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Normal gene hinders breast cancer chemotherapy

ScienceDaily (June 11, 2012) Presence of normal p53, a tumor suppressor gene, instead of a mutated version, makes breast cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin less effective. The preclinical study led by MD Anderson scientists was published June 11 in the journal Cancer Cell.

The research, which challenges the existing paradigm, is another step closer to personalized cancer medicine for breast cancer.

"It's really important to understand the genetic defects a tumor cell has before we treat it," said lead author Guillermina Lozano, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Genetics. "What we learned here is the complete opposite of what we expected. We thought tumors would respond better to treatment if the p53 gene were normal. But the opposite was true, and for a really interesting reason."

Lozano said the research in mouse models showed that non-mutated p53 halted cell division, initiating a senescence (cell aging) process that allowed cells to survive. These senescent cells produce factors that stimulate adjacent cells to grow, fueling the relapse. Mutant p53 cells do not arrest and proceed through the cell cycle into cell division with broken chromosomes caused by the chemotherapy.

"That's a signal for the cell to die," she said. "It can't go any farther."

P53 status crucial to predicting response

The tumor suppressor p53 is mutated or inactivated in the majority of cancers, and about one-third of breast cancers have mutations in the gene. It has long been thought that normal p53 results in a better chemotherapy response, but the evidence in breast cancer has been conflicting.

According to the National Cancer Institute, about 227,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

In this study, doxorubicin-treated p53 mutant tumor cells did not stop cell proliferation, leading to abnormal mitoses and cell death, whereas tumors with normal p53 arrested, avoiding mitotic catastrophe.

"There are a lot of data out there on responses of women to doxorubicin and other drugs that break DNA," Lozano said. "The response rates were mixed, and we never understood the difference. Now we understand that we need to know the p53 status to predict a response."

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Normal gene hinders breast cancer chemotherapy

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Preclinical Research Shows Normal Gene Hinders Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

Mutated tumor suppressor gene p53 leads to better results

Newswise HOUSTON - Presence of normal p53, a tumor suppressor gene, instead of a mutated version, makes breast cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin less effective. The preclinical study led by MD Anderson scientists was published today in the journal Cancer Cell.

The research, which challenges the existing paradigm, is another step closer to personalized cancer medicine for breast cancer.

"It's really important to understand the genetic defects a tumor cell has before we treat it," said lead author Guillermina Lozano, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Genetics. "What we learned here is the complete opposite of what we expected. We thought tumors would respond better to treatment if the p53 gene were normal. But the opposite was true, and for a really interesting reason."

Lozano said the research in mouse models showed that non-mutated p53 halted cell division, initiating a senescence (cell aging) process that allowed cells to survive. These senescent cells produce factors that stimulate adjacent cells to grow, fueling the relapse. Mutant p53 cells do not arrest and proceed through the cell cycle into cell division with broken chromosomes caused by the chemotherapy.

"That's a signal for the cell to die," she said. "It can't go any farther."

P53 status crucial to predicting response

The tumor suppressor p53 is mutated or inactivated in the majority of cancers, and about one-third of breast cancers have mutations in the gene. It has long been thought that normal p53 results in a better chemotherapy response, but the evidence in breast cancer has been conflicting.

According to the National Cancer Institute, about 227,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

In this study, doxorubicin-treated p53 mutant tumor cells did not stop cell proliferation, leading to abnormal mitoses and cell death, whereas tumors with normal p53 arrested, avoiding mitotic catastrophe.

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Preclinical Research Shows Normal Gene Hinders Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

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Experts on ethics back creation of babies with three parents saying it is 'amazing opportunity' for families blighted …

Critics caution against opening a 'Pandora's box' which could lead to a trend towards 'designer babies'

By Fiona Macrae

PUBLISHED: 19:56 EST, 11 June 2012 | UPDATED: 19:56 EST, 11 June 2012

The creation of babies with three genetic parents would be an amazing opportunity for families whose lives have been blighted by incurable diseases, say an eminent group of experts on ethics in science.

The influential Nuffield Council on Bioethics conceded that while those with religious views might view the advance as an abomination, there is no ethical reason to stop it, provided it is proved to be safe and effective.

The approval comes as pressure builds on the Government to amend the law to allow the genetic engineering of eggs and embryos, creating babies free of devastating genetic diseases.

Three parents? Ethicists have decided that mixing DNA from more than two parents is acceptable if it is used to cure hereditary diseases

The children would effectively have two mothers and one father. Those in favour say it would give couples who have endured the heartbreak of miscarriages and stillbirths, and children who have died while still young, the option of having a healthy family.

But critics say the science is too risky and the safety of the baby should take precedence over a womans desire to be a mother.

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Experts on ethics back creation of babies with three parents saying it is 'amazing opportunity' for families blighted ...

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Scientists Find New Genetic Path to Deadly Diarrheal Disease

Newswise ATHENS, Ohio (June 11, 2012)Scientists have found new genetic information that shows how harmful bacteria cause the acute diarrheal disease shigellosis, which kills more than a million people worldwide each year.

The research, which could lead to the development of future treatments, was published today in the journal PLoS ONE. The study was led by Ohio University scientist Erin Murphy and doctoral student William Broach, with contributions from University of Nevada, Las Vegas and University of Texas at Austin researchers.

When the disease-causing bacterium Shigella invades a human host, environmental conditions there, such as changes in temperature or pH, stimulate a genetic expression pathway within the bacterium that allows it to survive and cause disease. Central to this genetic pathway are two proteins, VirF and VirB. VirF functions to increase production of VirB which, in turn, promotes the production of factors that increases the bacteriums virulence, or ability to cause illness in its host.

Its like a domino effect, said Murphy, assistant professor of bacteriology in the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Murphy and Broachs new study, however, suggests that production of VirB can be controlled independently of VirF. It also shows that the VirF-independent regulation is mediated by a specific small RNA, a special type of molecule whose job is to control the production of particular targets. This is the first study to demonstrate that transcription of virB is regulated by any factor other than VirF, Murphy explained.

The research not only reveals the intricate level of gene expression the bacteria employ to survive in the human body, but potentially could lead to new treatments. Currently, antibiotics are prescribed to patients with the disease.

These findings are feeding into the basic understanding of this gene expression so that future researchers can work to disrupt it, Broach said. The more we know about it, the more targets we have to disrupt it and to possibly develop targeted antibiotic treatments.

