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"IN A MINUTE" – Cell Therapy – Video



“IN A MINUTE” – Cell Therapy

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Dr. Mya Schiess: Cell Therapy in Parkinson Degeneration – Video



Dr. Mya Schiess: Cell Therapy in Parkinson Degeneration
“Cell Therapy in Parkinson Degeneration” Mya Schiess, MD, Neurologist, University of Texas The 3rd Annual Parkinson's Conference July 19, 2014 Pennington Biomedical Research Center 6400 Perkins…

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Ebola Field Trial in Genetic Engineering Financed by Pentagon? – Video



Ebola Field Trial in Genetic Engineering Financed by Pentagon?
5 years after the fake with the swine flu: The World Health Organization WHO beats alarm: A fatal virus again threatens the world, this time it is called Ebo…

By: Michael Leitner

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Ebola Field Trial in Genetic Engineering Financed by Pentagon? – Video

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Lecture 10: Genetic Engineering – Video



Lecture 10: Genetic Engineering
I would like to welcome you to Lecture 10 of the subject Genetic Engineering. This subject is a component of the BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY offered at both NMIT Melbourne…

By: Nicky Cooley

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D420K and Jake stop by for a puff and some genetics – Video



D420K and Jake stop by for a puff and some genetics
Jake and D420K stop by and grab some genetics, D picks up his Apex pen gift bag from Bird, and dabs are taken!!!

By: Bubbleman's World

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D420K and Jake stop by for a puff and some genetics – Video

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FTB Monster w/ DC_MiLK S2E11 "Advanced Genetics More Hearts" – Video



FTB Monster w/ DC_MiLK S2E11 “Advanced Genetics More Hearts”
The lab is done and now its to to experiment on our new guest. This mod is GRINDY. ======================================== Don't forget to like, share, subscribe, and favorite. If you enjoyed this.

By: DC MiLK

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FTB Monster w/ DC_MiLK S2E11 "Advanced Genetics More Hearts" – Video

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Gene Therapy EDTECH – Video



Gene Therapy EDTECH

By: Krittamet Tatsanapornsatith

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Gene Therapy EDTECH – Video

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Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

Published on August 30, 2014 at 7:03 AM

The current method to treat acute toxin poisoning is to inject antibodies, commonly produced in animals, to neutralize the toxin. But this method has challenges ranging from safety to difficulties in developing, producing and maintaining the anti-serums in large quantities.

New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the August 29 issue of PLOS ONE.

Shoemaker has been studying gene therapy as a novel way to treat diseases such as botulism, a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Despite the relatively small number of botulism poisoning cases nationally, there are global concerns that the toxin can be produced easily and inexpensively for bioterrorism use. Botulism, like E. coli food poisoning and C. difficile infection, is a toxin-mediated disease, meaning it occurs from a toxin that is produced by a microbial infection.

Shoemaker’s previously reported antitoxin treatments use proteins produced from the genetic material extracted from alpacas that were immunized against a toxin. Alpacas, which are members of the camelid family, produce an unusual type of antibody that is particularly useful in developing effective, inexpensive antitoxin agents. A small piece of the camelid antibody – called a VHH – can bind to and neutralize the botulism toxin. The research team has found that linking two or more different toxin-neutralizing VHHs results in VHH-based neutralizing agents (VNAs) that have extraordinary antitoxin potency and can be produced as a single molecule in bacteria at low cost. Additionally, VNAs have a longer shelf life than traditional antibodies so they can be better stored until needed.

The newly published PLOS ONE study assessed the long-term efficacy of the therapy and demonstrated that a single gene therapy treatment led to prolonged production of VNA in blood and protected the mice from subsequent exposures to C. botulinum toxin for up to several months. Virtually all mice pretreated with VNA gene therapy survived when exposed to a normally lethal dose of botulinum toxin administered up to nine weeks later. Approximately 40 percent survived when exposed to this toxin as late as 13 or 17 weeks post-treatment. With gene therapy the VNA genetic material is delivered to animals by a vector that induces the animals to produce their own antitoxin VNA proteins over a prolonged period of time, thus preventing illness from toxin exposures.

