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Market Research Projects US Personalized Medicine Market Growth at 9.5% CAGR Through 2015

ROCKVILLE, MD--(Marketwire -02/16/12)- MarketResearch.com has announced the addition of the new report "Personalized Medicine Market Analysis," to their collection of Biotechnology market reports. For more information, visit http://www.marketresearch.com/RNCOS-v3175/Personalized-Medicine-6746156/

With the increasing knowledge of human DNA, a new segment called personalized medicines has emerged in the healthcare industry, which includes therapeutics, diagnostics, and theranostics tailored towards the treatment or prevention of disease. Even though personalized medicines are in their nascent stages, it is expected to transform the biopharmaceutical and molecular diagnostics markets in the coming years.

According to "Personalized Medicine Market Analysis," the US market for personalized medicine is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of around 9.5% during 2009-2015. The growth will be driven by factors, such as treatment cost savings, early detection of diseases, patient compliance, drug safety, and optimization of therapies.

The US has the major share in the global personalized medicine market. But with the advancements, countries like the UK, France, Germany, India, China, and Japan have also been trying to establish themselves in the market. In order to promote the development of personalized medicines, huge money is being invested. For instance, US$780 Million have been invested in the UK to establish an institute for aiding the development of clinical applications to fight cancer, heart diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Strategic alliances, like the Abbott Laboratories with Pfizer are also being formed. Academic and private research institutions as well as small biotech and major pharmaceutical companies are increasingly looking for alternative ways to strengthen their pipelines.

The research reveals that personalized medicines for cancer are dominating the market, accounting for more than half of the total personalized medicines which are commercially available. The therapeutic applications of personalized medicines have been extending to new areas, like HIV, cardiovascular disorders, neurological disorders, etc. It is expected that these applications will grab a bigger piece of the pie in the coming years.

Providing an extensive information and rational analysis of the global personalized medicine market, the research report thoroughly examines current market trends and industrial developments to enable clients with a proper understanding of the market structure and its future progress. The study also provides an insight into the segment-wise competitive landscape, which includes the profiles of Pharmaceutical/Biotech, Diagnostic, IT/Informatics, and Research Tool companies across the globe.

For more information, visit http://www.marketresearch.com/RNCOS-v3175/Personalized-Medicine-6746156/

About MarketResearch.com

MarketResearch.com is the leading provider of global market intelligence products and services. With over 300,000 research reports from more than 700 top consulting and advisory firms, MarketResearch.com offers instant online access to the world's most extensive database of expert insights on global industries, companies, products, and trends. For more information, call Veronica Franco at 240-747-3016 or visit http://www.MarketResearch.com.

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Market Research Projects US Personalized Medicine Market Growth at 9.5% CAGR Through 2015

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UNM Eyes Finalists for Fine Arts Dean Post

POSTED AT: 6:50 am

Four finalists have been selected in a search to replace interim Dean of the College of Fine Arts Jim Linnell, who suffered a spinal cord injury in Mexico over the winter break, the New Mexico Daily Lobo reported.

Linnell announced last semester that he would be stepping down as dean in June, and a search committee formed last fall received numerous applications from around the country, settling on four finalists, the Daily Lobo said.

The finalists are: Judith Thorpe, professor and head of the Art & Art History Department at the University of Connecticut’s School of Fine Arts; Ronald Shields, professor and chair of the Department of Theatre and Film at Bowling Green State University; Kymberly Pinder, professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she has served as graduate program head and department chair; and Sanjit Sethi, director of the Center for Art and Public Life and the Barclay Simpson chair of community art at California College of the Arts.

Linnell underwent surgery at the UNM Hospital trauma center on Dec. 29 after receiving initial medical care in Mexico, family members said in a statement.

The statement went on to say that the surgery was successful, that Linnell is in stable condition and will soon begin rehabilitation at a spinal injury clinic in Denver, the Daily Lobo said.

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UNM Eyes Finalists for Fine Arts Dean Post

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$24 million approved for design phase of Brockton VA expansion

The federal government has already approved $24 million for the design of the proposed new spinal cord injury unit and renovation of the old complex at the Brockton VA hospital, federal budget documents show.

The hospital now needs $163 million more to construct the building and renovate the older building, according to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs budget documents.

The $188 million project would use a soccer field next to Building 8 for the construction of a 96-bed, long-term care, spinal cord injury unit. Upon completion, the existing 60-bed spinal cord injury unit in Building 8 would be renovated to become an outpatient mental health facility.

But the $163 million needed to complete the process is subject to upcoming budget negotiations.

“Hopefully these will get funded,” said Diane Keefe, a spokesman for the VA Boston Healthcare System. “The budget process is just beginning. (President Obama) just released his budget proposal so the budget has to be approved.”

Obama requested $140.3 billion for the department’s budget, with $52.7 billion earmarked for medical care.

The Brockton campus of the VA Boston Healthcare System, 940 Belmont St., received $24 million in 2009 for the designing of both the new building and the renovation of the older building.

The construction phase of the project is one of 21 projects nationwide that were already started and await completion. The projects in total need $5.9 billion more in funding for completion, according to VA budget documents for fiscal year 2013.

The hospital, which sits on 145 acres of federally owned land, opened in 1953. The complex has 26 buildings connected by an underground tunnel system.

The Brockton campus totals about 1.1 million square feet of hospital space and has 418 total beds. It handles long-term care, spinal cord injuries, mental health, substance abuse, and outpatient care. The campus also boasts a gymnasium and a therapeutic indoor swimming pool.

U.S. Rep Stephen Lynch told The Patriot Ledger editorial board on Monday he is working to secure the remaining funds to complete the project.

“While these funds have yet to be approved, I remain committed to helping the Brockton VA secure this funding,” Lynch said in a statement Tuesday. “Our veterans deserve the very best care we as a nation can offer.”

The new building, Lynch said in the editorial board meeting, would be a more appropriate setting for the hospital’s medical technology.

Lynch also mentioned a goal of securing funds for a clinical addition to the West Roxbury campus, which has 188 beds, originally opening in 1943. According to the budget documents released Monday, the clinical addition to the hospital, which would cost an estimated $296 million, is fourth on the VA’s list of 1,154-item budget priority list.

Alex Bloom may be reached at abloom@enterprisenews.com.

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High doses of ‘load’ slows loss of bone in spinal cord injury

Public release date: 16-Feb-2012
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Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Loss of bone density leads to brittle bones that fracture easily. It is a major complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), which affects about 250,000 Americans every year.

A new clinical trial conducted by University of Iowa researchers shows that delivering high doses of "load," or stress, to bone through programmed electrical stimulation of the muscle significantly slows the loss of bone density in patients with SCI.

The focus on quantifying the effective dose of load is one of the study's most important aspects, says Richard Shields, P.T., Ph.D., a professor and director of the UI Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science Graduate Programs. The study also is the first to carefully test the impact of different doses of load in humans with paralysis.

Previous research had suggested that stressing or loading bone through muscle contractions could slow the loss of bone density, but results from clinical trials have been mixed.

"Thirty years ago a clinical trial concluded that putting patients with SCI in an upright weight-bearing position with braces or standing frames did nothing to prevent loss of bone density," Shields says. "The novelty of our study is we have designed a method for individuals with paralysis to stand (bear weight) while superimposing a dose of muscle force using programmed electrical stimulation of the muscle."

The study findings, published in the journal Osteoporosis International in December 2011, reveal that only high "doses" of muscle force are effective for significantly reducing bone loss.

"The previous studies, without muscle activation, were like doing a drug trial where the dose of drug was too low, or below 'therapeutic threshold,' to cause an effect," Shields explains.

The UI researchers have also recently shown that the electrical stimulation strengthens muscle by activating genes that promote muscle growth and endurance, and improve glucose metabolism.

Testing doses of load

The clinical trial developed by Shields and his team is based on biomechanical modeling and information from bone biology studies that show that bone cells, called osteoblasts, produce new bone only when the load is high enough.

The study compared the effect of "high dose" loads of 150 percent of body weight (induced by electrically stimulating the quadriceps muscle in one leg while the patient was supported in a standing position) with "low dose" load of 40 percent body weight (assisted standing with no electrical stimulation) and "no dose" loads of 0 percent body weight (sitting). Participants were asked to perform their training five times per week for three years and had their bone mineral density and muscle strength tested several times over the study period.

"When we applied a load of 1.5 times their body weight using electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle we saw a significant impact on the bone density as well as the expected growth of the skeletal muscle," says Shields.

Specifically, the study found that after three years, average bone density in the femur was almost 40 percent lower in patients who received low dose or no dose load compared to patients who received high dose. The study also showed that high dose load slows the deterioration of the trabecular bone -- the type of bone found at the joint ends of long bones where fractures most often occur.

