cryonics Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Posted: August 2, 2018 at 7:40 pm

Any opinions in the examples do not represent the opinion of the Cambridge Dictionary editors or of Cambridge University Press or its licensors.

They say current cryonics procedures can preserve the anatomical basis of mind, and that this should be sufficient to prevent information-theoretic death until future repairs might be possible.

The advantages and disadvantages of neuropreservation are often debated among cryonics advocates.

Resuscitation of a postembryonic human from cryonics is not possible with current science.

Cryonics is another method of life preservation but it cryopreserves organisms using liquid nitrogen that will preserve the organism until reanimation.

A moral premise of cryonics is that all terminally ill patients should have the right, if they so choose, to be cryopreserved.

Cryonics patients need a professional response team to stand ready for suspended animation, when the patients are legally declared as dead.

The term is used in cryonics.

Some scientific literature supports the feasibility of cryonics.

The word is also used as a synonym for cryostasis or cryonics.

Rather, it is an examination of different philosophies and perspectives on life, offering viewers a glimpse into the science and commercialism in fields like funeral planning, cryonics, and anti-aging practices.

While cryonics is sometimes suspected of being greatly profitable, the high expenses of doing cryonics are well documented.

Cryonics procedures ideally begin within minutes of cardiac arrest, and use cryoprotectants to prevent ice formation during cryopreservation.

Unlike cryopreservation or cryonics, chemical techniques do not require freezing and storage at extremely low temperatures.

Cryonics organizations use cryoprotectants to reduce this damage.

Cryonics is the preservation through cold storage, usually with liquid nitrogen, of humans (and sometimes non-human animals) after legal death.

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cryonics Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

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