The second part of the study showed that mice were rapidly protected from C. botulinum toxin exposure by the same VNA gene therapy, surviving even when treated 90 minutes after the toxin exposure.

“We envision this treatment approach having a broad range of applications such as protecting military personnel from biothreat agents or protecting the public from other toxin-mediated diseases such as C. difficile and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections,” said Shoemaker, the paper’s senior author. “More research is being conducted with VNA gene therapy and it’s hard to deny the potential of this rapid-acting and long-lasting therapy in treating these and several other important illnesses.”

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Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

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Efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures shown in mouse study

The current method to treat acute toxin poisoning is to inject antibodies, commonly produced in animals, to neutralize the toxin. But this method has challenges ranging from safety to difficulties in developing, producing and maintaining the anti-serums in large quantities.

New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the August 29 issue of PLOS ONE.

Shoemaker has been studying gene therapy as a novel way to treat diseases such as botulism, a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Despite the relatively small number of botulism poisoning cases nationally, there are global concerns that the toxin can be produced easily and inexpensively for bioterrorism use. Botulism, like E. coli food poisoning and C. difficile infection, is a toxin-mediated disease, meaning it occurs from a toxin that is produced by a microbial infection.

Shoemaker’s previously reported antitoxin treatments use proteins produced from the genetic material extracted from alpacas that were immunized against a toxin. Alpacas, which are members of the camelid family, produce an unusual type of antibody that is particularly useful in developing effective, inexpensive antitoxin agents. A small piece of the camelid antibody — called a VHH — can bind to and neutralize the botulism toxin. The research team has found that linking two or more different toxin-neutralizing VHHs results in VHH-based neutralizing agents (VNAs) that have extraordinary antitoxin potency and can be produced as a single molecule in bacteria at low cost. Additionally, VNAs have a longer shelf life than traditional antibodies so they can be better stored until needed.

The newly published PLOS ONE study assessed the long-term efficacy of the therapy and demonstrated that a single gene therapy treatment led to prolonged production of VNA in blood and protected the mice from subsequent exposures to C. botulinum toxin for up to several months. Virtually all mice pretreated with VNA gene therapy survived when exposed to a normally lethal dose of botulinum toxin administered up to nine weeks later. Approximately 40 percent survived when exposed to this toxin as late as 13 or 17 weeks post-treatment. With gene therapy the VNA genetic material is delivered to animals by a vector that induces the animals to produce their own antitoxin VNA proteins over a prolonged period of time, thus preventing illness from toxin exposures.

The second part of the study showed that mice were rapidly protected from C. botulinum toxin exposure by the same VNA gene therapy, surviving even when treated 90 minutes after the toxin exposure.

“We envision this treatment approach having a broad range of applications such as protecting military personnel from biothreat agents or protecting the public from other toxin-mediated diseases such as C. difficile and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections,” said Shoemaker, the paper’s senior author. “More research is being conducted with VNA gene therapy and it’s hard to deny the potential of this rapid-acting and long-lasting therapy in treating these and several other important illnesses.”

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Tufts University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures shown in mouse study

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Bone Marrow Stem Cells Improve Heart Function, Study Finds – Video



Bone Marrow Stem Cells Improve Heart Function, Study Finds
A research network led by a Mayo Clinic physician found that stem cells derived from heart failure patients' own bone marrow and injected into their hearts i…

By: Scientific American

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Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Published on August 30, 2014 at 2:57 AM

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. These findings could have implications that extend beyond cancer, including treatments for inborn immunodeficiency and metabolic conditions and autoimmune diseases.

In an article published Aug. 29 in PLOS ONE, researchers from the Charles C. Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology and Taiga Biotechnologies, Inc. said they have uncovered the keys to the molecular code that appear to regulate the ability of blood stem cells to reproduce and retain their stem-like characteristics.

