New knee op using stem cells could stop arthritis and extend sporting careers

Posted: July 23, 2014 at 4:49 pm

Surgeons at the University Hospital Southampton have designed the new procedure to coat damaged cartilage with stem cells taken from the hip If successful, it will regenerate the remaining tissue, creating a permanent 'like-for-like' replacement for the first time Cartilage is a tough tissue covering the surface of joints and enables bones to slide over one another, reducing friction and acting as a shock absorber

By Lizzie Parry

Published: 07:05 EST, 23 July 2014 | Updated: 07:21 EST, 23 July 2014

Surgeons have designed a new operation which they hope could prevent the development of arthritis and extend sporting careers.

The procedure, which is currently being trialled at Southampton General Hospital, involves coating damaged cartilage with stem cells, taken from a patients own hip, and surgical glue.

If successful, it will regenerate the remaining tissue and create a permanent 'like-for-like' replacement for the first time.

Surgeons at University Hospital Southampton have pioneered a new operation to treat knee injuries, which they hope will extend sporting careers. Argentinian striker Luis Suarez had an operation to remove his damaged meniscus, part of the cartilage in the knee, prior to the World Cup

Cartilage is a tough, flexible tissue that covers the surface of joints and enables bones to slide over one another while reducing friction and acting as a shock absorber.

Damage to the tissue in the knee is common and occurs mainly following sudden twists or direct blows, such as falls or heavy tackles playing sports such as football and rugby, but can also develop over time through gradual wear and tear.

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New knee op using stem cells could stop arthritis and extend sporting careers

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