"Keeping 40 percent of the bone material in the bone should translate into improved overall health along several dimensions, including reducing the risk of fracture, as well as reducing other common complications stemming from SCI, like kidney stones and diabetes," says Shields.

A unique feature of the study was that patients in the high dose group only received muscle stimulation on one leg. This meant that the patients' non-treated leg provided a "within subject" control that clearly contrasted the effect of high dose compared to low dose when all other factors were the same.

Usability key for translating study findings to therapy

Shields notes that for any treatment regimen to be truly useful for patients, it must be something that a patient can easily incorporate in his or her daily life. The study suggested that participants found it fairly easy to stick with the training program. In addition, six of the seven participants on the high-dose protocol were able to participate from home using a specially modified wheelchair that raised them to a standing position and custom-designed stimulators that automatically logged the participant's training.

"It is much harder to make brittle bones strong again. So in a situation where we know that loss of bone density will occur, like SCI, we need an intervention that prevents or at least slows down the loss of bone density," Shields says. "This study provides evidence that there is a mechanical dose of load through muscle force that the skeleton can respond to that has an effect."

###

The study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation, and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation.

In addition to Shields, the study team included Shauna Dudley-Javoroski, P.T., Ph.D., Shih-Chiao Tseng, P.T., Ph.D., Punam Saha, Ph.D., Manish Suneja, M.D., Chris Adams, M.D., Ph.D., Andy Littmann, P.T., Elizabeth Faidley, Michael Petrie, Brandon Campbell, Zhiyun Gao, and Colleen McHenry.

STORY SOURCE: University of Iowa Health Care Media Relations, 200 Hawkins Drive, Room W319 GH, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1009

MEDIA CONTACT: Jennifer Brown, 319-356-7124, jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu


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Histogenics to Present at 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit

WALTHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Histogenics Corporation, a privately held regenerative medicine company, today announced that the Company will present at the 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit on February 21st at Bridgewaters New York City. Kirk Andriano, Ph.D., Vice President of Research and Development for Histogenics, will speak about current and future cell therapies being developed by the Company as it works toward commercialization. Lead candidates include NeoCart®, an autologous bioengineered neocartilage grown outside the body using the patient’s own cells for the regeneration of cartilage lesions, and VeriCart™, a three-dimensional cartilage matrix designed to stimulate cartilage repair in a simple, one-step procedure. NeoCart recently entered a Phase 3 clinical trial after reporting positive Phase 2 data, in which all primary endpoints were met and a favorable safety profile was demonstrated.

Dr. Andriano earned his BS in chemistry and biology from Utah State University and his MS and Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Utah. Prior to his work at Histogenics, he was the Chief Technology Officer for ProChon Biotech, Ltd. which was acquired by Histogenics in May 2011.

About Histogenics

Histogenics is a leading regenerative medicine company that combines cell therapy and tissue engineering technologies to develop highly innovative products for tissue repair and regeneration. In May of 2011, Histogenics acquired Israeli cell-therapy company ProChon BioTech. Histogenics’ flagship products focus on the treatment of active patients suffering from articular cartilage derived pain and immobility. The Company takes an interdisciplinary approach to engineering neocartilage that looks, acts and lasts like hyaline cartilage. It is developing new treatments for sports injuries and other orthopaedic conditions, where demand is growing for long-term alternatives to joint replacement. Histogenics has successfully completed Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials of its NeoCart autologous tissue implant and is currently in a Phase 3 IND clinical study. Based in Waltham, Massachusetts, the company is privately held. For more information, visit http://www.histogenics.com.

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Histogenics to Present at 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit

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Biomask: Improving Facial Burn Treatment for Soldiers in the Field

Current treatments for facial injuries often lead to disfigurement or speech impediments, but the Biomask could change regenerative medicine.

It's estimated that 85 percent of injuries to our armed forces in the field cause damage to the extremities or the face. Innovations in regenerative medicine are moving along at an amazing pace, but the common current facial burns treatment typically involves removing damaged areas, followed by skin grafting, which usually leads to disfigurement and the possibility of speech impediments and scarring.

A new project called Biomask, a collaboration between engineers at the University of Texas, Arlington; Northwestern University regenerative medicine specialists; leaders in burn treatment at Brooke Army Medical Center; and consultants Army Institute of Surgical Research seeks to improve burn treatment outcomes with the latest in medical electronics and regenerative medicine.

The Biomask consists of two layers: The top layer is a hard shell that protects the wearer's face and stores the electronic components. The second layer is a polymer mask that will fit around the contours of the face. The polymer also acts as a seal around the wounds which compresses them to prevent lumpy scar formation. The polymer shell is also embedded with a number of sensors and actuators to monitor the healing process and send data to physicians.

While the mask itself will already improve treatment outcomes, Biomask takes it a step further by featuring a network of microtubes and valves in the polymer layer that will constantly deliver therapeutics, such as painkillers, antibiotics, and stem cells to the parts of the face that the onboard sensors determine.

Altogether, this makes Biomask a highly customized and automated 24/7 treatment system that researchers hope will make healing faster and better.

This post also appears on medGadget, an Atlantic partner site.

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Biomask: Improving Facial Burn Treatment for Soldiers in the Field

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Cytomedix to Showcase Aldagen’s Promising Autologous Cell Therapy Technology at Two Regenerative Medicine Meetings

GAITHERSBURG, MD--(Marketwire -02/16/12)- Cytomedix, Inc. (OTC.BB: CMXI.OB - News) (the "Company"), a leading developer of biologically active regenerative therapies for wound care, inflammation and angiogenesis, today announced that Chief Operating Officer Edward L. Field will present a clinical overview of Aldagen's autologous cell therapy technology at two upcoming meetings: The Cell Society's 2nd Annual Clinical Meeting being held February 17-18 at the Coronado Marriott Resort in San Diego; and the 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit being held on February 21 at Bridgewaters New York in New York City.

Mr. Field will present during the session, "Commercialization Opportunities with Adult Stem Cell Therapies," on Friday, February 17 from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Pacific time at the Cell Society meeting.

Cell Society International is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the clinical application of adult stem cell therapies worldwide. Cell Society's 2nd Annual Clinical Meeting will continue in the tradition established at the 1st Annual Meeting and will offer a unique opportunity for multidisciplinary, international clinical collaboration designed to enhance understanding and thought-provoking insight into treatments and cures for disease and agonizing medical conditions. This year's clinical focus will center on therapies particularly relevant to cardiology, neurology, and orthopedic and plastic surgery.

At the Stem Cell Summit, Mr. Field will present at 2:35 p.m. Eastern time. This meeting showcases more than 30 of the world's leaders in this rapidly evolving industry. The New York Stem Cell Summit brings the future of this dynamic industry to life for investors, industry, practitioners and analysts so they can learn about the investment opportunities in the stem cell marketplace, groundbreaking stem cell products that physicians use today and the growing market potential in terms of revenues.

About Cytomedix, Inc.

Cytomedix, Inc. develops, sells and licenses regenerative biological therapies primarily for wound care, inflammation and angiogenesis. The Company markets the AutoloGel™ System, a device for the production of autologous platelet rich plasma ("PRP") gel for use on a variety of exuding wounds; the Angel® Whole Blood Separation System, a blood processing device and disposable products used for the separation of whole blood into red cells, platelet poor plasma ("PPP") and PRP in surgical settings; and the activAT® Autologous Thrombin Processing Kit, which produces autologous thrombin serum from PPP. The activAT® kit is sold exclusively in Europe and Canada, where it provides a completely autologous, safe alternative to bovine-derived products. On February 8, 2012 Cytomedix announced the acquisition of Aldagen, a biopharmaceutical company developing regenerative cell therapies based on its proprietary ALDH bright cell ("ALDHbr") technology, currently in a Phase 2 trial for the treatment of ischemic stroke. For additional information please visit http://www.cytomedix.com

Safe Harbor Statement
Statements contained in this communication not relating to historical facts are forward-looking statements that are intended to fall within the safe harbor rule for such statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The information contained in the forward-looking statements is inherently uncertain, and Cytomedix' actual results may differ materially due to a number of factors, many of which are beyond Cytomedix' ability to predict or control, including many among others, risks and uncertainties related to the Company's ability to successfully integrate this acquisition, to successfully manage contemplated clinical trials, to manage and address the capital needs, human resource, management, compliance and other challenges of a larger, more complex and intergrated business enterprise, viability and effectiveness of the Company's sales approach and overall marketing strategies, commercial success or acceptance by the medical community, competitive responses, the Company's ability to raise additional capital and to continue as a going concern, and Cytomedix's ability to execute on its strategy to market the AutoloGel™ System as contemplated. To the extent that any statements made here are not historical, these statements are essentially forward-looking. The Company uses words and phrases such as "believes," "forecasted," "projects," "is expected," "remain confident," "will" and/or similar expressions to identify forward-looking statements in this press release. Undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events to differ from the forward-looking statements. More information about some of these risks and uncertainties may be found in the reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Cytomedix, Inc. Cytomedix operates in a highly competitive and rapidly changing business and regulatory environment, thus new or unforeseen risks may arise. Accordingly, investors should not place any reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results. Except as is expressly required by the federal securities laws, Cytomedix undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, changed circumstances or future events or for any other reason. Additional risks that could affect our future operating results are more fully described in our U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including our Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2010, filed with the SEC and other subsequent filings. These filings are available at http://www.sec.gov.