The team developed protein products that can be directly administered to blood stem cells to encourage them to multiply without permanent genetic modifications.

“Use of stem cells to treat cancer patients who face bone marrow transplants has been a common practice for four decades,” said Yosef Refaeli, Ph.D., an associate dermatology professor and one of the study’s lead scientists. “The biggest challenge, however, has been finding adequate supplies of stem cells that help patients fight infection after the procedure.”

Gates Stem Cell Center Director Dennis Roop, Ph.D., recognized the magnitude of the team’s work.

“Researchers have long attempted to increase the number of blood stem cells in a lab,” Roop said. “Most of those approaches have been limited by the nature of the resulting cells or the inadequate number of cells produced.”

The technology described in the PLOS ONE article has worked with blood stem cells obtained from cord blood, adult bone marrow or peripheral blood from adults.

“The ability to multiply blood stem cells from any source in a dish will be critical for adoption of this new technology in clinics,” said Brian Turner, Ph.D., MHS, Taiga Biotechnologies’ chief scientific officer. Dr. Turner is also one of the paper’s lead authors.

The goal now is to move the technology from the lab into clinical trials. Taiga Biotechnologies is in the process of setting up first-in-human clinical trials with the blood stem cell expansion approaches described in the article. The clinical applications for expanded human blood stem cells vary from inborn immunodeficiency conditions, like SCID and sickle cell anemia, to metabolic conditions, like Hurler’s disease or Gaucher syndrome. Autoimmune diseases that could be affected include severe multiple sclerosis and lupus. And the types of cancer that could be treated as a result of this research include leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and other types of solid tumors.

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Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

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CU scientists' discovery could lead to new cancer treatment

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

29-Aug-2014

Contact: Kris Kitto kris@morethanpr.com 303-320-7790 The Bawmann Group

AURORA, Colo. (Sept. 2, 2014) A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. These findings could have implications that extend beyond cancer, including treatments for inborn immunodeficiency and metabolic conditions and autoimmune diseases.

In an article published Aug. 29 in PLOS ONE, researchers from the Charles C. Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology and Taiga Biotechnologies, Inc. said they have uncovered the keys to the molecular code that appear to regulate the ability of blood stem cells to reproduce and retain their stem-like characteristics.

The team developed protein products that can be directly administered to blood stem cells to encourage them to multiply without permanent genetic modifications.

“Use of stem cells to treat cancer patients who face bone marrow transplants has been a common practice for four decades,” said Yosef Refaeli, Ph.D., an associate dermatology professor and one of the study’s lead scientists. “The biggest challenge, however, has been finding adequate supplies of stem cells that help patients fight infection after the procedure.”

Gates Stem Cell Center Director Dennis Roop, Ph.D., recognized the magnitude of the team’s work.

“Researchers have long attempted to increase the number of blood stem cells in a lab,” Roop said. “Most of those approaches have been limited by the nature of the resulting cells or the inadequate number of cells produced.”

The technology described in the PLOS ONE article has worked with blood stem cells obtained from cord blood, adult bone marrow or peripheral blood from adults.

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CU scientists' discovery could lead to new cancer treatment

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How zebrafish forms its stripes revealed

A new research has revealed that three major pigment cell types i.e. black cells, reflective silvery cells, and yellow cells helped in forming the stripes on zebrafish.

The research conducted by Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tubingen showed that the yellow cells undergo dramatic changes in cell shape to tint the stripe pattern of zebrafish.

First author Prateek Mahalwar said that they were surprised to observe such cell behaviours, which were totally unexpected color pattern formation.

The study revealed that the three cell types reached the skin by completely different routes. A pluripotent cell population situated at the dorsal side of the embryo gave rise to larval yellow cells, which covered the skin of the embryo and began to multiply at the onset of metamorphosis when the fish was about two to three weeks old.

However, the black and silvery cells came from a small set of stem cells, which is associated with nerve nodes located close to the spinal cord in each segment.

