Hypopituitarism – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

Posted: June 4, 2018 at 10:42 am

Diagnosis

If your doctor suspects a pituitary disorder, he or she will likely order several tests to check levels of various hormones in your body. Your doctor may also want to check for hypopituitarism if you’ve had a recent head injury or radiation treatment that might have put you at risk of damage to your pituitary gland.

Tests your doctor may order include:

Successful treatment of the underlying condition causing hypopituitarism may lead to a complete or partial recovery of your body’s normal production of pituitary hormones. Treatment with the appropriate hormones is often the first step. These drugs are considered as “replacement,” rather than treatment, because the dosages are set to match the amounts that your body would normally manufacture if it didn’t have a pituitary problem. Treatment may be lifelong.

Treatment for pituitary tumors may involve surgery to remove the growth. In some instances, doctors also recommend radiation treatment.

Hormone replacement medications may include:

If you’ve become infertile, LH and FSH (gonadotropins) can be administered by injection to stimulate ovulation in women and sperm production in men.

A doctor who specializes in endocrine disorders (endocrinologist) may monitor the levels of these hormones in your blood to ensure you’re getting adequate but not excessive amounts.

Your doctor will advise you to adjust your dosage of corticosteroids if you become seriously ill or experience major physical stress. During these times, your body would ordinarily produce extra cortisol hormone. The same kind of fine-tuning of dosage may be necessary when you have the flu, experience diarrhea or vomiting, or have surgery or dental procedures. Adjustments in dosage may also be necessary during pregnancy or with marked changes in weight. You may need periodic CT or MRI scans as well to monitor a pituitary tumor or other diseases causing the hypopituitarism.

Wear a medical alert bracelet or pendant, and carry a special card, notifying others in emergency situations, for example that you’re taking corticosteroids and other medications.

You’re likely to start by seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner. However, in some cases, when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred to a specialist called an endocrinologist.

Here’s some information to help you prepare for your appointment.

Create a list of questions before your appointment so that you can make the most of your time with your doctor. For hypopituitarism, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

Don’t hesitate to ask any questions you have during your appointment.

Your doctor is likely to ask you some questions, such as:

Aug. 22, 2017

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Hypopituitarism – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

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