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Cytomedix to Showcase Aldagen's Promising Autologous Cell Therapy Technology at Two Regenerative Medicine Meetings

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Iverson Genetic Diagnostics, Inc. Announces a Strategic Partnership with Vanderbilt University for the Development and …

BOTHELL, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Iverson Genetic Diagnostics, Inc. announced today a partnership agreement with Vanderbilt University under which Iverson receives global exclusive commercialization rights for molecular diagnostics that will help physicians to assess breast cancer risk in women considering hormone replacement therapy during menopause. Research suggests that estrogen metabolites represent one of several determinants of the risk of breast cancer. Specific enzymes regulate the biochemical pathways associated with the metabolism of estrogen. Corresponding genes code for the synthesis of these enzymes. Mutations of these genes are common and have been shown in the work of Fritz Parl, M.D., Ph.D., Philip Crooke, Ph.D., William Dupont, Ph.D., and others to be associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Dr. Sujatha Reddy, M.D., OB/GYN at Premier Care for Women in Atlanta and Medical Correspondent for WXIA, a NBC affiliate in Atlanta, said, “I think I will use this test in my practice for patients who are trying to decide if they should stay on hormone replacement therapy (HRT). If you break down estrogen well, you may be at lower risk for breast cancer and then choose to continue your hormones. We can give people a more individualized therapy based on their own genetic makeup.”

Leroy Hood, M.D., Ph.D., co-founder of the Institute for Systems Biology and a member of Iverson Genetic Diagnostics’ Board of Directors, commented, “The importance of finding gene variants that affect the metabolism of drugs and hormones--hence causing disease--is incredibly important for personalized medicine. This venture between Iverson and Vanderbilt is a wonderful example of a diagnostic test that could significantly improve the health of relevant patients.”

Dean Sproles, CEO of Iverson Genetic Diagnostics, Inc., stated, “We are very pleased to collaborate with Vanderbilt University on this product and look forward to including the new e-Metab GenoSTATTM test in the Women’s Health segment of Iverson’s Physician’s LogicTM portfolio later this year. We are considering additional opportunities to partner with Vanderbilt University in the areas of Women’s Health and Autoimmunity.”

About Iverson Genetic Diagnostics, Inc.

Iverson Genetic Diagnostics, Inc. is a Nevada C corporation with administrative headquarters in Bothell, Washington, and production headquarters in Charleston, South Carolina. Iverson is establishing a recognizable global brand for providing trusted genetic tests and testing services for the emerging market of individualized medicine and genetics-based molecular diagnostics. The company’s mission is to improve patient outcomes through personalized care. Iverson is a fully credentialed laboratory service company focused on providing results within 24 hours for hospitals and physicians. Iverson’s patented technology, Physician’s LogicTM, is our healthcare information resource developed to deploy test results to providers and integrate with various electronic medical record systems in a HIPAA-compliant environment.

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Iverson Genetic Diagnostics, Inc. Announces a Strategic Partnership with Vanderbilt University for the Development and ...

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Bone Repair Stem Cell Breakthrough Shows Promise

Editor's Choice
Main Category: Stem Cell Research
Article Date: 15 Feb 2012 - 8:00 PST

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According to a study published in the February issue of the STEM CELL Translational Medicine Journal , a world-first technique for generating adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]) has been developed by researchers at the University of Queensland. This new method can be used to repair bone and possibly other organs, and will considerably affect individuals suffering from a variety of serious diseases.

Professor Nicholas Fisk, who leads the collaborative study between the UQ Clinical Research Center (UQCCR) and the UQ's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN), explained:

"We used a small molecule to induce embryonic stem cells over a 10 day period, which is much faster than other studies reported in the literature.

The technique also worked on their less contentious counterparts, induced pluripotent stem cells.

To make the pluripotent mature stem cells useful in the clinic, they have to be told what type of cell they need to become (pre-differentiated), before being administered to an injured organ, or otherwise they could form tumors.

Because only small numbers of MSCs exist in the bone marrow, and harvesting bone marrow from a healthy donor is an invasive procedure, the ability to make our own MSCs in large number in the laboratory is an exciting step in the future widespread clinical use of MSCs.

We were able to show these new forms of stem cells exhibited all the characteristics of bone marrow stem cells and we are currently examining their bone repair capability."

Ernst Wolvetang, co-researcher on the study and AIBN Associate Professor, explained that the technique had overcome a considerable obstacle in the translation of stem cell-based therapy.

Wolvetang said: "We are very excited by this research, which has brought together stem cell researchers from two of the major UQ research hubs UQCCR and AIBN."

Written by: Grace Rattue

Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our stem cell research section for the latest news on this subject. UniQuest, The University of Queensland's main commercialization company, invites parties interested in licensing the intellectual property relating to this discovery to contact UniQuest on 3365 4037 or lifesciences@uniquest.com.au.

Source: University of Queensland

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Grace Rattue. "Bone Repair Stem Cell Breakthrough Shows Promise." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 15 Feb. 2012. Web.
16 Feb. 2012. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/241706.php&gt;

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Bone Repair Stem Cell Breakthrough Shows Promise

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Juice Beauty’s to boost organic skin care further with Stem Cellular Repair line

Posted on February 17, 2012, Friday

KUCHING: Organic solutions company Juice Beauty is introducing three new products in its Stem Cellular Repair line to the public, incorporating technology and science in delivering the new products.

“The three products, namely Stem Cellular Repair Moisturiser, Stem Cellular Repair Eye Treatment and Stem Cellular Repair Booster Serum work at the cellular level to repair damage and increase cellular proliferation,” explained Juice Beauty retail outlet manager, Shirley Ann Tan.

The products were noted to have used the brand’s own proprietary blend of organic fruit stem cells injected into its clinically validated antioxidant rich organic juice base to help decrease DNA damage and accelerate cellular proliferation.

Tan stated that Juice Beauty products were antioxidant-rich and made from 100 per cent organic juices. The formulations were protected from environmental contamination with high tech airtight pump jars.

The manager added, “The reason we are so intent in creating organic products is that we want people to avoid using harmful chemicals in their skin care range for health purposes. People with eczema, skin problems and allergies could feel free to try out our organic products.”

Juice Beauty’s boasts its patent-pending juice base which does not have any drying effect on the skin or suffocate the skin as alcohol- or petroleum-based products do.

“Using an organic juice base provides the benefit of having every drop of the product feed your skin,” she highlighted.

The new products are currently available at Juice Beauty’s outlet at tHe Spring Mall.

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Juice Beauty’s to boost organic skin care further with Stem Cellular Repair line

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Synthetic protein amplifies genes needed for stem cells

Public release date: 16-Feb-2012
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Contact: Tara Womersley
tara.womersley@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-9836
University of Edinburgh

Scientists have found a way to generate and maintain stem cells much more efficiently by amplifying the effect of an essential protein.

Researchers from Denmark, Scotland and the USA have created synthetic versions of a protein, which manipulates adult cells ? such as skin cells ? so that they can subsequently revert to an earlier, embryonic like state. These reverted cells have the potential to become any cell in the body.

As well as reverting adult cells to this state ? known as induced pluripotent stem cells , the protein also plays a key role in maintaining embryonic stem cells in a pure form. If the protein ? Oct4 ? is not present, the embryonic stem cells will start to differentiate into specific cells.

In order to reprogamme adult cells to have stem cell properties viruses need to be added to cell cultures to trigger production of significant quantities of Oct4.

Oct4 plays a powerful role in regulating stem cell genes. However, while large quantities of Oct4 are needed too much of it can ruin the properties of stem cells.

Scientists, whose work is published in the journal Cell Reports, were able to overcome this by producing a synthetic version of Oct4 that amplified the effect of the protein in its natural form.

The synthetic version of Oct4 was much more efficient in turning on genes that instruct cells on how to be stem cells and, as a result, the cells did not need as much Oct4 for either reprogramming or to remain as stem cells ? thereby eliminating problems caused by too much Oct4.

In fact, the synthetic Oct4 could support stem cells under conditions that they do not normally grow. These findings could also help scientists find new ways generate stem cells in the laboratory.