Brigitte Walderich, a co-author of the Science paper, explained that they were surprised to discover that the small clusters of fluorescently labelled cells in the embryo, which could be followed during larval and juvenile stages to unravel growth and behaviour of the yellow cells, divided and multiplied as differentiated cells to cover the skin of the fish before the silvery and black cells arrive to form the stripes.

The study is published in journal Science.

(Posted on 29-08-2014)

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How zebrafish forms its stripes revealed

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How the zebrafish gets its stripes: Uncovering how beautiful color patterns can develop in animals

The zebrafish, a small fresh water fish, owes its name to a striking pattern of blue stripes alternating with golden stripes. Three major pigment cell types, black cells, reflective silvery cells, and yellow cells emerge during growth in the skin of the tiny juvenile fish and arrange as a multilayered mosaic to compose the characteristic colour pattern. While it was known that all three cell types have to interact to form proper stripes, the embryonic origin of the pigment cells that develop the stripes of the adult fish has remained a mystery up to now. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tbingen have now discovered how these cells arise and behave to form the ‘zebra’ pattern. Their work may help to understand the development and evolution of the great diversity of striking patterns in the animal world.

Beauty in the living world amazes poets, philosophers and scientists alike. Nobel prize laureate Christiane Nsslein-Volhard, Director of the Department for Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, has long been fascinated by the biology behind the colour patterns displayed by animals. Her group uses zebrafish as a model organism to study the genetic basis of animal development.

New research by Nsslein-Volhard’s laboratory published in Science shows that the yellow cells undergo dramatic changes in cell shape to tint the stripe pattern of zebrafish. “We were surprised to observe such cell behaviours, as these were totally unexpected from what we knew about colour pattern formation,” says Prateek Mahalwar, first author of the study. The study builds on a previous work from the laboratory, which was published in June this year in Nature Cell Biology (NCB), tracing the cell behaviour of silvery and black cells. Both studies describe diligent experiments to uncover the cellular events during stripe pattern formation. Individual juvenile fish carrying fluorescently labelled pigment cell precursors were imaged every day for up to three weeks to chart out the cellular behaviours. This enabled the scientists to trace the multiplication, migration and spreading of individual cells and their progeny over the entire patterning process of stripe formation in the living and growing animal. “We had to develop a very gentle procedure to be able to observe individual fish repeatedly over long periods of time. So we used a state of the art microscope which allowed us to reduce the adverse effects of fluorescence illumination to a minimum,” says Ajeet Singh, first author of the earlier NCB study.

Surprisingly, the analysis revealed that the three cell types reach the skin by completely different routes: A pluripotent cell population situated at the dorsal side of the embryo gives rise to larval yellow cells, which cover the skin of the embryo. These cells begin to multiply at the onset of metamorphosis when the fish is about two to three weeks old. However, the black and silvery cells come from a small set of stem cells associated with nerve nodes located close to the spinal cord in each segment. The black cells reach the skin migrating along the segmental nerves to appear in the stripe region, whereas the silvery cells pass through the longitudinal cleft that separates the musculature and then multiply and spread in the skin.

Brigitte Walderich, a co-author of the Science paper, who performed cell transplantations to trace the origin of yellow cells, explains: “My attempt was to create small clusters of fluorescently labelled cells in the embryo which could be followed during larval and juvenile stages to unravel growth and behaviour of the yellow cells. We were surprised to discover that they divide and multiply as differentiated cells to cover the skin of the fish before the silvery and black cells arrive to form the stripes.”

A striking observation is that both the silvery and yellow cells are able to switch cell shape and colour, depending on their location. The yellow cells compact to closely cover the dense silvery cells forming the light stripe, colouring it golden, and acquire a loose stellate shape over the black cells of the stripes. The silvery cells thinly spread over the stripe region, giving it a blue tint. They switch shape again at a distance into the dense form to aggregate, forming a new light stripe. These cell behaviours create a series of alternating light and dark stripes. The precise superposition of the dense form of silvery and yellow cells in the light stripe, and the loose silvery and yellow cells superimposed over the black cells in the stripe cause the striking contrast between the golden and blue coloration of the pattern.

