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Archive for the ‘Hormone Clinic’ Category

Arts & Events – GayRVA

Read More: benefit, Bingo, Diversity Richmond, drag bingo, drag performers, fundraiser

Bingo: its not just for blue-haired grandmas and church basement fundraisers anymore.

Diversity Richmond is set to host its Drag Bingo and the Party Thereafter, an event that mixes grandmas bingo night with all the fabulous flare of drag.

Robyn Bentley, Special Events/Fundraising Chair for Diversity, is thrilled to have Diversity hosting Drag Bingo.

LGBT folks and their allies love bingo and drag, she said. Its a way for us to all get together and help raise money and have a lot of fun.

Bentley has a long history of LGBTQ advocacy, starting as a volunteer for the Triad Health Project on the AIDS Memorial Quilt display at the Greensboro Coliseum. Her first taste of Drag Bingo was as the Ball Girl for Philadelphia AIDS Funds GayBingo! Monthly fundraiser.

When asked about some of her favorite memories, Bentley immediately laughs and brings up O69.

Whenever O69 is called, everyone stands up and says ooohhhhh 69! she explained. So, theres a little wink-wink joke there.

This isnt the first fundraising event for Diversity Richmond, which feature events such as art shows, support groups, and social hours, and its not even its first bingo event.

We had a bingo in December at Diversity Richmond, and people liked it a lot, she said. However, Bentley explained that the previous event was hosted by traditional bingo providers, without any sequins or glitter in sight.

This event is set to have all the bells and whistles (and glitz and glam).

Its different than regular bingo because theres drag numbers during bingo, she said. Then, theres an after-party with a drag show.

Zakia McKensey, under the name Zakia Jamaceye, will be the hostess for the Drag Bingo event.

This will be my first time actually hosting a drag bingo, she said, but Ive been affiliated with Diversity Richmond for seven or eight years.

McKensey is a prominent figure in Richmond as an advocate for the transgender community and the LGBTQ community at large. She has previously worked at Health Brigade, formerly the Fan Free Clinic, in HIV prevention and was also one of the pioneers behind its transgender health clinic, providing local trans clients with hormone replacement therapy and overall healthcare.

She is also the C.E.O. of Nationz Pageantry System, which showcases talents of male entertainers and female impersonators. Not only is Mz. Nationz 2016, Tarena McCray, scheduled to make an appearance, but Nationaz Pageantry will be holding more events at Diversity in the upcoming year, including the 2017 Duke & Duchess Closetball.

In short, this is not McKenseys first event with the organization and certainly wont be the last.

Diversity Richmond provides a space where people feel safe and people can come have a good time, she said. Theyre doing a lot of great things in the community to create events that honor members in the community or provide fun, safe spaces or educational spaces for people in our community.

McKensey said attendees can expect a fun-filled night at the Drag Bingo event while supporting a good cause.

High energy performances, lots of laughter and fun, raising money for Diversity, and also winning some money with bingo.

Depending on how Drag Bingo performs, it may become a regular staple at Diversity.

Were trying different things, Bentley said. Were trying this to see how this goes and see how people like it, and if lots of people show up, it will give us a lot of incentive to do another.

Regardless, the event is set to be full of laughter, glitter, and prizes.

Its just like grandmas bingo but way more fun, she said. And, you have a chance to win $1,000 so come on out.

Drag Bingo will be held on Friday, March 31 at Diversity Richmonds Event Hall at 1407 Sherwood Ave in Richmond. The 18+ event will start at 7pm, $15 gets you seven $100 games plus entry to the Party Thereafter, while party-only entry starts at 9pm for $5. Extra game packs and Instant Bingo will be available for purchase. Wine & beer will be available after 9pm and food will be catered by Nacho Mamas.