For those living in developing countries, where access to clean drinking water can be scarce, an improved medical treatment for shigellosis could mean the difference between life and death.

In the United States, if we get severe diarrhea we can go to the store and get Gatorade, Murphy said. But if you're already starving to begin with because you don't have access to good food and clean water, then you get shigellosis on top of thatand you dont have good water to rehydrate yourselfthats when the deaths happen.

The disease, which is transmitted person to person or through contaminated food or water sources, has an infectious dose of just 10 organisms, meaning as few as 10 organisms can cause disease in a healthy person. This infectious dose is exceedingly low compared to other bacteria that require tens of thousands of organisms to cause disease.

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Prenatal genetic test offers more information, raises questions – Mon, 11 Jun 2012 PST

June 11, 2012 in Health

Deborah L. Shelton Chicago Tribune (MCT)

The latest advance in prenatal genetic testing purports to offer parents more detailed information than ever about the child they are expecting. But for some, the new answers could lead to another round of questions.

The technology allows doctors to detect small or subtle chromosomal changes in a fetus such as missing or extra pieces of DNA that could be missed by standard tests.

Most parents will get results confirming a normal pregnancy. But some will learn that their baby has a birth defect, a developmental problem or other medical condition, and in a small number of cases the test will detect things that no one knows quite how to interpret.

The information can allow parents to prepare for early intervention and treatment, but it also could raise questions about terminating the pregnancy or lead to nagging worry over uncertain results.

The Reproductive Genetics Institute in Chicago, which has helped pioneer the rapidly developing field of prenatal diagnosis and testing, recently began offering the procedure array comparative genomic hybridization, or array CGH for short to any pregnant woman who wants it.

The technology has been available for a number of years but it has almost never been used prenatally, said Dr. Norman Ginsberg, an obstetrician specializing in prenatal genetic testing at the institute. We think this is the beginning of the next generation of how well look at things.

Other medical experts see the technology as promising but have concerns about using it as a first-line test because of the potential drawbacks and the lack of published research. The availability of array CGH also raises fundamental, sometimes delicate, questions for parents.

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How High Can Seattle Genetics Fly?

Shares of Seattle Genetics (Nasdaq: SGEN) hit a 52-week high on Friday. Let's take a look at how it got there and see whether clear skies are still in the forecast.

How it got hereIf you're looking for one particular sector that's largely ignored the recent correction, biotechnology would be it.

Seattle Genetics is one of many cancer-focused biotechs tipping the scales at a new high. But it isn't just Seattle Genetics' drugs that have investors excited; it's the pathway by which they work that has both patients and Wall Street abuzz.

Seattle Genetics is one of a handful of biotechs focused on researching antibody-drug conjugates. These ADC's will have a toxin attached to them that only releases when it comes in contact with a very specific protein. For Seattle Genetics' lead drug, Adcetris, which is used to treat Hodgkin's lymphoma, this protein is CD30. When the ADCs come in contact with this protein, the cancer cell is destroyed with minimal side effects and considerably better efficiency (i.e., healthy cells remain predominantly unaffected).

Another firm that's had success with ADCs is ImmunoGen (Nasdaq: IMGN) , whose targeted antibody payload technology supplies the toxin and linker currently used in Genentech's advanced breast cancer treatment, T-DM1 (owned by Roche), which is currently in late-stage trials.

As always, the biggest concern with a company like Seattle Genetics is whether it can turn these aspirations into actual results. Too often we see drug hopefuls fizzle out as constant innovation in the sector and poor product launches doom a stock. Three years ago, Dendreon's (Nasdaq: DNDN) Provenge treatment was supposed to completely change the way we looked at late-stage prostate cancer and become a blockbuster treatment. Three years later, the treatment's $93,000 price tag and a pitiful product launch have Dendreon losing money hand over fist. At a price tag in excess of $100,000, Adcetris, and any future compounds, risks the same fate.

How it stacks upLet's see how Seattle Genetics stacks up next to its peers.

SGEN data by YCharts

In theory, there are only two companies utilizing ADC drug-combining technology: Seattle Genetics and ImmunoGen. I chose to include Pfizer (NYSE: PFE) here as well because it developed an ADC in 2010 called Mylotarg that it pulled from the market because the toxin would not stay linked to the antibody long enough to hit the target cancer cells.

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How High Can Seattle Genetics Fly?

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Robin Roberts’ breast cancer cure may have caused new illness

The cure that helped Good Morning America co-host Robin Roberts beat breast cancer may have caused the new disease shes battling, experts said Monday.

And before Roberts undergoes a bone marrow transplant to combat MDS, or myelodysplastic syndrome, she will need to subject her already weakend body to even more chemotherapy.

I know it seems counterintuitive, said Dr. Azra Raza, who heads the MDS Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia. But this is the only way we know how to get rid of these damaged cells before we can start treatment.

MDS is a disease of the blood and bone marrow that if left untreated can lead to leukemia and death.

It is a relatively rare condition, said Raza. The are 15,000 cases diagnosed annually every year in the U.S.

Patients who have been exposed to benzene or who have undergone chemotherapy or radiation treatments for cancer are the most susceptible to MDS, said Azra.

Sometimes stem cells are damaged during radiation or chemotherapy, Raza said. MDS is a bad disease to have.

There are different degrees of severity, added Robert Bona, Professor of Medical Sciences at Quinnipiac University. The ones that are most severe are treated with bone marrow transplants, if theyre young enough and a donor can be found.

Bone marrow donors are scarce, especially for African-American women.

Luckily for Roberts, her sister Sally-Ann Roberts, an anchor at a New Orleans TV station, is a match. And the 51-year-old newscasters age and otherwise good physical condition greatly improve her chances of licking this disease, the experts said.

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What is preleukemia or MDS?

istock

"Good Morning America's" Robin Roberts announced this morning that she has myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS. The syndrome is also known as preleukemia.

MDS can be broken down by its name: Myeloid refers to a type of blood cell; dysplasia means a problem with the development of those cells.

The condition occurs when "something goes wrong in your bone marrow -- the spongy material inside your bones where blood cells are made," according to the Mayo Clinic.

A healthy person's bone marrow produces stem cells that mature into blood cells. But the bone marrow of a person with MDS produces abnormal stem cells that turn into defective blood cells.

Deformed cells get into the bloodstream and eventually outnumber healthy blood cells, according to the National Cancer Institute. Often the deformed blood cells don't live as long as they should, producing a shortage in the body.

