after stem cell therapy by Dr Harry Adelson

By: Harry Adelson, N.D.

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Neck/knee/shoulder/wrist pain 7 months after stem cell therapy by Dr Harry Adelson – Video

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Stem Cell Therapy Market Worth $330 Million in 2020

DALLAS, April 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — According to the new research report "Stem Cell Therapy Marketby Treatment Mode (Autologous & Allogeneic), Therapeutic Applications (CNS, CVS, GIT, Wound …

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Stem Cell Therapy Market Worth $330 Million in 2020

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Research and Markets: Cell Therapy Deals and Alliances of 2013

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Cell Therapy Deals and Alliances of 2013" report to their o

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Research and Markets: Cell Therapy Deals and Alliances of 2013

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Fresenius Kabi Introduces Lovo Cell Processing System

Fresenius Kabi, a global health care company that specializes in life-saving medicines and technologies for infusion, transfusion and clinical nutrition, today introduced its new L

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Fresenius Kabi Introduces Lovo Cell Processing System

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Cook Medical Introduces Stemulate Human Platelet Lysate Cell Culture Media Supplement

Cook Medical will introduce its Stemulate Pooled Human Platelet Lysate cell culture media supplement at the 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy meeting, April 23-26.

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Cook Medical Introduces Stemulate Human Platelet Lysate Cell Culture Media Supplement

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Aastrom Biosciences Acquires Sanofi Cell Therapy And Regenerative Medicine Business

By Estel Grace Masangkay

Aastrom Biosciences announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Sanofis Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine (CTRM) business for $6.5 million.

Sanofi will receive $4 million in cash at closing and $2.5 million in promissory. The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to be completed in about three weeks.

Nick Colangelo, president and CEO of Aastrom, said, The acquisition of Sanofi’s CTRM business is a transformative transaction that positions Aastrom as a fully-integrated global regenerative medicine company. The CTRM business brings us global manufacturing, marketing and sales capabilities that are structured to support the current portfolio of marketed products as well as our future product development plans. This transaction also provides us with a platform to generate operating income to support the development of our high-potential pipeline products and continued growth through additional strategic transactions.

Through its acquisition of CTRM, Aastrom acquires global rights to three marketed autologous cell therapy products. These are Carticel (autologous cultured chondrocytes), Epicel (cultured epidermal autografts), and MACI (matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implant). Carticel is approved and marketed in the U.S. for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. Epicel is a permanent skin replacement for burns with full thickness greater than or equal to 30 percent of total body surface area. Epicel is marketed worldwide. MACI is a third-generation autologous chondrocyte implant (ACI) product currently commercialized in the E.U.

Sanofi’s CTRM business, a pioneering organization with more than 20 years of experience in cell therapy and regenerative medicine, developed and marketed some of the first regenerative medicine products in the world. We look forward to working with the talented CTRM team to build Aastrom into the leading cell therapy company in the regenerative medicine field, Aastrom CEO Colangelo said.

Sanofi originally acquired its CTRM business through its acquisition of Genzyme Corp. in 2011.

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Aastrom Biosciences Acquires Sanofi Cell Therapy And Regenerative Medicine Business

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Autologous stem cell therapy improves motor function in chronic stroke victims

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

23-Apr-2014

Contact: Robert Miranda cogcomm@aol.com Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Putnam Valley, NY. (Apr. 23, 2014) People who have had a stroke, often suffer motor deficits with little potential to restore neurological function. However, a study conducted in Taiwan, that will be published in a future issue of Cell Transplantation, but is currently freely available on-line as an unedited early e-pub at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/pre-prints/content-ct1168Chen, has found that when one group of stroke victims had their own peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) injected directly into the brain and a similar group did not, those who received the PBSCs experienced some “improvement in stroke scales and functional outcome.” Those in the PBSC-injected group also received injections of the growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), known to be potentially neuroprotective.

“In this phase 2 study, we provide the first evidence that intracerebral injection of autologous (self-donated) PBSCs can improve motor function in those who have suffered a stroke and have motor deficits as a result,” said study corresponding Dr. Woei-Cheng Shyu of the Center for Neuropsychiatry, Graduate Institute of Immunology and Translational Medicine Research Center, China Medical University in Taiwan. “Our study demonstrated that this therapeutic strategy was feasible and safe in stroke patients who suffered a prior stroke, but within five years from the onset of symptoms.”