The study showed that Oct4 was mainly responsible for turning on genes that instruct cells on how to become stem cells, rather than turning off genes that encourage the cells to differentiate.

"Our discovery is an important step towards generating and maintaining stem cells much more effectively," says Professor Joshua Brickman, affiliated with both The Danish Stem Cell Center (DanStem), University of Copenhagen and Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh.

"Embryonic stem cells are characterized, among other things, by their ability to perpetuate themselves indefinitely and differentiate into all the cell types in the body ? a trait called pluripotency. But to be able to use them medically, we need to be able to maintain them in a pure state, until they're needed. When we want to turn a stem cell into a specific cell, such as insulin producing beta cell, or a nerve cell in the brain, we'd like this process to occur accurately and efficiently. This will not be possible if we don't understand how to maintain stem cells as stem cells. As well as maintaining embryonic stem cells in their pure state more effectively, the artificially created Oct4 was also more effective at reprogramming adult cells into so-called induced Pluripotent Stem cells, which have many of the same traits and characteristics as embryonic stem cells but can derived from the patients to both help study degenerative disease and eventually treat them.."

Oct4 is a so-called transcription factor ? a protein that binds to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the flow (or transcription) of genetic information from DNA to mRNA. The synthetic version of Oct4 was created by using recombinant DNA technology whereby a gene was modified to produce new and more active protein. The modified gene was either introduced into stem cells or used to reprogram adult skin cells.

If scientists can exploit this programming of stem cell programs, it will improve the ability to generate stem cells directly from a patient. These cells could in turn potentially be used for individualised studies and for developing individualized therapies for degenerative diseases such as type 1 diabetes and neuro-degenerative diseases.

###

The paper "Transcriptional Activation by Oct4 Is Sufficient for the Maintenance and Induction of Pluripotency", is published in Cell Reports on February 16, 2012, 12:00 EST US time/18:00 Danish time/17:00 UK time. The study involved mouse embryonic stem cells, early embryonic progenitors cells in frogs as well as iPS cells from both mouse and human sources. The research was supported by grants from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (DK), the Medical Reseach Council and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (MRC and BBSRC, UK).

Contact: Tara Womersley, Press and PR Officer, University of Edinburgh, 44-131-650-9836 or 44-7791-355-804

Link to Cell Report: http://cellreports.cell.com/

Embargo: Until February 16 at 12:00 EST US time/18:00 Danish time/17:00 UK time

About DanStem

The Danish Stem Cell Center opened in the Summer 2011 as a hub for international basic, translational and early clinical stem cell research. Professor Brickman and his group joined DanStem in October 2011 to partake in the build-up the center.

DanStem address basic questions in stem cell and developmental biology, and develop novel stem cell based therapeutic approaches for diabetes and cancer. It is supported by two major grants from Novo Nordisk Foundation (DKK 350 million (? 47 million)) and the Danish Research Council for Strategic Research (DKK 64.8 million (? 8,7 million)), respectively. More information about DanStem at: http://danstem.ku.dk

About Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine

The MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM) is a world leading research centre based at the University of Edinburgh. Together we study stem cells, disease and tissue repair to advance human health. Our research is aimed at developing new treatments for major diseases including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, degenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, and liver failure. http://www.crm.ed.ac.uk


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Synthetic protein amplifies genes needed for stem cells

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Cytomedix to Showcase Aldagen's Promising Autologous Cell Therapy Technology at Two Regenerative Medicine Meetings

GAITHERSBURG, MD--(Marketwire -02/16/12)- Cytomedix, Inc. (OTC.BB: CMXI.OB - News) (the "Company"), a leading developer of biologically active regenerative therapies for wound care, inflammation and angiogenesis, today announced that Chief Operating Officer Edward L. Field will present a clinical overview of Aldagen's autologous cell therapy technology at two upcoming meetings: The Cell Society's 2nd Annual Clinical Meeting being held February 17-18 at the Coronado Marriott Resort in San Diego; and the 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit being held on February 21 at Bridgewaters New York in New York City.

Mr. Field will present during the session, "Commercialization Opportunities with Adult Stem Cell Therapies," on Friday, February 17 from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Pacific time at the Cell Society meeting.

Cell Society International is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the clinical application of adult stem cell therapies worldwide. Cell Society's 2nd Annual Clinical Meeting will continue in the tradition established at the 1st Annual Meeting and will offer a unique opportunity for multidisciplinary, international clinical collaboration designed to enhance understanding and thought-provoking insight into treatments and cures for disease and agonizing medical conditions. This year's clinical focus will center on therapies particularly relevant to cardiology, neurology, and orthopedic and plastic surgery.

At the Stem Cell Summit, Mr. Field will present at 2:35 p.m. Eastern time. This meeting showcases more than 30 of the world's leaders in this rapidly evolving industry. The New York Stem Cell Summit brings the future of this dynamic industry to life for investors, industry, practitioners and analysts so they can learn about the investment opportunities in the stem cell marketplace, groundbreaking stem cell products that physicians use today and the growing market potential in terms of revenues.

About Cytomedix, Inc.

Cytomedix, Inc. develops, sells and licenses regenerative biological therapies primarily for wound care, inflammation and angiogenesis. The Company markets the AutoloGel™ System, a device for the production of autologous platelet rich plasma ("PRP") gel for use on a variety of exuding wounds; the Angel® Whole Blood Separation System, a blood processing device and disposable products used for the separation of whole blood into red cells, platelet poor plasma ("PPP") and PRP in surgical settings; and the activAT® Autologous Thrombin Processing Kit, which produces autologous thrombin serum from PPP. The activAT® kit is sold exclusively in Europe and Canada, where it provides a completely autologous, safe alternative to bovine-derived products. On February 8, 2012 Cytomedix announced the acquisition of Aldagen, a biopharmaceutical company developing regenerative cell therapies based on its proprietary ALDH bright cell ("ALDHbr") technology, currently in a Phase 2 trial for the treatment of ischemic stroke. For additional information please visit http://www.cytomedix.com

Safe Harbor Statement
Statements contained in this communication not relating to historical facts are forward-looking statements that are intended to fall within the safe harbor rule for such statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The information contained in the forward-looking statements is inherently uncertain, and Cytomedix' actual results may differ materially due to a number of factors, many of which are beyond Cytomedix' ability to predict or control, including many among others, risks and uncertainties related to the Company's ability to successfully integrate this acquisition, to successfully manage contemplated clinical trials, to manage and address the capital needs, human resource, management, compliance and other challenges of a larger, more complex and intergrated business enterprise, viability and effectiveness of the Company's sales approach and overall marketing strategies, commercial success or acceptance by the medical community, competitive responses, the Company's ability to raise additional capital and to continue as a going concern, and Cytomedix's ability to execute on its strategy to market the AutoloGel™ System as contemplated. To the extent that any statements made here are not historical, these statements are essentially forward-looking. The Company uses words and phrases such as "believes," "forecasted," "projects," "is expected," "remain confident," "will" and/or similar expressions to identify forward-looking statements in this press release. Undue reliance should not be placed on forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual events to differ from the forward-looking statements. More information about some of these risks and uncertainties may be found in the reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Cytomedix, Inc. Cytomedix operates in a highly competitive and rapidly changing business and regulatory environment, thus new or unforeseen risks may arise. Accordingly, investors should not place any reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results. Except as is expressly required by the federal securities laws, Cytomedix undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, changed circumstances or future events or for any other reason. Additional risks that could affect our future operating results are more fully described in our U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including our Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2010, filed with the SEC and other subsequent filings. These filings are available at http://www.sec.gov.

Originally posted here:
Cytomedix to Showcase Aldagen's Promising Autologous Cell Therapy Technology at Two Regenerative Medicine Meetings

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Pathfinder to Present at New York Stem Cell Summit

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Feb. 16, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Pathfinder Cell Therapy, Inc. ("Pathfinder," or "the Company") (OTCQB:PFND.PK - News), a biotechnology company focused on the treatment of diseases characterized by organ-specific cell damage, today announced that Richard L. Franklin, M.D., Ph.D., Founder, CEO and President of Pathfinder, will present at the 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit being held on Tuesday, February 21, 2012.

Event: 7th Annual New York Stem Cell Summit
Date: Tuesday, February 21, 2012
Place: Bridgewaters New York, 11 Fulton Street, New York, NY
Time: 3:35 pm ET

Dr. Franklin will be providing an overview of the Company's novel Pathfinder Cell therapy.

The New York Stem Cell Summit brings together stem cell company executives, researchers, investors and physicians to explore investment opportunities in stem cell research and innovation. More information can be found at http://www.stemcellsummit.com.