There are several types of MDS, depending on the kind of myeloid cells - red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets - that are being affected. Having too few red blood cells results in anemia; having too few white blood cells can result in frequent infections.

The term "preleukemia" is a bit misleading, as most MDS cases do not become cancerous. Certain types of MDS can progress to acute myeloid leukemia, however.

MDS can be caused by exposure to chemotherapy and radiation, common cancer treatments. (Roberts is a breast cancer survivor.)

Symptoms are rare during the early stage of the disease, but can include tiredness, shortness of breath and easy bruising/bleeding. Doctors generally diagnose through a blood test and a bone marrow biopsy.

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‘Good Morning America’ co-host Robin Roberts has blood disorder

"Good Morning America" co-host Robin Roberts, who five years ago beat breast cancer, said Monday that she has now been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood disorder caused by chemotherapy for her cancer. She is now taking chemotherapy in preparation for receiving a bone marrow transplant from her sister later this year. Because she is relatively young and healthy, the combination of treatments should cure the condition, doctors have told her.

Myelodysplastic syndrome is sometimes known as pre-leukemia, and many researchers now believe that, if untreated, it will progress to acute myeloid leukemia. It most commonly strikes people between the ages of 58 and 75, but can occur at any age, particularly if the patient has had cancer chemotherapy. It is estimated to affect as many as 50 Americans per 100,000, with about 20,000 new cases each year.

It is a disease of the bone marrow -- the semi-liquid tissue inside bones that produces blood cells. Stem cells in the bone marrow develop into two types of cells, myeloid and lymphoid. Lymphoid cells go on to become white blood cells that fight infections. Myeloid cells develop into three different types of cells: red blood cells, which carry oxygen; platelets, which control bleeding by forming clots; and white blood cells. In myeloplastic syndrome the myeloid cells stop developing; they do not function normally and either die in the bone marrow or soon after they enter the blood. The dysfunctional cells crowd out healthy cells.

Symptoms are often not apparent, but can include shortness of breath, weakness or tiredness, pale skin, easy bruising and bleeding, and fever or frequent infections. The best treatment for the type of disorder Roberts is suffering is to kill all the stem cells with chemotherapy, then replace them with functioning stem cells from a donor -- in this case, her sister. Treatment is usually more effective when the disorder has been caused by chemotherapy.

Roberts announced her condition on the show and on the ABC blog, saying she will continue her job at "Good Morning America" and that "My doctors tell me Im going to beat this and I know its true."

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Michelle Obama & More Celebs Tweet At Robin Roberts After MDS Diagnosis

061112_RobinRobertsABC_ftrGood Morning America host Robin Roberts announced June 11 that she was diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS), a blood disorder affecting the stem cells in the bone marrow. Celebrities and first lady Michelle Obama have already offered their support on Twitter!

Robin Robertshas a special connection to The Obamas: She found out she was interviewingPresident Obama on the very same day she underwent a painful bone marrow extraction. The combination of landing the biggest interview of my career and having a drill in my back reminds me that God only gives us what we can handle and that it helps to have a good sense of humor when we run smack into the absurdity of life, Robin wrote on her blog. And First Lady Michelle Obama was quick to offer her condolences to the GMA host.

.@RobinRoberts, Barack and I have you in our prayers. We believe in you and thank you for bringing awareness and hope to others. mo, Michelletweeted June 11.

Heres what other celebs tweeted about Robin:

prayers for Robin Roberts tweeted hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons.

We all love you & are cheering you on!! tweeted fellow journalist Katie Couric.

I wish my friend@RobinRobertsthe strength, faith & love she will need on this new journey. I send all that and more. tweeted Maria Shriver.

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Michelle Obama & More Celebs Tweet At Robin Roberts After MDS Diagnosis

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Follow-Up Guide To Personalized Medicine Hits All The Right Notes

Verinata Health CEO Caren Mason has resigned but will continue to provide the company with consultative services. Mason joined Verinata in November 2010. She was previously the president and CEO of Quidel, president and CEO of MiraMedica, CEO of eMed Technologies, and general manager of GE Healthcare. The firm plans to recruit a new CEO.

Bruker has named Charles Wagner to be its new executive VP and chief financial officer, beginning at the end of June, Bruker said this week. Current CFO William Knight will continue to serve on the company's management team and will work with Wagner to ensure a smooth transition. Wagner also has stepped down from his positions on Bruker's board of directors and its audit committee, where he has served since 2010.

CLC Bio said this week that it has appointed Richard Lussier as director of business for the Americas region. He has worked in life sciences sales and commercial operations, most recently as VP of worldwide sales at RainDance Technologies. He formerly held leadership positions in sales, service, and support at Solexa, Fluidigm, Applied Biosystems, and Celera Genomics.

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Follow-Up Guide To Personalized Medicine Hits All The Right Notes

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Warburton Strengths of Saban Developmental Biology Regenerative Medicine Dept. – Video

11-06-2012 18:26 Strengths of the Saban Research Institute Developmental Biology/Regenerative Medicine Retreat by: David Warburton OBE, DSc, MD, MMM, FRCP, FRCS, FRCPCH Professor of Pediatrics, Surgery and Craniofacial Biology Director, Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine Program Director, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine Training Program and Shared Laboratory Saban Research Institute Children¹s Hospital Los Angeles Keck School of Medicine and Ostrow School of Dentistry University of Southern California

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Shire’s Advanced BioHealing Commits to Developing Regenerative Medicine Campus in San Diego

SAN DIEGO, June 11, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --

Shire plc, the global specialty biopharmaceutical company, announced today that its Regenerative Medicine business, Advanced BioHealing, Inc., has entered into a lease agreement with BioMed Realty Trust, Inc. which will allow the company to further expand its operational footprint and presence in the San Diego area over the next several years.

The new campus will provide Shire's Regenerative Medicine business the increased capacity it needs to meet future demand for its lead product, DERMAGRAFT, while offering additional space and infrastructure to manufacture new regenerative medicine products, in alignment with the business' strategic growth plan.

"We are committed to investing in and expanding our Regenerative Medicine business and with the signing of this lease, we are pleased to confirm and build our presence in San Diego with BioMed Realty as our real estate partner," said Kevin Rakin, Shire's Regenerative Medicine President. "This new campus will give us the flexibility and increased capacity we need to develop and manufacture new regenerative medicine therapies and build our foundation for continued growth in this exciting field."