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Arts & Events – GayRVA

Core Care adding primary care and other medical services – The San Luis Obispo Tribune

Core Care adding primary care and other medical services
The San Luis Obispo Tribune
Cambrians soon will have more in-town choices for medical care, with family practice, primary care and regenerative medicine coming to Core Care in early May, according to the clinic's founder Kirk Azevedo. He said that CORECareMD is partnering with …

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Core Care adding primary care and other medical services – The San Luis Obispo Tribune

How to build a female reproductive system that fits in the palm of your hand – PBS NewsHour

Scientists have unveiled a five-organ female reproductive system on a chip small enough to hold in your hand. Photo by HyacinthEmpinao/STAT

BOSTON So-called organs on a chip small blobs of tissue growing in lab dishes that mimic the function of their human counterparts have promise for basic science and drug development. And those efforts are scaling up. On Tuesday scientists unveiled a five-organ female reproductive system on a chip small enough to hold in your hand, and showed that it could simulate a 28-day menstrual cycle.

The chip is part of an effort funded by the National Institutes of Health to build an entire human body-on-a-chip a creation that would involve all of the organ systems and allow researchers to run unprecedentedly precise experiments on human tissue. Other research groups are also working on chips that mimic multiple organs, for instance the liver, heart, and blood vessels.

In this case, the chip is about the size of a hardcover book and studded with Lego-like blocks, each of which is hollowed-out and holds bits of tissue growing on plastic scaffolding: ovary, fallopian tube, uterus, cervix, liver. (The ovary samples come from mice ovaries are rarely removed from healthy women while the tissue for the fallopian tubes, uterus, and cervix comes from women who had hysterectomies.) The blocks are connected by minuscule tubes to simulate how the real organs communicate with each other in the human body.

Those tubes allow hormones to flow between the miniature organs. By feeding the right cocktail of hormones into the ovary block, the researchers were able to coax the miniature organ to release an egg, and to produce hormones that flowed into each organ downstream, causing them to behave similarly to how they do in the human body.

READ MORE: From ovary to uterus: studying the overlooked transport in between

This is the first menstrual cycle on-a-chip, said Teresa Woodruff, the studys primary investigator and a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

The results were published Tuesday in Nature Communications.

All about EVATAR

The chip dubbed EVATAR, a portmanteau of the biblical Eve and a representative avatar could someday be used to test the effects of drugs on human tissues before putting them into the human body. Right now, animals play that role but scientists wonder if animals different physiology might be one reason that so many drugs never make it into the clinic.

Building the EVATAR was a team effort, with multiple groups working to build the organ systems and a crack team of biomedical engineers in Cambridge, Mass., handling the design of the chip itself.

Jonathan Coppeta, a biomedical engineer at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, was part of that team, which built the piping system that moves fluid between the organ blocks. Its controlled by 62 pumps that can be turned on and off independently. Each of those pumps uses a pinky-sized electromagnet to move about a millionth of a liter of fluid at a time.

Such a precisely controllable system allows scientists to do things that wouldnt be possible to do in a real person, like change the rate at which hormones flow from one organ to another, to study the effect of that hormone on the organs.

READ MORE: Inside the sci-fi world of growing human tissue and organs in the lab

But because its still early days in the organ on-a-chip development, there are lots of unknowns. Researchers will inevitably face the question: If it doesnt kill the chip, does that mean its safe in a person?

Could it potentially be better than an animal model? said Jeffrey Borenstein, a biomedical engineer at Draper. Yes, because youre using human cells. Is it perfect? No, because there are always going to be limitations.

Reproductive biology researchers unaffiliated with the project noticed one particular limitation in the teams model of a uterus. The lining of a human uterus consists mainly of two types of cells but on the chip its primarily one type of cell, pointed out Warren Nothnick, vice chairman of the department of molecular and integrative physiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Nothnick said that could hinder the systems human veracity, because the underrepresented cell type gives rise to endometrial cancer. But altogether, he said, the paper is really groundbreaking.

Dr. Julie Kim, a Northwestern professor who led the team that built the uterus block, said that encouraging this particular type of cells known as endometrial cells to grow properly in lab-built organs is an open challenge. She hopes to build more life-like uteri in the future: My dream is to create a menstruating uterus in a dish.

Pharma showing interest

One of Woodruffs next steps is building personalized EVATARs, whose miniature organs are grown out of stem cells from individual people. That could allow researchers to test how a drug would impact a particular person, based on their biology.

Men have to wait, but perhaps not long within a year, Woodruff hopes to have more results to share about the male version of the project, nicknamed ADATAR.