The authors speculate that variations on these cell behaviours could be at play in generating the great diversity of colour patterns in fish. “These findings inform our way of thinking about colour pattern formation in other fish, but also in animals which are not accessible to direct observation during development such as peacocks, tigers and zebras,” says Nsslein-Volhard — wondering how her cats got their stripes.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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How the zebrafish gets its stripes: Uncovering how beautiful color patterns can develop in animals

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Embryology IPS Cell Therapy IPS Cell Therapy

MCAT embryology Based on Kaplan’s notes for MCAT biology and Jason Mraz’s song. Lyrics are as follows: First is a zygote, then an embryo, then a blastula with a blastocoel Trophoblast outside the inner cell

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How to Pronounce Embryo-logical Can we reach 1 Like? Watch video to the end embryology /mbrildi/ [em-bree-ol-uh-jee] noun, , plural embryologies. 1.the science dealing with the formation, development, structure,

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Embryology Gastrointestinal Tract Development Part 1 ( High yield ) These videos are designed for medical students studying for the USMLE step 1 . I took step 1 when i was in 5th grade , my step 1 score : 241 , i did these vi

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Bala Cynwyd, PA (PRWEB) August 25, 2014

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Embryology IPS Cell Therapy IPS Cell Therapy

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Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How have the stem cell therapy results been so far – Video



Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How have the stem cell therapy results been so far
http://www.thanyapurahealth.com/health-services/natural-stem-cell-activationregenerative-therapy/stem-cell-activation-phuket-thailand-how-have-the-stem-cell-therapy-results-been-so-far/ Client…

By: Thanyapura Health Centre

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Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How is your stem cell therapy different – Video



Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How is your stem cell therapy different
http://www.thanyapurahealth.com/health-services/natural-stem-cell-activationregenerative-therapy/how-is-your-stem-cell-therapy-different/ Thanyapura Health offers natural stem cell activation,…

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Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How is your stem cell therapy different – Video

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Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How have athletes been using stem cell therapy – Video



Stem Cell Activation Phuket, Thailand: How have athletes been using stem cell therapy
http://www.thanyapurahealth.com/health-services/natural-stem-cell-activationregenerative-therapy/how-have-athletes-been-using-stem-cell-therapy/ Using stem cell therapy treats body issue e.g….

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Stem Cell Activation Phuket: What type of clients have you been seeing for stem cell therapy – Video



Stem Cell Activation Phuket: What type of clients have you been seeing for stem cell therapy
http://www.thanyapurahealth.com/health-services/natural-stem-cell-activationregenerative-therapy/what-type-of-clients-have-you-been-seeing-for-stem-cell-therapy/ Wide range of client who has…

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Jilly’s Miracle post stem cell therapy at Australind Veterinary Hospital – Video



Jilly's Miracle post stem cell therapy at Australind Veterinary Hospital
Jilly pain free following stem cell therapy at Australind Veterinary Hospital.

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Jed and Kendra Ice Bucket Challenge – Video



Jed and Kendra Ice Bucket Challenge
Kendra and Jed taking Kalen up on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. We will be making donations to the United Mitochondrial Foundation http://www.umdf.org as well as the Cell Therapy Foundation…

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Dr. Andrew Aiken on Stem Cell Banking – Oral Surgery Specialists of Atlanta | Atlanta, GA – Video



Dr. Andrew Aiken on Stem Cell Banking – Oral Surgery Specialists of Atlanta | Atlanta, GA
http://www.oralsurgeryspecialistsatlanta.com Oral Surgery Specialists of Atlanta 3280 Howell Mill Road Suite 240 West Wing Atlanta, GA 30327 Phone: (404) 351-5335 Fax: (404) 351-1339 Services…

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Gene Research Yields Insights Into Ebola Virus

By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter Latest Infectious Disease News

THURSDAY, Aug. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Genetic research performed during the early days of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has given scientists unprecedented insight into how the virus mutates and spreads.