Phase I of the site development will be in excess of 150,000 square feet and will house the company's manufacturing and associated support operations, commercial operations, corporate, and administrative functions. This expansion could create several hundred local jobs once the regenerative medicine campus is operational.

"Shire's commitment to growing its Regenerative Medicine business in San Diego is important to a region where one-in-10 people remain unemployed," said Congressman Brian Bilbray (CA-50). "This investment will not only provide additional opportunities for rewarding, high-paying jobs, but will ensure that San Diego remains a leader in the development of innovative patient care."

Shire expects to begin construction of the new campus in Sorrento Mesa in 2013, with initial occupancy targeted for 2014.

"We are pleased to enter into this partnership with Advanced BioHealing, which is the culmination of extensive, collaborative efforts by both companies to identify and execute on a real estate solution which will fully support their development and manufacturing needs," said Alan D. Gold, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BioMed Realty. "We look forward to working closely with the Advanced BioHealing and Shire teams to develop this future multi-phase campus for the development and commercialization of important regenerative medicine therapies."

The company plans to maintain its current DERMAGRAFT manufacturing facility on North Torrey Pines Road in La Jolla, CA, which currently employs nearly 200 people.

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A Better Way to Grow Bone: Fresh, Purified Fat Stem Cells Grow Bone Better, Faster

Newswise UCLA stem cell scientists purified a subset of stem cells found in fat tissue and made from them bone that was formed faster and was of higher quality than bone grown using traditional methods, a finding that may one day eliminate the need for painful bone grafts that use material taken from the patient during invasive procedures.

Adipose, or fat, tissue is thought to be an ideal source of cells called mesenchymal stem cells - capable of developing into bone, cartilage, muscle and other tissues - because they are plentiful and easily attained through procedures such as liposuction, said Dr. Chia Soo, vice chair for research at UCLA Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The co-senior authors on the project, Soo and Bruno Pault, are members of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.

Traditionally, cells taken from fat had to be cultured for weeks to isolate the stem cells which could become bone, and their expansion increases risk of infection and genetic instability. A fresh, non-cultured cell composition called stromal vascular fraction (SVF) also is used to grow bone. However, SVF cells taken from adipose tissue are a highly heterogeneous population that includes cells that arent capable of becoming bone.

Pault and Soos team used a cell sorting machine to isolate and purify human perivascular stem cells (hPSC) from adipose tissue and showed that those cells worked far better than SVF cells in creating bone. They also showed that a growth factor called NELL-1, discovered by Dr. Kang Ting of the UCLA School of Dentistry, enhanced the bone formation in their animal model.

People have shown that culture-derived cells could grow bone, but these are a fresh cell population and we didnt have to go through the culture process, which can take weeks, Soo said. The best bone graft is still your own bone, but that is in limited supply and sometimes not of good quality. What we show here is a faster and better way to create bone that could have clinical applications.

The study appears June 11, 2012 in the early online edition of the peer-reviewed journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, a new journal that seeks to bridge stem cell research and clinical trials.

In the animal model, Soo and Paults team put the hPSCs with NELL-1 in a muscle pouch, a place where bone is not normally grown. They then used X-rays to determine that the cells did indeed become bone.

The purified human hPSCs formed significantly more bone in comparison to the SVF by all parameters, Soo said. And these cells are plentiful enough that patients with not much excess body fat can donate their own fat tissue.

Soo said if everything goes well, patients may one day have rapid access to high quality bone graft material by which doctors get their fat tissue, purify that into hPSCs and replace their own stem cells with NELL-1 back into the area where bone is required. The hPSC with NELL-1 could grow into bone inside the patient, eliminating the need for painful bone graft harvestings. The goal is for the process to isolate the hPSCs and add the NELL-1 with a matrix or scaffold to aid cell adhesion to take less than an hour, Soo said.

Excitingly, recent studies have already demonstrated the utility of perivascular stem cells for regeneration of disparate tissue types, including skeletal muscle, lung and even myocardium, said Pault, a professor of orthopedic surgery Further studies will extend our findings and apply the robust osteogenic potential of hPSCs to the healing of bone defects.

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A Better Way to Grow Bone: Fresh, Purified Fat Stem Cells Grow Bone Better, Faster

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A better way to grow bone: Fresh, purified fat stem cells grow bone faster and better

Public release date: 11-Jun-2012 [ | E-mail | Share ]

Contact: Kim Irwin kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu 310-206-2805 University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

UCLA stem cell scientists purified a subset of stem cells found in fat tissue and made from them bone that was formed faster and was of higher quality than bone grown using traditional methods, a finding that may one day eliminate the need for painful bone grafts that use material taken from the patient during invasive procedures.

Adipose, or fat, tissue is thought to be an ideal source of cells called mesenchymal stem cells - capable of developing into bone, cartilage, muscle and other tissues - because they are plentiful and easily attained through procedures such as liposuction, said Dr. Chia Soo, vice chair for research at UCLA Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The co-senior authors on the project, Soo and Bruno Pault, are members of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.

Traditionally, cells taken from fat had to be cultured for weeks to isolate the stem cells which could become bone, and their expansion increases risk of infection and genetic instability. A fresh, non-cultured cell composition called stromal vascular fraction (SVF) also is used to grow bone. However, SVF cells taken from adipose tissue are a highly heterogeneous population that includes cells that aren't capable of becoming bone.

Pault and Soo's team used a cell sorting machine to isolate and purify human perivascular stem cells (hPSC) from adipose tissue and showed that those cells worked far better than SVF cells in creating bone. They also showed that a growth factor called NELL-1, discovered by Dr. Kang Ting of the UCLA School of Dentistry, enhanced the bone formation in their animal model.

"People have shown that culture-derived cells could grow bone, but these are a fresh cell population and we didn't have to go through the culture process, which can take weeks," Soo said. "The best bone graft is still your own bone, but that is in limited supply and sometimes not of good quality. What we show here is a faster and better way to create bone that could have clinical applications."

The study appears June 11, 2012 in the early online edition of the peer-reviewed journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, a new journal that seeks to bridge stem cell research and clinical trials.

In the animal model, Soo and Pault's team put the hPSCs with NELL-1 in a muscle pouch, a place where bone is not normally grown. They then used X-rays to determine that the cells did indeed become bone.