Already pharmaceutical companies are starting to show interest Woodruff said that she has tested some AstraZeneca drug candidates to gauge their impact on the female reproductive system.

Drapers chip can support up to 12 organs, so researchers could use this chip to simulate different organ systems. The lab is also using similar technology to build custom chips for pharmaceutical companies like Pfizer.

Meanwhile, Woodruff is looking for participants to provide stem cells that could be used to make custom organ systems, which she said should happen over the next year.

This article is reproduced with permission from STAT. It was first published on March 28, 2017. Find the original story here.

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How to build a female reproductive system that fits in the palm of your hand – PBS NewsHour

Utah’s New Anti-Abortion Law Deliberately Puts Women’s Lives At Risk – The Daily Banter


The Daily Banter
Utah's New Anti-Abortion Law Deliberately Puts Women's Lives At Risk
The Daily Banter
… blocks the production of the "pregnancy hormone" progesterone. Without this hormone, the lining of the uterus breaks down and the pregnancy is no longer viable. This can happen in a few hours or a few days. Mifepristone is given to the patient at

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Utah’s New Anti-Abortion Law Deliberately Puts Women’s Lives At Risk – The Daily Banter

Kristof’s Birth Control Advice Hurts Women And Demeans The Poor – The Federalist

Nicholas Kristof titled his recent New York Times column Shes 17 and needs birth control, but given the rise of domestic sex trafficking and the proliferation of sexual exploitation of teens in our nation, a more fitting title might be Shes 17 and being sexually exploited. I should know. I was a teen girl who got help at a reproductive health clinic, which only concealed my abuse by a much older man.

Ironically, the no questions asked reproductive services provided at some womens health clinics do nothing to prevent this kind of abuse, and may in fact prolong it. Kristofs article unwittingly provides an example of how easily young womens exploitation goes unchecked. The health-care visit he describes fails to provide much in the way of true health care.

Kristof portrays a 17-year-old girls visit to a family planning clinic that also provides abortion. A grandmotherly nurse practitioner tests the teen for infections of various sorts and advises her to use a condom, adding, If he doesnt want to use a condom hes not worth it. She also persuades the teen to have a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) implanted in her arm so she can continue her risky behavior with less likelihood of pregnancy.

No mention is made of this underage girl being asked about her partner, how old he is, or what pressures she might be under to continue in one or multiple sexual relationships. Neither does our grandmotherly nurse mention the side effectsassociated with these hormone-emitting LARCs, some of which have been linked to increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and blood clots. No worries, though, as we can assume this teenager would have to sign a consent form to release the clinic from responsibility in the event of health problems down the road.

This, according to Kristof, is the epitome of health care. Obscuring the fact that there are dozens of community health centers in every state that provide the full range of womens health care without participating in abortion, Kristof claims that denying tax money to abortion providers would result in the loss of critical health services.

But perhaps the services many of these agencies offer are less about womens health than about controlling the birth rate of the poor. Kristof himself provides a cost-benefit analysis, saying, An IUD or implant costs about $1,000, while a single Medicaid birth costs the public about $13,000. But the beneficiary of money spent on birth control is the clinic and the pharmaceutical industry, not the woman. The savings for one less child on Medicaid go to the state, while federal tax money pours into the clinic via Title X funding and family planning grants. This flow of cash seems to help everyone but the patient.

This model of health care, which so often fails to protect young women while promoting abortion and birth control, has been around for a while. As a young teen in 1973, I went to an early version of just such a clinic. The nurse did not ask about the man involved in my unplanned pregnancy. If she had, she might have learned that I was the 15-year-old victim of statutory rape by a 38-year-old man. She might have discovered that I was seeking an abortion to escape this situation. She might have found help for me. But no questions were asked.

If my parents had been informed, they may have been able to help me deal with the pregnancy and the molester. But instead, the clinic knowingly allowed an acquaintance to sign the consent form permitting me to be sent out of state for an abortion without my parents knowledge or consent.

The life-altering event that took the life of my first child left me with a deep misconception about love, sex, and responsibility that led me down a dark path for years to come. No one among my peers or in that clinic ever suggested that I had been victimized and needed to be protected. Instead, I was made to feel that the whole traumatic incident could have been avoided by using contraception.