About Pathfinder

Pathfinder is developing a novel cell-based therapy and has generated encouraging preclinical data in models of diabetes, renal disease, myocardial infarction, and critical limb ischemia, a severe form of peripheral vascular disease. Leveraging its internal discovery of Pathfinder Cells ("PCs") Pathfinder is pioneering a new field in regenerative medicine.

PCs are a newly identified mammalian cell type present in very low quantities in a variety of organs, including the kidney, liver, pancreas, lymph nodes, myometrium, bone marrow and blood. Early studies indicate that PCs stimulate regeneration of damaged tissues without the cells themselves being incorporated into the newly generated tissue. Based on testing to date, the cells appear to be "immune privileged," and their effects appear to be independent of the tissue source of PCs. For more information please visit: http://www.pathfindercelltherapy.com.

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

This press release contains forward-looking statements. You should be aware that our actual results could differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements, which are based on management's current expectations and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, our inability to obtain additional required financing; costs and delays in the development and/or FDA approval, or the failure to obtain such approval, of our product candidates; uncertainties or differences in interpretation in clinical trial results, if any; our inability to maintain or enter into, and the risks resulting from our dependence upon, collaboration or contractual arrangements necessary for the development, manufacture, commercialization, marketing, sales and distribution of any products; competitive factors; our inability to protect our patents or proprietary rights and obtain necessary rights to third party patents and intellectual property to operate our business; our inability to operate our business without infringing the patents and proprietary rights of others; general economic conditions; the failure of any products to gain market acceptance; technological changes; and government regulation. We do not intend to update any of these factors or to publicly announce the results of any revisions to these forward-looking statements.

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Pathfinder to Present at New York Stem Cell Summit

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Bluebird bio names Genzyme’s Davidson as chief medical officer

Thursday, February 16, 2012

By Rodney Brown

Bluebird bio, a Cambridge gene-therapy company, has named Genzyme veteran Dr. David M. Davidson as the company’s new chief medical officer, according to a release.

Most recently, Davidson was the medical leader for Genzyme Corp.’s gene therapy and Pompe disease enzyme replacement therapy programs, and held the title of senior medical director. He has also worked on a number of commercial products, including Fabrazyme and Myozyme/Lumizyme, and was integral in crafting the new drug application that resulted in the approval of Welchol, the release noted.

Prior to Genzyme, Davidson was a medical director at GelTex Pharmaceuticals. Previously, he completed clinical and research fellowships in infectious diseases at the Harvard Longwood Combined Infectious Diseases Program.

Davidson holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University and an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. In addition, he completed an internal medicine internship, residency training and an endocrinology research fellowship at the University of Chicago Hospitals.

Nick Leschly, CEO of bluebird bio, said in a statement that Davidson’s “deep gene therapy and translational medicine experience will help guide bluebird bio’s clinical development efforts and regulatory strategies.”

Last April, bluebird bio took in $15 million from its announced $30 million financing round, and amended a previous financing. The company was previously known as Genetix Pharmaceuticals Inc.

One month prior, bluebird bio entered into a deal, worth up to $4.2 million, with the French Muscular Dystrophy Association, focused on the development of LentiGlobin, a treatment intended for beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

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Bluebird bio names Genzyme’s Davidson as chief medical officer

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Texas Instruments' research advancements build upon leadership in low power, energy efficiency and greener designs to …

DALLAS, Feb. 16, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Next week at the prestigious International Solid State Technology Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco, Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) (NASDAQ: TXN - News) is presenting several papers and participating in presentations to outline accomplishments and opportunities in areas of low power, energy management and improved energy efficiency.

"Across our innovative semiconductor product portfolio, TI is solving challenges related to low power and energy efficiency," said Gene Frantz, Principal Fellow at TI and creator of "Gene's Law" which states the power efficiency of integrated circuits (ICs) doubles every 18 months. "Applications like cloud computing, medical and consumer electronics will continue to require creative solutions for energy conversion, improved signal path functionality and energy transmission. At ISSCC, many of TI's brightest minds will outline ways the company is addressing these issues."

TI has driven advancements in low power for more than 20 years, starting with the company's early focus on battery life requirements for calculators, and continuing today based on demand for low power, energy efficient solutions for advanced smartphones and many other devices.

TI is transforming power through energy management innovation in areas such as energy generation, conversion, distribution and control of energy demand and resources. The company's dedicated energy lab is the focal point for intelligent energy conversion and management systems for accessible and cost-effective power delivery.

Projects in the labs have evaluated energy harvesting technology and energy conversion from solar to electricity, as well as bringing in new semiconductor materials technologies to achieve higher power densities, voltages and efficiency levels that will be needed in the future. Other research and development teams throughout TI's businesses also contribute to TI's commitment to meet customer needs. TI's work includes partnerships with universities and consortia to explore and incubate new ideas.   

TI's ISSCC papers or presentations on low power and energy efficiency advancements include:   

Sunday, 2/19: Session F2 at 4:35 p.m. – Dave Freeman, TI Fellow, will present how voltage regulator circuits and energy management supports sustainability for solid state circuit supported markets, using "the Cloud" as the example. As the Cloud grows, and businesses and consumers become more dependent upon it, power needs will limit sustainability. Dave will discuss the role of power and energy management in three power domains as the keys toward sustainable Cloud growth. Monday, 2/20: Session 5.8 at 4:45 p.m. – TI's Karthik Kardivel will present a 330 nanoamp (nA) energy harvesting charger with battery management for solar and thermoelectric electric energy harvesting.  The charger and battery management IC, called the bq25504, is designed to extract and store energy in rechargeable batteries or super capacitors for use in personal electronics. Tuesday, 2/21: Session 8.7 at 11:45 a.m. – TI's Venkatesh Srinivasan will describe a wide bandwidth and power-efficient continuous time (CT) sigma delta analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for signal chain applications, including communications or ultrasonic imaging systems. It is the highest clocked CT ADC published to date, running at 6 gigahertz (GHz) with a very competitive area and power for bandwidth and dynamic range.  Tuesday, 2/21: Session 12.7 at 4:45 p.m. – Mahesh Mehendale, TI Fellow, will present a multi-standard, programmable, low-power, full HD video codec engine, used in TI's OMAP4 and OMAP5 system-on-chip (SoC) processors for mobile devices. This engine delivers the highest video quality and lower bit rate output, while offering the most extensive support for video codecs and profiles. Because its capabilities are integrated as part of the SoC, greater efficiencies are achieved over alternative approaches that run capabilities on a separate software programmable processor.  Tuesday, 2/21: Evening Panel at 8:00 p.m. – Ajith Amerasekera, TI Fellow and director of Kilby Labs, will participate in a panel discussion titled, "What is the next RF frontier." Discussions will include trends in low power RF and technology direction to improve applications such as home automation and lighting, smart metering, alarm and security and more. Thursday, 2/23: Session F5 at 9:40 a.m. – In an invited talk, Gene Frantz will address electronic system challenges for healthcare and advancements in low power and energy efficiency that will continue to transform healthcare and deliver a healthcare revolution. 

 

For more information about TI's focus in energy management and efficiency:

 

About innovation at TI
Innovation is the technology thread that runs throughout TI's 80+ year history. Today, TI is driving game-changing technology roadmaps and products in the areas of ultra-low power processing and signal conditioning, energy management, cloud computing, safety and security, medical and more. In collaboration with our customers, industry consortia and universities, TI develops differentiated products that improve how we live, work and play, today and well into the future. Learn more at http://www.ti.com/innovation.

About TI
Texas Instruments semiconductor innovations help 90,000 customers unlock the possibilities of the world as it could be – smarter, safer, greener, healthier and more fun. Our commitment to building a better future is ingrained in everything we do – from the responsible manufacturing of our semiconductors, to caring for our employees, to giving back inside our communities. This is just the beginning of our story. Learn more at http://www.ti.com.

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Texas Instruments' research advancements build upon leadership in low power, energy efficiency and greener designs to ...

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

When is a gene not a gene?

Public release date: 16-Feb-2012
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Contact: Don Powell
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-96928
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

A high-quality reference catalogue of the genetic changes that result in the deactivation of human genes has been developed by a team of researchers. This catalogue of loss-of-function (LoF) variants is needed to find new disease-causing mutations and will help us to better understand the normal function of human genes. In addition, the researchers report that each of us is carrying around 20 genes that have been completely inactivated.

The team refined previous estimations of possible LoF variants by excluding more than half. They accomplished this by identifying errors and real variants that did not seem to affect gene function and eliminating them from the list. They also developed a method of determining whether or not a newly-identified variant could be a likely cause of disease.

Loss of function variants are genetic changes that are predicted to severely disrupt the function of genes. They are known to cause severe human diseases such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Previous genome sequencing projects have suggested that hundreds of these variants are present in the DNA of even perfectly healthy individuals, but could not tell exactly how many.

