Saskatoon woman snared in alleged fraudulent MS trial held in India

Posted: January 20, 2015 at 2:43 pm

Published: January 19, 2015

Sharon Nordstrom feels ashamed for participating in a $38,000 multiple sclerosis stem cell treatment inIndia that was not all it was promoted to be. Submitted photo.

JONATHAN CHARLTON THE STARPHOENIX

Sharon Nordstrom feels ashamed for participating in a $38,000 multiple sclerosis stem cell treatment inIndia that was not all it was promoted to be.

Im going to be a real mouthpiece now for people who think theyre toosmartto fall for stuff like this, she said.

The WinnipegFreePress this week published aninvestigationinto Winnipeg-based Regenetek Research, finding that head researcher Doug Broeska fabricated his credentials, including his PhD, and overstated the effects of the stem-cell treatment.

The newspaper also discovered that the chairman of the medical ethics committee at the Inamdar Hospital in Pune,India, told Broeska his lack of credentials and followup violatedinternational ethical standards and ordered him to step down as principal investigator of the stem-cell study.

Broeska told theFreePress he was terminated only because it was decided to have a local principal investigator stationed inIndia.

TheFreePress further reported that the University of Winnipeg has cancelled a joint stem-cell treatment project involving Broeskas company.

Nordstrom says she last heard from Broeska on June 16, when he said in an email he would expel her from the trial after she questioned the absence of a followup care plan. For months, she kept her situation quiet.

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Saskatoon woman snared in alleged fraudulent MS trial held in India

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