I learned the lesson well. In future relationships, I made sure to use artificial contraceptives, promising myself to never again be so careless as to get pregnant. Sadly, contraceptives did nothing to keep me safe from STDs, heartbreak, abuse, and eventually another unplanned pregnancy while using birth control, followed by the very thing I promised myself would never happen again: another abortion.

While the loudest voices in the media keep telling us that contraception prevents abortion, the facts compiled by Planned Parenthoods own research arm, the Guttmacher Institute, show that more than half of unplanned pregnancies resulting in abortion occurred while the mother was using contraception in the previous month. This, together with my own experience, convinces me of the failure of birth control to reliably prevent abortion. The false sense of security that comes with birth control use can lead to continued risky behavior.

It took me many years to learn what the womens clinic in 1973 failed to teach me. Eventually I discovered the truth: each of us is meant to be loved and cherished. Human beings long for relationships that are loving and giving, rich and deep, and even self-sacrificing.

As mothers, we are meant to give our lives for our children, not to take their lives in abortion. Fathers are meant to protect and care for those they love, especially their children. We are all meant to have respect for our bodies, and to nourish ourselves with healthy, natural, and curative medicines, not to inundate our bodies with artificial hormones.

If I, a grandmotherly, post-abortive, wounded and healed woman, could speak to Kristofs 17-year-old girl, I would tell her this: If you are being coerced, abused, molested, or raped, I can get help for you. If you are in a relationship with someone who doesnt love you, isnt ready or willing to commit to you in marriage, and isnt willing to protect you from the harm that comes from casual sex, he isnt worth it.

You deserve to be treasured, not used. You are worthy of love. Do not accept anything less.

Nancy Murray is a freelance writer and blogger. She is also a member of Women Speak for Themselves.

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Kristof’s Birth Control Advice Hurts Women And Demeans The Poor – The Federalist

Type 1 diabetes and pregnancy – WCAX.COM Local Vermont News, Weather and Sports- – WCAX

FAIRFAX, Vt. –

Starting a family is an exciting decision for a lot of expecting moms. While the reward is great, being pregnant is not always easy. Imagine nine months carrying a child while handling a chronic condition at the same time.

Like many parents, Ginger Vieira is obsessed with her 2 year-old daughter Lucy.And now the Fairfax couple is looking forward to bringing home baby number two in a couple of months.Its amazing that I can produce an entire life in the same body that cant even sustain itself, says Vieira.

Her body can’t live without insulin, a hormone she barely produces. She has Type 1 diabetes which means a longer checklist during that nine month stretch before her baby gets here. Vieira says she has to check her blood sugar 10-15 times a day and wears a continuous glucose monitor.I would love to see what pregnancy is like without Type 1 diabetes, says Vieira, where the biggest worry of the day is like getting your pants on and that they fit.

I think the typical woman that goes through pregnancy –it already seems like a lot, says Vieira, but then when you throw the responsibilities of Type 1 diabetes…

Its a lot of work to be pregnant with Type 1 diabetes, says Doctor Marjorie Meyer, Director of Maternal Fetal Medicine at the University of Vermont Medical Center.Doctor Meyer works closely with the diabetic clinic at UVM.She says about 3,000 mothers give birth in Vermont a year and 50 of them have diabetes.The highest risk is the rigor to control the blood sugar for a long time and the rapid changes that occur, says Dr. Meyer.

Which means these soon-to-be moms need to be in constant contact with their doctors.But most women who have type 1 have a good idea how to manage their health before starting a family.Just like any other woman, says Dr. Meyer, to optimize your health status before conception is key.

Back home in Fairfax, Vieira says she’s just thankful for the healthy, beautiful toddler she has now.Pregnancy is an awesome thing, says Vieira. Im incredibly grateful that even though my body cant make insulin, it can make Lucy

Vieira is an author and just completed a book called “Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes” to help other moms like her.