"The key questions we focused on for this study were: how many of these LoF variants were real and how large a role might they play in human disease?" explains Dr Daniel MacArthur, first author from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "We looked at nearly 3000 putative LoF variants in the genomes of 185 people from Europe, East Asia and West Africa who were participants of the 1000 Genomes Project."

Working as part of the 1000 Genomes Project, the team developed a series of filters to identify common errors. The filters revealed that 56% of the 3000 LoFs were unlikely to seriously affect gene function. But of the true LoF variants, 100 are typically found in the genome of each European and 20 affect both copies of the gene, and are thus predicted to result in complete loss of gene function.

"We identified 253 genes that can be completely inactivated in one or more participant. This shows that at least 1% of human genes can be shut down without causing serious disease", explains Professor Mark Gerstein, co-author from Yale University. "We were able to use the differences between such "LoF-tolerant" genes and known human disease genes to develop a way of predicting whether or not a newly-discovered change in a gene is likely to be severely disease-causing."

The team found some of these LoFs are quite common and are unlikely to have a significant effect on health. For instance, some can affect the way in which we detect smells or how sensitive we are to sour taste. However, they found that the majority of the LoF variants are rare, with half of them being seen only once in the 185 people. This suggests that most of these variants can be quite harmful.

"Our research will be beneficial for current DNA sequencing studies underway in disease patients," says Dr Chris Tyler-Smith, lead author from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "In addition, we provide a list of over 1000 loss-of-function variants, and in most cases little or nothing is known about how these genes work or what they do. By studying the people carrying them in detail, we should get new insights into the function of many poorly-known human genes"

The team's long term goal is to study the potential effects all LoF variants have on humans. They will do this by looking at them in people with different diseases, as well as healthy people who have been measured for many different traits.

###

Notes to Editors

Publication Details
McArthur et al 'A Systematic Survey of Loss-of-Function Variants in Human Protein-Coding Genes'
Published in Science on 17 February

Funding

Supported by Wellcome Trust, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Louis Jeantet Foundation, and the NIH?National Institute of Mental the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, National Basic Research Program of China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Chinese 863 program, the Shenzhen Municipal Government of China.

Participating Centres

List of participating centres found in paper

Selected Websites

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of the world's leading genome centres. Through its ability to conduct research at scale, it is able to engage in bold and long-term exploratory projects that are designed to influence and empower medical science globally. Institute research findings, generated through its own research programmes and through its leading role in international consortia, are being used to develop new diagnostics and treatments for human disease. http://www.sanger.ac.uk

The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable foundation dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health. We support the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical humanities. Our breadth of support includes public engagement, education and the application of research to improve health. We are independent of both political and commercial interests. http://www.wellcome.ac.uk

Contact details

Don Powell Media Manager
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK
Tel 44-1223-496-928
Mobile 44-7753-7753-97
Email press.office@sanger.ac.uk


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When is a gene not a gene?

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Bioline Introduces New SensiFAST™ HRM Kit for Gene Mutations and SNP Analysis

CINCINNATI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Bioline, The PCR Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Meridian Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ:VIVO - News), is proud to announce the latest addition to its SensiFAST family real-time PCR products.

SensiFAST HRM Kit facilitates High Resolution Melt (HRM) curve analysis, enabling amplification and discrimination of even the most challenging sequence differences (such as class 4 SNPs) without sequence preference. SensiFAST HRM is designed to deliver fast, accurate detection of gene mutations and SNPs and provides reliable and highly reproducible data on all commonly used real-time PCR instruments, especially the new generation of fast-cyclers. Since SensiFAST HRM does not require expensive labeled oligonucleotide probes, it is a cost-effective alternative to traditional probe based genotyping methods.

Marco Calzavara, President of Bioline commented, "I am delighted to announce the release of SensiFAST HRM as a new member of our real-time PCR-based SensiFAST family. This new kit will enable researchers to cost-effectively scan DNA from a variety of biological sample types to detect the smallest genetic variations among samples.”

Richard L. Eberly, Chief Commercial Officer of Meridian Bioscience, Inc., stated, “The release of SensiFAST HRM Kit is part of a new generation of products to advance the rapidly expanding portfolio of highly specialized molecular biology reagents from Bioline. We remain committed to our life science customers to bring innovation and quality products to the research lab, clinical diagnostic laboratories, and biotechnology companies.”

ABOUT MERIDIAN BIOSCIENCE, INC.

Meridian is a fully integrated life science company that manufactures, markets and distributes a broad range of innovative diagnostic test kits, purified reagents and related products and offers biopharmaceutical enabling technologies. Utilizing a variety of methods, these products and diagnostic tests provide accuracy, simplicity and speed in the early diagnosis and treatment of common medical conditions, such as gastrointestinal, viral and respiratory infections. Meridian’s diagnostic products are used outside of the human body and require little or no special equipment. The Company's products are designed to enhance patient well-being while reducing the total outcome costs of healthcare. Meridian has strong market positions in the areas of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections, serology, parasitology and fungal disease diagnosis. In addition, Meridian is a supplier of rare reagents, specialty biologicals and related technologies used by biopharmaceutical companies engaged in research for new drugs and vaccines. The Company markets its products and technologies to hospitals, reference laboratories, research centers, veterinary testing centers, diagnostics manufacturers and biotech companies in more than 60 countries around the world. The Company’s shares are traded through NASDAQ’s Global Select Market, symbol VIVO. Meridian's website address is http://www.meridianbioscience.com.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For more information about Bioline, please visit http://www.bioline.com
For more information about Meridian Life Science, Inc., please visit http://www.meridianlifescience.com
For more information about Meridian Bioscience, Inc., please visit http://www.meridianbioscience.com

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Bioline Introduces New SensiFAST™ HRM Kit for Gene Mutations and SNP Analysis

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Sergey Brin's Wife Is Hiring A Marketing Team For Her Gene Startup

Anne Wojcicki, aka Sergey Brin's wife, told us in an interview she is gathering a marketing team for her gene startup.

23andMe asks people to send in spit samples in a tube to build a crowdsourced gene database.

The company has not had a marketing campaign to increase enrollment in the past because genetic testing can be “kind of controversial,” Wojcicki explained, adding that the company "is better established now and people are more comfortable with the idea of testing their DNA.”

In December, 23andme launched its first holiday twitter campaign advertising 23 reasons why genetics testing gift would make a good buy. Besides looking for a marketing team, the company has snagged geneticscreening.com domain, which now redirects to 23andMe.com, for $2200.

23andme hopes to partner with more pharmaceutical companies in the future on phase I and phase II trials, which could lead to actual profit. Before then 23andme needs to bulk up its DNA database. As of October, the company has officially had 125,000 subscribers (including Rupert Murdoch!).

The company leverages its database containing the results of all the DNA tests to collaborate with pharmaceutical companies on number of research projects focusing on Sarcoma, Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and Alzheimer’s.

Wojcicki, who worked on Wall Street for 10 years and has a background in healthcare investing focused primarily on biotechnological companies, says that the current health care system is "not monetizing staying healthy." Hence, in 2006, Linda Avey and Wojcicki founded 23andMe to get individuals to share information and data about themselves and help initiate preventative measures.

Wojcicki might have had another motivation as well, considering that her mother in law, Sergey Brin's mom, was previously diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. The condition is one of the main areas of focus for 23andMe and in October of last year, the company announced that it has identified a gene that could reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease.

Since 2006, the company has managed to raise $68 million in funds, according to Catherine Afarian, 23andMe's spokesperson. In future, the company will look for strategic investors who will need to bring more to the table besides just funds. Past investors include New Enterprise Associates, The Roche Venture Fund, Esther Dyson and Google Ventures. New investors to join in the Series C financing, which was handled internally and raised $31 million, were MPM Capital and Johnson & Johnson Development Corporation.

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Health games emerge as important new therapeutic tools for physical and mental health and well-being

Public release date: 16-Feb-2012
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Contact: Cathia Falvey
cfalvey@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100 x2165
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

New Rochelle, NY -- Millions of dollars and immeasurable hours of research and development are being invested to develop and employ increasingly sophisticated hardware and software technologies to deliver innovative new personalized health care interventions. Digital games are rapidly becoming an important tool for improving lifestyle habits, behavior modification, self-management of illness and chronic conditions, and motivating and supporting physical activity, according to a provocative Expert Panel Discussion in the premier issue of Games for Health Journal, a new bimonthly peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers (http://www.liebertpub.com). The premier issue is available free online at http://www.liebertpub.com/g4h.