"The purified human hPSCs formed significantly more bone in comparison to the SVF by all parameters," Soo said. "And these cells are plentiful enough that patients with not much excess body fat can donate their own fat tissue."

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A better way to grow bone: Fresh, purified fat stem cells grow bone faster and better

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Research and Markets: Analysis of the Stem Cell Markets-Unlocking the New Era in Therapeutics

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pqrlwc/analysis_of_the_st) has announced the addition of Frost & Sullivan's new report "Analysis of the Stem Cell Markets-Unlocking the New Era in Therapeutics" to their offering.

This Frost & Sullivan research service titled Analysis of the Stem Cell Markets-Unlocking the New Era in Therapeutics focuses on prospects for the stem cell therapeutics market in Europe and provides valuable recommendations and conclusions for market participants. Market segmentation is based on regulatory framework in Europe relating to research on adult and embryonic stem cells. The main countries discussed are the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, Sweden, Finland, and the remaining parts of Europe.

Market Overview

New Applications in Drug Discovery Platforms to Drive Stem Cells Market

Stem cells offer exciting potential in regenerative medicine, and are likely to be widely used by mid-2017. Pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device companies are showing increased interest in stem cell research. The market will be driven by stem cell applications in drug discovery platforms and by successful academia -commercial company partnership models.

The high attrition rates of potential drug candidates has piqued the interest of pharmaceutical and biotech industries in stem cell use during the drug discovery phase, notes the analyst of this research. Previously, animal cell lines, tumours, or genetic transformation have been the traditional platform for testing drug candidates; however, these abnormal' cells have significantly contributed to a lack of translation into clinical studies. Many academic institutes and research centres are collaborating with biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in stem cell research. This will provide impetus to the emergence of novel cell-based therapies.

Host of Challenges Need to be Confronted before Stem Cell Therapeutics can Realise its Potential

Key challenges to market development relate to reimbursement, ethics and the complexity of clinical trials. Securing reimbursement for stem cell therapeutic products is expected to be critical for commercial success. However, stem cell therapies are likely to be expensive. Insurers, therefore, may be unwilling to pay for the treatment. At the same time, patients are unlikely to be able to afford these treatments. The use of embryonic stem cells raises a host of thorny ethical, legal, and social issues, adds the analyst. As a result, market prices for various products may be affected. Moreover, many research institutes are adopting policies promoting the ethical use of human embryonic tissues. Such policies are hindering the overall research process for several companies working in collaboration with these institutes.

In addition to apprehensions about how many products will actually make it through human-based clinical trials, companies are also worried about which financial model can be applied to stem cell therapies, cautions the analyst. Possibly low return on investment (ROI) is also resulting in pharmaceutical companies adopting a cautious approach to stem cell therapeutics. To push through policy or regulatory reforms, the technology platform and geographical location of stem cell companies should complement the terms laid down in EMEA. The methodology for cell expansion and synchronisation must be optimised to acquire a large population of the desired cell at the right differentiation point, adds the analyst. More research is needed in human pluripotent and multi potent stem cell as it differs from mice to humans. Completion of clinical trials will be essential to ensure the safety and efficacy of the stem cell therapy.

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Research and Markets: Analysis of the Stem Cell Markets-Unlocking the New Era in Therapeutics

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Brown University football player Matt Shannon offers a most precious gift – a bone-marrow donation

Cleveland, Ohio - When Matt Shannon clicked on the Be The Match email last month, he figured it would be another form letter. One of the emails telling him about another bone marrow registration drive, or something complimenting him, again, on becoming a part of the registry with his entire Brown University football team.

But when the Mayfield Heights native read the email, his world stopped for a second.

"You're a match," it said.

Of the 650,000 who register for the Be The Match Registry each year, only about 1 in 40 find a match, someone who is in need of a bone marrow donation and who shares a compatible biological makeup. Of those who are a tentative match, only about 1 in 540 actually donate bone marrow.

On May 31, Shannon became one who not only was found to be a match but one who also donated his bone marrow for a patient in need. The rising junior who is a safety on the Brown football team underwent a two-hour surgical procedure at Georgetown Medical Center in Washington that extracted marrow from his hip bones. He's required to rest for about two weeks post-surgery as his body regenerates the matter removed.

"I'm not going to say it wasn't [painful], but any pain or sacrifice I had to make is nothing compared to what [the match] has to go through," Shannon said.

Shannon registered with Be The Match as a freshman when the football team helped with the registration drive in the spring.

The Brown Bears are part of the "Get in the Game, Save a Life" campaign begun by Villanova football coach Andy Talley 10 years ago to involve student-athletes in the program, and while players aren't required to register, most do.

Shannon's parents, Michelle and Hugh, registered for the Be The Match program years ago, when Michelle was studying to become a nurse. So when Matt told his mom that he was signing up when he was a freshman at Brown, she was happy he was taking a small step to help others in need.

But when Matt received the final call just before finals week at Brown confirming he was a perfect match, and then told his mother he wanted to donate, she was proud of the boy she and her husband have raised.

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Brown University football player Matt Shannon offers a most precious gift - a bone-marrow donation

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Robin Roberts Diagnosed With MDS — Details on Her Disease

061112_RobinRoberts_SG_ftrGood Morning America host Robin Roberts announced on Monday June 11 that she was diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS), a blood disorder affecting the stem cells in the bone marrow. Find out all the details on the disease!

Robin Roberts bravely announced to the world on Monday June 11 that she has been diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, formerly known as preleukemia. The GMA host held back tears as she held her co-hosts hands and revealed her painful secret that shes held for more than a month. MDS is a blood-related condition that involves ineffective production of the myeloid class of blood cells.It is a rare blood disorder that affects the bone marrow, she said.

Left without a transplant, the disease worsens and the patient develops low blood counts due to progressive bone marrow failure. Found mostly in patients between 60 and 75, Robin was diagnosed at the age of 51-years-old leaving her with a good prognosis.

Symptoms can involve severe anemia and require frequent blood transfusions. The mean life-expectancy is 18 to 24 months in mild cases of MDS or even longer when stem cell transplantation is done, but all cases vary.

Robin, who has experienced a series of highs and lows throughout her career, announced that her sister, Sally-Ann Roberts, would be her donor! I am blessed, Robin said because her sister is a virtually perfect bone marrow match. Thankfully,Robins doctors are optimistic of her recovery!My doctors tell me Im going to beat this and I know its true, Robin said.

Success of bone marrow transplantation has been found to correlate with severity of MDS.

