Genetics Society of America's Genetics journal highlights for July 2012

Posted: July 12, 2012 at 10:12 am

Public release date: 11-Jul-2012 [ | E-mail | Share ]

Contact: Phyllis Edelman pedelman@genetics-gsa.org 301-634-7302 Genetics Society of America

Bethesda, MDJuly 11, 2012 Listed below are the selected highlights for the July 2012 issue of the Genetics Society of America's journal, Genetics. The July issue is available online at http://www.genetics.org/content/current. Please credit Genetics, Vol. 191, JULY 2012, Copyright 2012.

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS

Increasing association mapping power and resolution in mouse genetic studies through the use of meta-analysis for structured populations, pp. 959-967 Nicholas A. Furlotte, Eun Yong Kang, Atila Van Nas, Charles R. Farber, Aldons J. Lusis, and Eleazar Eskin

Because mouse models have a long history in the study of human disease, many studies describe the association of mouse genetic variation and disease traits. Their power can be increased by combining the results through the statistical procedure of meta-analysis, but the differing ancestry of the mouse panels used in each study can pose complications. These authors introduce a technique to combine studies, while accounting for differing ancestry, and they show how their method increases the potential to discover genomic regions underlying disease traits.

Multiple barriers to nonhomologous DNA end joining during meiosis in Drosophila, pp. 739-746 Eric F. Joyce, Anshu Paul, Katherine E. Chen, Nikhila Tanneti, and Kim S. McKim

Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is to be suppressed in meiosis. This article provides insight into how Drosophila does that. Two groups of proteins that promote homologous recombinationMCM-like protein MEI-218 and Rad51-related proteins RAD51C and XRCC3suppress NHEJ during meiotic prophase. The authors suggest that those proteins regulate early events in the double-strand break repair response, such as resection, which influences the particular pathway of repair.

Properties and power of the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource for the routine dissection of complex traits, pp. 935-949 Elizabeth G. King, Stuart J. Macdonald, and Anthony D. Long

This article describes a resource that promises to bring us closer to the ultimate goal of modern genetics: an understanding of how genetic variation translates into phenotype. The authors provide essential information about the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, a community resource for genetic dissection of complex traits. They describe its mapping power and resolution, and present the inference of complete genotype information from a dense set of markers, assessing how sequence coverage and marker density influence this inference.

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Genetics Society of America's Genetics journal highlights for July 2012

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