According to the authors, there has been little advance made in restoring neurological function following ischemic stroke. However, since neuronal death is the primary mechanism that limits functional recovery, stem cell therapy is emerging as a potentially effective regenerative approach. Once more PBSCs are being increasingly used as a self-donated source for cell therapies for regenerating skeletal muscle, heart and neurons. The PBSCs may need to be “amplified” with G-CSF, speculated the researchers.

All of the patients in the trial had suffered a stroke in the past, as long as five years prior to this study. At the end of a 12 month follow-up, the group of 15 patients with neurological deficits who received injections of PBSCs experienced neurological and functional improvement based on a number of clinical outcomes measures. The control group of 15 patients with neurological deficits that did not receive the PBSC injections did not experience the same beneficial outcomes.

The researchers reported that nine of the 15 patients undergoing PBSC transplantation experienced “positive motor evoked potentials” (MEPs) after transcranial magnetic stimulation, but why MEPs appeared in some of the transplanted group, but not all, was unclear.

“Despite this success, it should be noted that this was a preliminary study and, due to the small number of patients, are tentative,” concluded the researchers. “In the future we plan to conduct a multi-center, large-scale, double blind, placebo-controlled randomized studies to better evaluate the effect of PBSC implantation in patients suffering from the effects of past stroke.”

“This phase II study offers pilot clinical evidence supporting the use of autologous stem cell-based treatment for stroke” said Dr. Cesar V. Borlongan, Prof. of Neurosurgery and Director of the Center of Excellence for Aging & Brain Repair at the University of South Florida. “Clarification of the impact of G-CSF on the cells and whether other factors are necessary to maximize the benefit of cell transplantation, as well as further studies with a larger number of patients are necessary to determine equivocal safety and efficacy of this treatment”.

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Autologous stem cell therapy improves motor function in chronic stroke victims

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Bionic ear technology helps re-grow auditory nerves for first time ever

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Bionic ear technology helps re-grow auditory nerves for first time ever

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Hearing quality restored with bionic ear technology used for gene therapy: Re-growing auditory nerves

Researchers at UNSW Australia have for the first time used electrical pulses delivered from a cochlear implant to deliver gene therapy, thereby successfully regrowing auditory nerves.

The research also heralds a possible new way of treating a range of neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, and psychiatric conditions such as depression through this novel way of delivering gene therapy.

The research is published today (Thursday 24 April) in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

“People with cochlear implants do well with understanding speech, but their perception of pitch can be poor, so they often miss out on the joy of music,” says UNSW Professor Gary Housley, who is the senior author of the research paper.

“Ultimately, we hope that after further research, people who depend on cochlear implant devices will be able to enjoy a broader dynamic and tonal range of sound, which is particularly important for our sense of the auditory world around us and for music appreciation,” says Professor Housley, who is also the Director of the Translational Neuroscience Facility at UNSW Medicine.

The research, which has the support of Cochlear Limited through an Australian Research Council Linkage Project grant, has been five years in development.

The work centres on regenerating surviving nerves after age-related or environmental hearing loss, using existing cochlear technology. The cochlear implants are “surprisingly efficient” at localised gene therapy in the animal model, when a few electric pulses are administered during the implant procedure.

“This research breakthrough is important because while we have had very good outcomes with our cochlear implants so far, if we can get the nerves to grow close to the electrodes and improve the connections between them, then we’ll be able to have even better outcomes in the future,” says Jim Patrick, Chief Scientist and Senior Vice-President, Cochlear Limited.

It has long been established that the auditory nerve endings regenerate if neurotrophins — a naturally occurring family of proteins crucial for the development, function and survival of neurons — are delivered to the auditory portion of the inner ear, the cochlea.

But until now, research has stalled because safe, localised delivery of the neurotrophins can’t be achieved using drug delivery, nor by viral-based gene therapy.

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Hearing quality restored with bionic ear technology used for gene therapy: Re-growing auditory nerves

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Researchers add gene therapy to cochlear implants in deaf animals

WASHINGTON – Australian researchers are trying a novel way to boost the power of cochlear implants: They used the technology to beam gene therapy into the ears of deaf animals and found the combination improved hearing.

The approach reported Wednesday isn’t ready for human testing, but it’s part of growing research into ways to let users of cochlear implants experience richer, more normal sound.

Normally, microscopic hair cells in a part of the inner ear called the cochlea detect vibrations and convert them to electrical impulses that the brain recognizes as sound. Hearing loss typically occurs as those hair cells are lost, whether from aging, exposure to loud noises or other factors.

Cochlear implants substitute for the missing hair cells, sending electrical impulses to directly activate auditory nerves in the brain. They’ve been implanted in more than 300,000 people. While highly successful, they don’t restore hearing to normal, missing out on musical tone, for instance.