Famous patients with MDS include astronomerCarl SaganandwriterRoald Dahl(James and the Giant Peach,Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,) and more.

We wish Robin the best and will be rooting for her throughout her treatments!

HollywoodLifers, do you know someone with MDS? Tell us your story below!

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Robin Roberts Diagnosed With MDS — Details on Her Disease

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Fate Therapeutics And BD Biosciences Launch BD™ SMC4 To Improve Cellular Reprogramming And IPS Cell Culture Applications

SAN DIEGO , June 11, 2012 /CNW/ - Fate Therapeutics, Inc. in collaboration with BD Biosciences, a segment of BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), today announced the introduction of the first induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-related product resulting from the collaboration between the two companies. BD SMC4 is a patent protected, pre-formulated cocktail of small molecules for improving cellular reprogramming efficiencies and for enabling single-cell passaging and flow cytometry sorting of iPSCs in feeder cell-free and other pluripotent cell culture systems.

"iPSCs have the potential to redefine the way medical research is conducted," said Dr. Charles Crespi , Vice President at BD Biosciences. "However, most current reprogramming technologies are inefficient, which slows research efforts. BD SMC4 is an exciting complement to the BD portfolio of stem cell technologies that can accelerate the pace of research, and, ultimately, drug development."

The collaboration between BD Biosciences and Fate Therapeutics seeks to provide life science researchers and the pharmaceutical community reliable access to advanced iPSC tools and technologies. These technologies are for use in human disease research, drug discovery and the manufacture of cell-based therapies. The identification of the small molecule additives, and their use in an industrial platform for iPSC generation and characterization was recently published in the journal, Scientific Reports (Valamehr et al Scientific Reports 2, Article number: 213, 2012).

"Our research focus has uncovered novel technologies to enable the commercial and industrial application of iPS cells," said Dr. Peter Flynn , Vice President of Biologic Therapeutics at Fate Therapeutics. "The BD SMC4 media additive was developed at Fate to enable our scientists to internally perform high-throughput generation, clonal selection, characterization and expansion of pluripotent cells, and we are excited to empower the stem cell research community with these important iPSC technologies through our collaboration with BD."

iPSC technology holds great promise for disease modeling, drug screening and toxicology testing as well as for autologous and allogeneic cell therapy. Building on the foundational work of its scientific founders, Drs. Rudolf Jaenisch and Sheng Ding, Fate Therapeutics is developing a suite of proprietary products and technologies to overcome the remaining technical hurdles for iPS cell integration into the therapeutic development process. Under the three-year collaboration, Fate and BD will co-develop certain stem cell products using Fate's award-winning iPSC technology platform, and BD will commercialize these stem cell products on a worldwide basis. The iPSC product platform of Fate Therapeutics is supported by foundational intellectual property including U.S. Patent No. 8,071,369, entitled "Compositions for Reprogramming Somatic Cells," which claims a composition comprising a somatic cell having an exogenous nucleic acid that encodes an Oct4 protein introduced into the cell.

About Fate Therapeutics, Inc. Fate Therapeutics is an innovative biotechnology company developing novel stem cell modulators (SCMs), biologic or small molecule compounds that guide cell fate, to treat patients with very few therapeutic options. Fate Therapeutics' lead clinical program, ProHema, consists of pharmacologically-enhanced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), designed to improve HSC support during the normal course of a stem cell transplant for the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. The Company is also advancing a robust pipeline of human recombinant proteins, each with novel mechanisms of action, for skeletal muscle, beta-islet cell, and post-ischemic tissue regeneration. Fate Therapeutics also applies its award-winning, proprietary induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to offer a highly efficient platform to recapitulate human physiology for commercial scale drug discovery and therapeutic use. Fate Therapeutics is headquartered in San Diego , CA, with a subsidiary in Ottawa , Canada . For more information, please visit http://www.fatetherapeutics.com.

About BDBD is a leading global medical technology company that develops, manufactures and sells medical devices, instrument systems and reagents. The Company is dedicated to improving people's health throughout the world. BD is focused on improving drug delivery, enhancing the quality and speed of diagnosing infectious diseases and cancers, and advancing research, discovery and production of new drugs and vaccines. BD's capabilities are instrumental in combating many of the world's most pressing diseases. Founded in 1897 and headquartered in Franklin Lakes , New Jersey, BD employs approximately 29,000 associates in more than 50 countries throughout the world. The Company serves healthcare institutions, life science researchers, clinical laboratories, the pharmaceutical industry and the general public. For more information, please visit http://www.bd.com.

SOURCE Fate Therapeutics, Inc.

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Fate Therapeutics And BD Biosciences Launch BD™ SMC4 To Improve Cellular Reprogramming And IPS Cell Culture Applications

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

PIK3CA Gene Patent for Predicting Response to Targeted Therapy Issued – Exclusively Licensed to Transgenomic

OMAHA, Neb.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Transgenomic, Inc. (TBIO) announced that the US Patent and Trademark Office has issued patent number US 8,137,919 entitled Method of Determining the Sensitivity of Cancer Cells to EGFR Inhibitors including Cetuximab, Panitumumab and Erlotinib. The patent was exclusively licensed to Transgenomic by the Montefiore Medical Center (Bronx, NY, US) and includes all tumor types and targeted therapies that may be influenced by PIK3CA mutation status.

Montefiore inventors Drs. Sanjay Goel and John Mariadason have demonstrated that key mutations in the gene PIK3CA are powerful predictors for the efficacy of EGFR-targeted therapies such as cetuximab (Erbitux), panitumumab (Vectibix) and erlotinib (Tarceva). These findings were published in the June 2012 issue of Clinical Colorectal Cancer by the same researchers and have been reproduced in other independent studies.

Assays using Transgenomics proprietary SURVEYOR Scan, REVEAL ICE COLD-PCR and BLOCker-Sequencing for complete detection of PIK3CA mutations have been developed. The extremely high sensitivity of Transgenomics REVEAL ICE COLD-PCR technology enables the use of virtually any sample type including blood and circulating tumor cells. Non-invasive testing allows for more frequent and accurate profiling of a cancer as it responds to treatment and gains additional mutations.