Researchers report in the Aug. 28 online issue of Science that they have now determined the following:

The researchers’ efforts have quadrupled the amount of genetic data available on Ebola, creating mounds of new and publicly available information about the DNA structure of the deadly virus, said senior study author Dr. Pardis Sabeti.

Sabeti is a senior associate member at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and an associate professor at Harvard University.

The ongoing Ebola outbreak has infected 3,069 people and claimed the lives of 1,552, according to the World Health Organization.

The genetic researchers rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola viruses from 78 patients in Sierra Leone during the first 24 days of the outbreak there.

Government health officials traced the entrance of Ebola into Sierra Leone to the burial of a traditional healer who had treated patients in neighboring Guinea. Thirteen women who attended the burial contracted Ebola, and researchers drew viral samples from these women to begin genetic sequencing.

Such genetic data is comparable to “fingerprints at the scene of the crime,” said Dr. Lee Norman, chief medical officer of the University of Kansas Hospital.

“It tells you so much about how and where the virus came from, and what we can do about it,” Norman said.

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Gene Research Yields Insights Into Ebola Virus

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Oligonucleotide Synthesis Market Worth $1,712.1 Million by 2019

DALLAS, August 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — According to the new research report " Oligonucleotide Synthesis Market by Product & Services (Equipment, Reagent, Primer, Probe, Custom Oligos), End-User …

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Oligonucleotide Synthesis Market Worth $1,712.1 Million by 2019

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Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Published on August 29, 2014 at 2:48 AM

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients’ developmental disabilities.

Using whole-exome sequencing – a method that examines the parts of genes that regulate protein, called exons – the team identified a genetic change in a newly recognized autism-associated gene, Activity-Dependent Neuroprotective Protein (ADNP), in a girl with developmental delay. This change in the ADNP gene helps explain the cause of developmental delay in this patient. This same genetic change in ADNP was also found in a boy who was diagnosed with autism.

The ADNP gene plays an important role in regulation of early brain development. Recently, genetic changes in this gene have been found to cause a novel genetic syndrome associated with autism. Changes in this gene may be among the most common causes of autism.

“Genetic testing is a very powerful diagnostic tool for individuals with developmental delay,” said Eric Morrow, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Developmental Disorder Genetics Research Program at Bradley Hospital and lead author of the study. “Through genetic testing, which is available to some in the clinical setting as well as in research, a medical diagnosis is possible for a large subset of patients.”

Morrow continued, “Genetic changes in ADNP are highly associated with autism and are found in at least .17 percent of autism cases. In these patients, changes in this gene represent an important part of the medical cause for developmental delay and/or autism. The use of these genome-wide sequencing methods in patients with developmental disorders is one of the best examples of the applications of modern genomics in clinical practice.”

This study represents one of the first publications resulting in part from Morrow’s work with the Rhode Island Collaborative for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART), which is co-led by Morrow. Funding for RI-CART is provided in part by a grant from the Simons Foundation for Autism Research and also through support from the Brown Institute for Brain Science (BIBS), the Norman Prince Neuroscience Institute at Rhode Island Hospital, the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University, Women & Infants Hospital and the Groden Network. This cross-disciplinary collaboration, including the work of Chanika Phornphutkul, M.D., director of Hasbro Children’s Hospital’s division of Clinical Genetics, and the paper’s lead authors from several departments and training programs, represents an important development in research and clinical care for patients.

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Posted in: Medical Science News | Medical Research News | Medical Condition News

Tags: Autism, Biochemistry, Brain, Cell, Developmental Disorder, Exons, Gene, Genes, Genetic, Genetics, Genomics, Health Care, Hospital, Medical School, Mental Health, Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, Protein, Psychiatry

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Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

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