The idea behind the project: Perhaps a closer connection between the implant and the auditory nerves would improve hearing. Those nerves’ bush-like endings can regrow if exposed to nerve-nourishing proteins called neurotrophins. Usually, the hair cells would provide those.

Researchers at Australia’s University of New South Wales figured out a new way to deliver one of those growth factors.

They injected a growth factor-producing gene into the ears of deafened guinea pigs, animals commonly used as a model for human hearing. Then they adapted an electrode from a cochlear implant to beam in a few stronger-than-normal electrical pulses.

That made the membranes of nearby cells temporarily permeable, so the gene could slip inside. Those cells began producing the growth factor, which in turn stimulated regrowth of the nerve fibers closing some of the space between the nerves and the cochlear implant, the team reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The animals still needed a cochlear implant to detect sound but those given the gene therapy had twice the improvement, they concluded.

Senior author Gary Housley estimated small studies in people could begin in two or three years.

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Researchers add gene therapy to cochlear implants in deaf animals

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Scientists reverse memory loss in Alzheimer's-afflicted mice

MADRID, SPAIN – Spanish scientists have for the first time used gene therapy to reverse memory loss in mice with Alzheimer’s, an advance that could lead to new drugs to treat the disease, they said Wednesday.

The Autonomous University of Barcelona team injected a gene which causes the production of a protein that is blocked in patients with Alzheimer’s into the hippocampus — a region of the brian essential to memory processing — in mice that were in the initial stages of the disease.

“The protein that was reinstated by the gene therapy triggers the signals needed to activate the genes involved in long-term memory consolidation,” the university said in a statement.

Gene therapy involves transplanting genes into a patient’s cells to correct an otherwise incurable disease caused by a failure of one or another gene.

The finding was published in The Journal of Neuroscience and it follows four years of research.

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Scientists reverse memory loss in Alzheimer's-afflicted mice

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Parkinson's drug shows promise in preventing breast cancer

Women with mutations in the BRCA1 gene are at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, and there are currently no drugs proven to reduce their cancer risk.

Now, early research suggests that existing drugs, already approved to treat other conditions, may help prevent breast cancer in these women, although more research is needed to prove this.

One drug, called benserazide, is currently used for Parkinson’s disease, and in studies it reduced the formation of breast tumors in mice that had been implanted with cancer cells containing the BRCA1 gene mutation. All of the mice that did not receive the drug developed breast tumors, but 40 percent of mice given the drug were tumor-free, said study researcher Elizabeth Alli, of Stanford University School of Medicine. [7 Diseases You Can Learn About From a Genetic Test]

Some studies show that women with mutations in the BRCA1 gene have a 50 to 70 percent chance of getting breast cancer by age 70, compared with a 12 percent lifetime risk for the average American woman. Last year, actress Angelina Jolie announced she had undergone a double mastectomy to prevent breast cancer because she has a BRCA1 gene mutation.

Two drugs, tamoxifen and raloxifene, are already approved to prevent breast cancer, but there’s little information about how well they work for women with BRCA1 gene mutations. Both drugs work by blocking the action of estrogen on breast cells; the hormone can fuel the growth of certain types of breast cancer.

“The data out there for the efficacy of these drugs [among carries of BRCA1 mutations] is controversial, and inconsistent,” Alli said. “So really it’d be ideal to identify new drugs that are more effective for this population.”

The BRCA1 gene is involved in repairing damaged DNA a critical function, because damage to DNA can lead to cancer. Mutations in the BRCA1 gene increase the risk of cancer because they impair this repair process.

Benserazide, and possibly other drugs, may work to prevent breast cancer from BRCA1 mutations by restoring cells’ ability to perform one type of DNA repair, the researchers said.

Alli noted that tamoxifen also increases the risk of endometrial cancer (cancer of the uterus lining), and for some women, this risk may outweigh the drug’s benefits.

The next step in the research is to see whether benserazide, or other drugs that work similarly, prevents breast cancer in mice that have been genetically engineered to have BRCA1 gene mutations.

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Parkinson's drug shows promise in preventing breast cancer

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Researchers add gene therapy to cochlear implants in deaf animals, aiming to improve hearing

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Symbiosis and Genetic engineering clip from "Core Biology: Plant Sciences" – Video



Symbiosis and Genetic engineering clip from “Core Biology: Plant Sciences”
1886-Nitrogen-Fixing of the Pea Family is Explained from the video Core Biology: Plant Sciences For more information and to purchase, please visit: DVD http:…

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Symbiosis and Genetic engineering clip from "Core Biology: Plant Sciences" – Video

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Screening instrument to identify testosterone deficiency

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

23-Apr-2014

Contact: Vicki Cohn vcohn@liebertpub.com 914-740-2100 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

New Rochelle, NY, April 23, 2014Men whose testosterone falls below normal levels are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and to be overweight and have heart disease and type 2 diabetes. A new simple screening questionnaire designed to identify testosterone-deficient men for further testing and possible treatment is described in an article in Journal of Men’s Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Men’s Health website at http://www.liebertpub.com/jmh.