The recent issuing of this important patent is a significant milestone in the continued development of our genetic biomarker intellectual property portfolio, said Craig Tuttle, CEO of Transgenomic. Since exclusively licensing this patent we have been able to effectively apply our high sensitivity mutation detection technologies, such as SURVEYOR Scan, REVEAL ICE COLD-PCR and BLOCker-sequencing, to PIK3CA assays in order to be able to detect genetic variations in very low mutant load samples, such as plasma, serum and circulating tumor cells.

Tuttle added that, The number of genes associated with the effectiveness of targeted cancer treatments is increasing; our strategy is to provide a complete portfolio of best-in-class kits for clinically relevant mutations using our proprietary and extremely sensitive technologies. These assays will also be available through our CLIA and Pharmacogenomics laboratories to support clinicians and pharmaceutical research and trials.

About Transgenomic

Transgenomic, Inc. (www.transgenomic.com) is a global biotechnology company advancing personalized medicine in cancer and inherited diseases through its proprietary molecular technologies and world-class clinical and research services. The Company has three complementary business divisions: Transgenomic Pharmacogenomic Services is a contract research laboratory that specializes in supporting all phases of pre-clinical and clinical trials for oncology drugs in development. Transgenomic Clinical Laboratories specializes in molecular diagnostics for cardiology, neurology, mitochondrial disorders, and oncology. Transgenomic Diagnostic Tools produces equipment, reagents, and other consumables that empower clinical and research applications in molecular testing and cytogenetics. Transgenomic believes there is significant opportunity for continued growth across all three businesses by leveraging their synergistic capabilities, technologies, and expertise. The Company actively develops and acquires new technology and other intellectual property that strengthen its leadership in personalized medicine.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements in this press release constitute forward-looking statements of Transgenomic within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, which involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those with respect to management's current views and estimates of future economic circumstances, industry conditions, company performance and financial results, including the ability of the Company to grow its involvement in the diagnostic products and services markets. The known risks, uncertainties and other factors affecting these forward-looking statements are described from time to time in Transgenomic's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Any change in such factors, risks and uncertainties may cause the actual results, events and performance to differ materially from those referred to in such statements. Accordingly, the Company claims the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 with respect to all statements contained in this press release. All information in this press release is as of the date of the release and Transgenomic does not undertake any duty to update this information, including any forward-looking statements, unless required by law.

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PIK3CA Gene Patent for Predicting Response to Targeted Therapy Issued – Exclusively Licensed to Transgenomic

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

HealthWatch:How to become a marrow donor

COLUMBUS, Ga. --

Every year, thousands of people like Noah Hein are diagnosed with blood cancers such as leukemia. A bone marrow or cord blood transplant can save their lives. The patients who do not have a donor in their family, depend on the National Marrow Donor Program and its Be the Match Registry. At this donor drive in honor of Noah , Jimmy Dawes was the 100th person to walk in and join the registry.

I saw the story and read the story about Noah and it touched my heart personally because my father lost a battle with leukemia when I was 14 so it kind of hit home for me personally, says Dawes.

After filling out the paper work, you simply swab your cheeks. Doctors will be looking for a tissue match, specifically the human leukocyte antigen or HLA. HLAs are proteins, or markers found on most cells in your body.

Roderick Gunn works for the National Marrow Donor Program.

If your tissue type comes up as a match, you would then be asked to submit a blood sample, so we could do confirmatory testing to confirm that you are indeed the best possible match, says Gunn.

Then, after passing a physical exam,the transplant is scheduled. There are two ways to give. Peripheral blood stem cells or PBSC and marrow. Gunn says PBSC is used 80 percent of the time but the doctor chooses the best donation method for the patient. PBSC is similar to giving blood at a blood drive.

And they separate the stem cells from your blood while at the same time returning your blood back to you.

In marrow donation, the donor is anesthetized and a special needle is inserted into pelvic bone, and the marrow withdrawn.

Gunn says the program needs more minorities. He says its harder to match minority patients with donors because the pool is so small. He says often misinformation can keep people away from the program. One myth is its going to cost the donor too much money.

Excerpt from:
HealthWatch:How to become a marrow donor

Recommendation and review posted by sam

Fate Therapeutics And BD Biosciences Launch BD™ SMC4 To Improve Cellular Reprogramming And IPS Cell Culture Applications

SAN DIEGO , June 11, 2012 /CNW/ - Fate Therapeutics, Inc. in collaboration with BD Biosciences, a segment of BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), today announced the introduction of the first induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-related product resulting from the collaboration between the two companies. BD SMC4 is a patent protected, pre-formulated cocktail of small molecules for improving cellular reprogramming efficiencies and for enabling single-cell passaging and flow cytometry sorting of iPSCs in feeder cell-free and other pluripotent cell culture systems.

"iPSCs have the potential to redefine the way medical research is conducted," said Dr. Charles Crespi , Vice President at BD Biosciences. "However, most current reprogramming technologies are inefficient, which slows research efforts. BD SMC4 is an exciting complement to the BD portfolio of stem cell technologies that can accelerate the pace of research, and, ultimately, drug development."

The collaboration between BD Biosciences and Fate Therapeutics seeks to provide life science researchers and the pharmaceutical community reliable access to advanced iPSC tools and technologies. These technologies are for use in human disease research, drug discovery and the manufacture of cell-based therapies. The identification of the small molecule additives, and their use in an industrial platform for iPSC generation and characterization was recently published in the journal, Scientific Reports (Valamehr et al Scientific Reports 2, Article number: 213, 2012).

"Our research focus has uncovered novel technologies to enable the commercial and industrial application of iPS cells," said Dr. Peter Flynn , Vice President of Biologic Therapeutics at Fate Therapeutics. "The BD SMC4 media additive was developed at Fate to enable our scientists to internally perform high-throughput generation, clonal selection, characterization and expansion of pluripotent cells, and we are excited to empower the stem cell research community with these important iPSC technologies through our collaboration with BD."

iPSC technology holds great promise for disease modeling, drug screening and toxicology testing as well as for autologous and allogeneic cell therapy. Building on the foundational work of its scientific founders, Drs. Rudolf Jaenisch and Sheng Ding, Fate Therapeutics is developing a suite of proprietary products and technologies to overcome the remaining technical hurdles for iPS cell integration into the therapeutic development process. Under the three-year collaboration, Fate and BD will co-develop certain stem cell products using Fate's award-winning iPSC technology platform, and BD will commercialize these stem cell products on a worldwide basis. The iPSC product platform of Fate Therapeutics is supported by foundational intellectual property including U.S. Patent No. 8,071,369, entitled "Compositions for Reprogramming Somatic Cells," which claims a composition comprising a somatic cell having an exogenous nucleic acid that encodes an Oct4 protein introduced into the cell.