The Journal will be the only source for a broad range of hard-to-find and timely information related to health games. For example, the first issue offers a unique Roundtable Discussion, "Health Games Come of Age," an insightful conversation with leaders in the games for health field. Tom Baranowski, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine; Peter Bingham, MD, University of Vermont; Debra Lieberman, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara; Ernie Medina, DrPH, Medplay Technologies; Jesse Schell, MS, Carnegie Mellon University; and Sam K. Yohannon, PT, MS, Cornell University Medical Center share their unique approaches and the creative evidenced-based outcomes research that has brought health games to the forefront of innovative patient care.

The Journal breaks new ground as the first to address this emerging and increasingly important area of health care and will provide a bimonthly forum in print and online for academic and clinical researchers, game designers and developers, health care providers, insurers, and information technology leaders. Articles in the Journal explore the use of game technology in a wide variety of clinical applications in disease prevention, promotion, and monitoring, including nutrition, weight management, medication adherence, diabetes monitoring, post-traumatic stress disorder, Alzheimer's, and cognitive, mental, emotional, and behavioral health.

The Journal is under the leadership of Bill Ferguson, PhD and a distinguished editorial board (http://www.liebertpub.com/editorialboard/games-for-health-journal/588/) including leaders from academia, health care, information technology, and government.

Other key contributions in this issue include an original article on "Use of Nintendo? Wii? During Physical Therapy of an Adult with Lower Extremity Burns" describing a fascinating intervention using health games to accelerate returning severe burn victims to independent living. "The United Health Group's Rx for Longer, Healthier Lives" is an informative program profile that examines the huge health provider's commitment to encouraging and enabling healthier lifestyles through games. Their goal is greater availability and lower cost of health care for people who actively manage their own health and well-being

A clinical brief on "Evaluating Efficacy and Validating Games for Health" suggests the importance and process for objectively assessing the results of games used to improve patients' health. A fascinating interview with Ben Sawyer, Co-Founder of Digitalmill?"Games? Seriously!"--explores the driving forces in the field and the gamification of health.

"The growing breadth and depth of research in health games will have powerful impacts on all stages of life, from infants with autism to geriatric patients wanting to extend their active lives," says Editor-in-Chief Bill Ferguson. "These advancements will impact the nature and availability of preventive and remedial care from physicians to therapists to self-management. The Journal will be a powerful voice for the researchers and clinicians, as well as a resource for state-of-the-art developments for everyone concerned with human well-being."

###

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (http://www.liebertpub.com) is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking and Telemedicine & e-Health. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 70 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at http://www.liebertpub.com.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
140 Huguenot Street, 3rd Floor
New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215, USA


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Health games emerge as important new therapeutic tools for physical and mental health and well-being

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The Splice of Life: Proteins Cooperate to Regulate Gene Splicing

Newswise — Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the genetic splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease – much like editing film can change a movie scene. Abnormal variations in splicing are often implicated in cancer and genetic neurodegenerative disorders.

In a step toward deciphering the “splicing code” of the human genome, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have comprehensively analyzed six of the more highly expressed RNA binding proteins collectively known as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) proteins.

This study, published online Feb 16 in Cell Press’ new open-access journal Cell Reports, describes how multiple RNA binding proteins cooperatively control the diversity of proteins in human cells by regulating the alternative splicing of thousands of genes.

In the splicing process, fragments that do not typically code for protein, called introns, are removed from gene transcripts, and the remaining sequences, called exons, are reconnected. The proteins that bind to RNA are important for the control of the splicing process, and the location where they bind dictates which pieces of the RNA are included or excluded in the final gene transcript -- in much the same fashion that removing and inserting scenes, or splicing, can alter the plot of a movie.

“By integrating vast amounts of information about these key binding proteins, and making this data widely available, we hope to provide a foundation for building predictive models for splicing and future studies in other cell types such as embryonic stem cells,” said principal investigator Gene Yeo, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Institute for Genomic Medicine at UC San Diego, and a visiting professor at the Molecular Engineering Laboratory in Singapore. “If we can understand how these proteins work together and affect one another to regulate alternative splicing, it may offer important clues for rational drug design.”

The data sets highlighted in this study – derived from genome-wide methods including custom-designed splicing-sensitive microarrays, RNA sequencing and high-throughput sequencing to identify genome-wide binding sites (CLIP-seq) -- map the functional binding sites for six of the major hnRNP proteins in human cells.

“We identified thousands of binding sites and altered splicing events for these hnRNP proteins and discovered that, surprisingly these proteins bind and regulate each other and a whole network of other RNA binding proteins, suggesting that these proteins are important for the homeostasis of the cell,” said first author, NSF fellow Stephanie C. Huelga.

According to the UCSD researchers, the genes specifically targeted by the RNA binding proteins in this study are also often implicated in cancer. Yeo added that of the thousands of genomic mutations that appear in cancer, a vast majority occur in the introns that are removed during splicing; however, intronic regions are where regulatory hnRNP proteins often bind.

“Our findings show an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells. The orchestration of RNA binding proteins is not only important for the homeostasis of the cell, but – by mapping the location of binding sites and all the regulatory places in a gene – this study could reveal how disruption of the process leads to disease and, perhaps, a way to intervene.”

Additional contributors to the study include Anthony Q. Vu, Justin D. Arnold, Tiffany Y. Liang, Patrick P. Liu and Bernice Y. Yan, UCSD Cellular and Molecular Medicine; John Paul Donohue, Lily Shiue and Manuel Ares, Jr., UC Santa Cruz; Shawn Hoon and Sydney Brenner, A*STAR, Singapore.

The study was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the UC San Diego Stem Cell Research Program.

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The Splice of Life: Proteins Cooperate to Regulate Gene Splicing

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Mass Gen Begins Study on Depression Treatment Response Using Genetic Biomarker Data

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Massachusetts General Hospital is starting a major study aimed at guiding treatment of patients suffering from treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

The study, which is using genetic biomarker data to compare standard treatment with assay-guided treatment in inpatient adults with treatment-resistant depression, will use Genomind's Genecept Assay. The technology combines a proprietary panel of genetic tests with an analytical report to clinicians.

The primary objective of the study is to improve depressive symptoms from baseline to six months, Genomind said. Other goals are to change clinician behavior and reduce costs.

Researchers will focus on pharmacogenetic genotyping of metabolic activity, which can then be used to guide treatment of patients with antidepressants. Also, genome-wide association study analysis will be performed in the future to identify biomarkers that may be predictive of patient response to and tolerance of certain therapeutics.

Recruitment of patients begins immediately.

Based in Chalfont, Penn., Genomind specializes in neuropsychiatric personalized medicine using genetic information.

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Mass Gen Begins Study on Depression Treatment Response Using Genetic Biomarker Data

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bluebird bio Appoints David Davidson, M.D., as Chief Medical Officer

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

bluebird bio, a world leader in the development of innovative gene therapies for severe genetic disorders, today announced the appointment of David M. Davidson, M.D., to the role of chief medical officer.

“David brings a wealth of gene therapy, rare disease and clinical drug development expertise to bluebird bio during an exciting time in our company’s growth,” said Nick Leschly, chief executive officer of bluebird bio. “Operationally, David’s deep gene therapy and translational medicine experience will help guide bluebird bio’s clinical development efforts and regulatory strategies. With the addition of David to our team, we are well positioned to maximize the high priority opportunities available to us through our broad product platform.”

Prior to joining bluebird bio, Dr. Davidson served as a senior medical director at Genzyme Corporation where he led clinical research for programs in Phases 1 through 4 across a wide range of therapeutic areas for more than a decade. Most recently, Dr. Davidson was the medical leader for Genzyme’s gene therapy and Pompe disease enzyme replacement therapy programs. In addition to Dr. Davidson’s translational medicine experience, he has also worked on a number of commercial products, including Fabrazyme® and Myozyme®/Lumizyme®, and was integral in crafting the new drug application that resulted in the approval of Welchol®. Prior to Genzyme, Dr. Davidson was a medical director at GelTex Pharmaceuticals. Previously, he completed clinical and research fellowships in infectious diseases at the Harvard Longwood Combined Infectious Diseases Program. Dr. Davidson received a B.A. from Columbia University and his M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. In addition, he completed an internal medicine internship, residency training and an endocrinology research fellowship at the University of Chicago Hospitals.

“bluebird bio’s platform has the potential to be truly transformative,” said Dr. Davidson. “It is rare to be presented with an opportunity to develop a novel, clinically validated platform with promising early proof-of-concept data in two indications that can have such a dramatic effect across a broad set of severe genetic diseases. In the next two years, bluebird looks to have its ALD program well into a Phase 2/3 trial and two other programs nearing completion of Phase 1/2 trials for beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. I look forward to this exciting challenge and the potential to have a fundamental and meaningful impact on patients and their families.”