The article “Male Androgen Deficiency Syndrome (MADS) Screening Questionnaire: A Simplified Instrument to Identify Testosterone-Deficient Men” presents a variety of patient factors that are predictive of risk for testosterone deficiency and MADS. These include overweight status, race, exercise frequency, erectile dysfunction, and type 2 diabetes, according to study authors Nelson Stone, MD, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (New York), Martin Miner, MD, Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University (Providence, RI), Wendy Poage, MHA, Prostate Conditions Education Council (Centennial, CO), and Aditi Patel and E. David Crawford, MD, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (Aurora, CO).

###

About the Journal

Journal of Men’s Health is the premier peer-reviewed journal published quarterly in print and online that covers all aspects of men’s health across the lifespan. The Journal publishes cutting-edge advances in a wide range of diseases and conditions, including diagnostic procedures, therapeutic management strategies, and innovative clinical research in gender-based biology to ensure optimal patient care. The Journal addresses disparities in health and life expectancy between men and women; increased risk factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, and obesity; higher prevalence of diseases such as heart disease and cancer; and health care in underserved and minority populations. Journal of Men’s Health meets the critical imperative for improving the health of men around the globe and ensuring better patient outcomes. Tables of content and a sample issue can be viewed on the Journal of Men’s Health website at http://www.liebertpub.com/jmh.

About the Societies

Journal of Men’s Health is the official journal of the International Society of Men’s Health (ISMH), American Society for Men’s Health, Men’s Health Society of India, and Foundation for Men’s Health. The ISMH is an international, multidisciplinary, worldwide organization, dedicated to the rapidly growing field of gender-specific men’s health.

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Screening instrument to identify testosterone deficiency

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Genetic Tricks Could Make Bionic Ears Hear Better

A CT scan showing a cochlear implant in the left ear of a guinea pig. Image: UNSW Australia Biological Resources Imaging Laboratory, NationalImaging Facility of Australia, and UNSW TranslationalNeuroscience Facility

Scientists have devised a strategy they hope will one day make bionic ears even sharper. The idea is to make neurons inside the ear sprout new branches and become more sensitive to signals from a cochlear implant.

The cochlear implant is arguably the most successful bionic device ever invented. More than 200,000 people with severe hearing loss have received one, allowing them to understand speech and hear things like barking dogs and fire alarms. But theres plenty of room for improvement.

Pitch perception is not so good, and that impacts music appreciation and hearing in a complex environment like a noisy room, said Gary Housley, a physiologist and neuroscientist at the University of New South Wales in Australia, and the senior author of a new study out today in Science Translational Medicine.

To appreciate what Housleys team did, you have to picture whats going on inside the inner ear. The bony, spiral cochlea is where sound waves get translated into the electrical language of neurons. Its essentially a coiled tube. The implant is thin like a wire, and it has an array of electrodes along its length. Surgeons thread it into the tube of the cochlea.A microphone worn on the ear converts sound into electrical signals and transmits them to the implant, thereby stimulating the auditory nerve directly and bypassing whatever part of the persons own hearing apparatus has broken down.

A cross section of the spiral tube of the cochlea shows the auditory nerve reaching up through the center. Image: Grays Anatomy, via WikiCommons

But a lot of information gets lost in the communication between the implant and the nerve.

Housley thinks one important reason is that in people with severe hearing loss, auditory nerve fibers degenerate and shrink into the bony core of the cochlea, farther away from the implant.

To try to overcome this communication breakdown, Housleys team borrowed some tricks from genetic engineering. We refer to it as closing the neural gap, he said.

Work by other scientists had suggested that growth factorschemicals that encourage neurons to grow new branchescouldimprove the performance of implants in lab animals. These studies used viruses to deliver genes encoding the growth factors, but Housleys team tried another strategy they think could be more precise.

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Genetic Tricks Could Make Bionic Ears Hear Better

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How Genetics Determine Your Baby’s Gender – Video



How Genetics Determine Your Baby's Gender

By: Waiting for baby

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How Genetics Determine Your Baby’s Gender – Video

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