About Fate Therapeutics, Inc. Fate Therapeutics is an innovative biotechnology company developing novel stem cell modulators (SCMs), biologic or small molecule compounds that guide cell fate, to treat patients with very few therapeutic options. Fate Therapeutics' lead clinical program, ProHema, consists of pharmacologically-enhanced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), designed to improve HSC support during the normal course of a stem cell transplant for the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. The Company is also advancing a robust pipeline of human recombinant proteins, each with novel mechanisms of action, for skeletal muscle, beta-islet cell, and post-ischemic tissue regeneration. Fate Therapeutics also applies its award-winning, proprietary induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to offer a highly efficient platform to recapitulate human physiology for commercial scale drug discovery and therapeutic use. Fate Therapeutics is headquartered in San Diego , CA, with a subsidiary in Ottawa , Canada . For more information, please visit http://www.fatetherapeutics.com.

About BDBD is a leading global medical technology company that develops, manufactures and sells medical devices, instrument systems and reagents. The Company is dedicated to improving people's health throughout the world. BD is focused on improving drug delivery, enhancing the quality and speed of diagnosing infectious diseases and cancers, and advancing research, discovery and production of new drugs and vaccines. BD's capabilities are instrumental in combating many of the world's most pressing diseases. Founded in 1897 and headquartered in Franklin Lakes , New Jersey, BD employs approximately 29,000 associates in more than 50 countries throughout the world. The Company serves healthcare institutions, life science researchers, clinical laboratories, the pharmaceutical industry and the general public. For more information, please visit http://www.bd.com.

SOURCE Fate Therapeutics, Inc.

Read this article:
Fate Therapeutics And BD Biosciences Launch BD™ SMC4 To Improve Cellular Reprogramming And IPS Cell Culture Applications

Recommendation and review posted by sam

Osteoarthritis of the knee is now being treated with regenerative medicine at he center for regenerative medicine.

Miami, Florida (PRWEB) June 11, 2012

"Osteoarthritis of the knee is now being treated with regenerative medicine at he center for regenerative medicine." according to A.J. Farshchian MD an orthopedic regenerative practitioner at the center for regenerative medicine.

Knee pain is the most common condition seen at The Center for Regenerative Medicine, with 90% of the patient load being some type of knee pain, top ten etiologies of Knee pain treated are: #1 Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis is by far the most common cause of knee pain seen at The Center for regenerative Medicine.

#2 Tear of Meniscus Typically caused by a sudden twist of the knee, is also very common, seen mostly in athletes.

#3 ACL Damage This is typically caused during Sports events.

#4 Obesity Obesity is a common problem in USA. It is estimated that a majority of obese people develop knee pain.

#5 Chondromalacia Chondromalacia is softening of the cartilage behind the knee cap.

#6 Baker's Cyst Typically accompanies Osteoarthritis, This is a painful swelling behind the knee.

#7 Osgood-Schlatter Disease Osgood-Schlatter disease is a condition seen mostly in adolescents male.

#8 Osteochondritis Dissecans Osteochondritis dissecans also a condition seen in young people.

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Osteoarthritis of the knee is now being treated with regenerative medicine at he center for regenerative medicine.

Recommendation and review posted by sam

Fixing broken bones a growth industry

Scientists have paved the way for human bones to be replaced with new ones grown outside the body. Photo: iStockphoto

SCIENTISTS have grown human bone from stem cells in a laboratory, paving the way for patients to have broken bones repaired - or even replaced with new ones grown outside the body from their own cells.

Researchers started with stem cells taken from fat tissue. It took about a month to grow them into sections of fully formed living bone up to several centimetres long.

The first trial in patients is on course for later this year, by an Israeli biotechnology company that has been working with academics on the technology.

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Professor Avinoam Kadouri, head of the scientific advisory board for Bonus BioGroup, said: ''We use three-dimensional structures to fabricate the bone in the right shape and geometry. We can grow these bones outside the body and then transplant them to the patient.

''By scanning the damaged bone area, the implant should fit perfectly and merge with the surrounding tissue. There are no rejection problems as the cells come from the patient.''

The technology, developed with researchers at the Technion Institute of Research in Israel, uses three-dimensional scans of damaged bone to build a gel-like scaffold that matches the shape.

Stem cells, known as mesenchymal stem cells, that have the capacity to develop into many other types of body cell, are taken from a patient by liposuction and are then grown into living bone inside a ''bioreactor'' - a machine that provides the conditions to encourage the cells to develop into bone.

Animals have already successfully received bone transplants, but in the latest study, the scientists were able to insert almost 2.5 centimetres of laboratory-grown human bone into a rat's leg bone, where it successfully merged with the remaining animal bone.

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Fixing broken bones a growth industry

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Human bones grown from fat in laboratory

"We use three dimensional structures to fabricate the bone in the right shape and geometry. We can grow these bones outside the body and then transplant it to the patient at the right time.

"By scanning the damaged bone area, the implant should fit perfectly and merge with the surrounding tissue. There are no problems with rejection as the cells come from the patient's own body."

The technology, which has been developed along with researchers at the Technion Institute of Research in Israel, uses three dimensional scans of the damaged bone to build a gel-like scaffold that matches the shape.

Stem cells, known as mesenchymal stem cells, which have the capacity to develop into many other types of cell in the body, are obtained from the patient's fat using liposuction.

These are then grown into living bone on the scaffold inside a "bioreactor" an automated machine that provides the right conditions to encourage the cells to develop into bone.

Already animals have successfully received bone transplants. The scientists were able to insert almost an inch of laboratory-grown human bone into the middle section of a rat's leg bone, where it successfully merged with the remaining animal bone.

The technique could ultimately allow doctors to replace bones that have been smashed in accidents, fill in defects where bone is missing such as cleft palate, or carry out reconstructive plastic surgery.

Professor Kadouri said work was also under way to grow the soft cartilage at the ends of bones, which is needed if entire bones are to be produced in a laboratory.

Bone grafts currently involve taking bits of bone from elsewhere in the patients body and transplanting them to the area which is damaged to encourage healing.

More than 250,000 bone grafts are performed in the UK each year, including repairs to damaged jaws and the replacement of bone lost in operations to remove tumours.

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Human bones grown from fat in laboratory

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith


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