About bluebird bio

bluebird bio is developing innovative gene therapies for severe genetic disorders. At the heart of bluebird bio’s product creation efforts is its broadly applicable gene therapy platform for the development of novel treatments for diseases with few or no clinical options. The company’s novel approach uses stem cells harvested from the patient’s bone marrow into which a healthy version of the disease causing gene is inserted. bluebird bio’s approach represents a true paradigm shift in the treatment of severe genetic diseases by eliminating the potential complications associated with donor cell transplantation and presenting a one-time potentially transformative therapy. bluebird bio has two later stage clinical products in development for childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD) and beta-thalassemia/sickle cell anemia. Led by a world-class team, bluebird bio is privately held and backed by top-tier life sciences investors, including Third Rock Ventures, TVM Capital, ARCH Venture Partners, Forbion Capital Partners, Easton Capital and Genzyme Ventures. Its operations are located in Cambridge, Mass. and Paris, France. For more information, please visit http://www.bluebirdbio.com.

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bluebird bio Appoints David Davidson, M.D., as Chief Medical Officer

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North Carolina-based genetic resources fuel big scientific progress

Public release date: 16-Feb-2012
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Contact: Ellen de Graffenreid
edegraff@med.unc.edu
919-962-3405
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A series of 15 scientific papers published this week in the journals of the Genetics Society of America (Genetics and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics) put North Carolina at the epicenter of a scientific resource called the Collaborative Cross ? a "library" of genetic diversity that scientists believe can help fast-track important discoveries about genetics and disease into new discoveries, tests, and treatments that impact human health.

Researchers have long been frustrated by promising lab results that hit obstacles on the road to human application. Sometimes this is because research in other living organisms is very limited in terms of what conclusions scientists can safely extrapolate to the human population as a whole. One reason for this problem is that organisms studied in the laboratory lack the genetic diversity of humans.

To overcome this obstacle, scientists have begun to create libraries of genetic material. These libraries ? called Genetic Resource Panels (GRPs) ? enable researchers to look at how genetic variation impacts living systems in a careful and systematic manner ? an approach that they think will help draw more robust conclusions, often more quickly.

The Collaborative Cross, a project aimed at mirroring the diversity of human genetics in the laboratory mouse population, is one such GRP. The Collaborative Cross contains ten times the genetic diversity of a typical laboratory mouse population ? a level equivalent to the natural genetic variation in humans. Furthermore, the genetic diversity is spread out across the genome of the Collaborative Cross, while the limited ancestry of typical laboratory mice means that about half of the genome lacks good data for geneticists. The Collaborative Cross fills in those gaps, and the result for scientists is a fast track to understanding and testing new treatment and prevention approaches for numerous human diseases with an underlying genetic component.

The project is led by Fernando Pardo-Manuel de Villena, PhD, in the UNC Department of Genetics and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Threadgill, PhD, a geneticist at North Carolina State University and UNC Lineberger member, and Gary Churchill, PhD, at The Jackson Laboratory. The mice are housed and 'curated' at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Pardo-Manuel de Villena is the lead author on the paper featured on the cover of Genetics, which provides the first comprehensive description of the mouse genome library, which is being shared with scientists across the country through an online resource called a genome browser.

He says, "It is important that all scientists have free access to this resource, which is a census of every genetic line we have and consolidates the work of researchers in the U.S., Israel and Australia in one central place."

The Collaborative Cross is a resource that is offered free to all scientists. The editors of Genetics and G3 note in an editorial accompanying the papers, "Data sharing is particularly crucial for GRPs like the Collaborative Cross. If some pieces of the puzzle have been taken off the board . . . then the puzzle is unlikely to be completed and the community resource is compromised."

This is a big responsibility, notes Terry Magnuson, PhD, Chair of Genetics at UNC-Chapel Hill and Vice Dean for Research at the UNC School of Medicine. "Just as a museum curator is responsible for the heritage of art in their facility, our colleagues at UNC and N.C. State University are responsible for the heritage of the mice in the Collaborative Cross. As scientists use this resource to find ways to prevent and address the genetic changes that cause disease, findings in laboratory experiments should be much easier to translate to humans."

Norman E. Sharpless, MD, UNC Lineberger's associate director for translational research, is collaborating with Charles Perou, PhD, co-director of the center's breast cancer research program, on studies of breast cancer using the Collaborative Cross. He says, "I expect that the results of this work will help human breast cancer patients. Huge consortia are successfully identifying regions of the genome associated with important human diseases like cancer and diabetes, but there are limitations in working with the human genome. The Collaborative Cross provides the best means to understand why certain genes are linked to certain diseases."

Pardo-Manuel de Villena notes that the Collaborative Cross would not be possible without the efforts of the collaborative cross consortium, a global group of scientists that includes National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, and National Human Genome Research Institute scientist Samir Kelada, PhD, MPH.

###

The collaborative cross consortium includes scientists from the following institutions: Tel Aviv University; Geniad, Ltd., University of Western Australia, and Animal Resources Centre, Australia: Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University; The Jackson Laboratory; National Institutes of Health; Oregon Health and Science University; University of Arizona; University of Colorado Denver; University of Washington; Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hadassah Medical Centers and The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research & University of Veterinary Medicine; Duke University; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Wisconsin-Madison; The Genome Institute at Washington University, St. Louis; and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health; Ellison Medical Foundation; National Science Foundation; Australian Research Council; and the Wellcome Trust. Essential support was provided by the Dean of the UNC School of Medicine; UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University Cancer Research Fund from the state of North Carolina. Tel-Aviv University provided core funding and technical support.

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North Carolina-based genetic resources fuel big scientific progress

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Genetics Inspired Research Prevents Cyber Attacks

IT Pros Guide to Data Protection: Top 5 Tips For Securing Data In The Modern Organization
Ready your organization for more robust data protection measures by first implementing these five steps to improve data security in a business- and cost-effective manner.

E Is for Endpoint: Six Security Strategies for Highly Effective IT Professionals
Security professionals know that effective endpoint protection calls for a layered, defense-in-depth approach. But today's endpoints demand even more. Endpoint security now requires a new way of thinking that goes beyond just battling threats to actually enabling operational improvement. Learn the six steps you need to think different about endpoint security.

The Ponemon Institute 2012 State of the Endpoint
The 2012 State of the Endpoint study, sponsored by Lumension and conducted by Ponemon Institute, determines how effective organizations are in the protection of their endpoints and what they perceive are the biggest obstacles to reducing risk. The study is focused on four topics on the state of endpoint security: risk, productivity, resources and complexity.

The CISOs Guide to Measuring IT Security
Many organizations continue to blindly blaze into new technology territory without fully understanding the inherent IT risks. As a CISO, you must be able to facilitate business productivity without the risk. If you can accurately measure your security posture and communicate in terms of business risk as opposed to bits and bytes, you can effectively gain buy-in from key executives on important security initiatives. Learn the key steps to enhancing your security visibility so that you have a voice at the executive table.

Unruly USB Devices Expose Networks to Malware
It's pretty easy for organizations to get so wrapped up about what goes out on USB drives that they forget to protect against what comes in their environments via USB. And with attacks inflicting increasingly greater damage following uncontrolled connection, it's time that organizations got serious about this threat. The key to USB security is balancing productivity with protection.

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Genetics Inspired Research Prevents Cyber Attacks

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Neurons change shape after gene therapy

The study, published in the international science and medicine journal PLoS One, was led by Winthrop Professor Alan Harvey from UWA's School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, and Associate Professor Jennifer Rodger, NHMRC Research Fellow in Experimental and Regenerative Neurosciences at UWA's School of Animal Biology.  The research was funded primarily by the WA Neurotrauma Research Program.

Professor Harvey said gene therapy was a relatively new strategy that attempted to help injured brain cells survive and regrow.

"Our previous work has shown that when growth-promoting genes are introduced into injured brain cells for long periods of time (up to nine months), the cells' capacity for survival and regeneration is significantly increased," he said.

"We have now shown that these same neurons have also changed shape in response to persistent over-expression of the growth factors.  Importantly, it is not just neurons containing the introduced growth-promoting gene that are affected, but neighbouring "bystander" neurons."

Professor Harvey said neural morphology was very important in determining how a cell communicated with other cells and formed the circuits that allowed the brain to function.

"Any changes in morphology are therefore likely to alter the way neurons receive and transmit information.  These changes may be beneficial but could also interfere with normal brain circuits, reducing the benefits of improved survival and regeneration."

Professor Harvey said the results were significant for those involved in designing gene therapy-based protocols to treat brain and spinal cord injury and degeneration.

"These new results suggest that we may need to be careful about the types of genes we use in neurotherapy and how long we continue the therapy.  While it may be beneficial for these genes to move around and cause changes in other cells, we need to be able to switch them off once the change has taken place."

Provided by University of Western Australia

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Neurons change shape after gene therapy

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