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Type 1 diabetes and pregnancy – WCAX.COM Local Vermont News, Weather and Sports- – WCAX

Unique Men’s Health Clinic Offers ‘full makeover of mind and body’ in Bangkok – Digital Journal

He Clinic for Men Pairs French, Thai aesthetic surgeons in discreet, luxurious Thonglor setting

Leading doctors from France and Thailand have joined forces to open a unique aesthetic-treatment center for men He Clinic Bangkok.

Dr. Richard Diacakis, a 20-year plastic surgeon from Paris, and his former student, leading Thai plastic surgeon Dr. Chayut Fungtongjararoen, head the luxurious, comfortable and discreet male health facility in the Thonglor section of the Thai capital that opened March 14.

The He Clinic for Him is dedicated to enhancing your life, inside and out, through aesthetic treatments and procedures developed exclusively for men. The clinics holistic approach employs techniques perfected over two decades and has been are enhanced by the expert staffs thorough knowledge and use of the highest-quality products.

Come and experience a full makeover of mind and body through a variety of facial procedures, anti-aging and nutrition programs, and intimacy enhancement. Options range from blepharoplasty and rhinoplasty to blood, allergy and hormone-level checks, to hyaluronic acid injections to augment intimacy.

From my first years as a doctor, I felt there was a need for top-quality aesthetic procedures to enhance the well-being of the modern man, Dr. Chayut said. Now we have realized this dream and are ready to offer the best in men’s intimacy enhancments, aesthetic, nutrition and hair services. We are happy to serve all your specific needs,

A cornerstone of He Clinic for Mens approach is 100% confidentiality. Most men prefer to keep their personal health issues and sex lives private. At the He Clinic for Men, appointments are limited so each patient proceeds immediately to a private suite where they meet with an individual medical counselor who helps select the best-possible solutions to various mens health issues.

Counselors thoroughly answer all patient questions on mens health problems, issues and challenges. And all personal information is kept in digital form in a secure database.

The He Clinics philosophy is your satisfaction is our goal. We work directly with leading authorities at our new, modern clinic in Bangkok and provide a discreet location where you can feel comfortable for a full makeover of mind and body. Our mission is to help you, as a successful man, be the best you can be.

About the Doctors

Dr. Diacakis, He Clinic for Mens founder, earned successive degrees in microsurgery, hand surgery, anatomy, general surgery, plastic, reconstructive and aesthetic surgeries from 1997 through 2000. He worked as clinic-assistant chief of Paris hospitals before joining the famed Chirurgie Esthtique Paris aesthetic-surgery clinic in Paris where he perfected his techniques over the next decade. He is committed to what he calls “surgery of well-being”, which has culminated in his newest total lifestyle clinic in Bangkok, the He Clinic for Him.

Dr. Chayut was already one of Thailands leading aesthetic surgeons when he began his studies under Dr. Diacakis in 2014. After doing his residency in a public hospital, Dr. Chayut spent the next six years mastering the arts of rhinoplasty, alarplasty, mentoplasty, blephaloplasty, lip reduction, buccal fat removal, and penoplasty.

Location and Contact Info

The He Clinic for men is located in the second floor of the Fifty-Fitth Thonglor building at 90 Thonglor Soi 2 in Khlong Tan Nuea, Watthana, Bangkok. They are open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call them at +66(0)2-381-5155.

Visit He Clinic for Mens websites or follow its social-media pages for more life-changing stories on the web at HeClinics.com on Facebook at HeClinics and on Instagram at HeClinicFor_Men.

Media Contact Company Name: He Clinic Contact Person: Public Relations Email: info@heclinics.com Phone: 087 804 9542 Address:Fifty-Fifth Thonglor 2nd Flr, 90 Thonglor Soi 2, Khlong Tan Nuea City: Watthana State: Bangkok Country: Thailand Website: http://www.Heclinics.com

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Unique Men’s Health Clinic Offers ‘full makeover of mind and body’ in Bangkok – Digital Journal

They said I was peri-menopausal. It’s a miracle I got pregnant – New Scientist

Fertility restored?

Bentom Wyemji/EyeEm/Alamy

By Jessica Hamzelou

The doctor said I was peri-menopausal, says WS, who would prefer to remain anonymous. I was ovulating, but the follicles were empty most of the time. He told me that my chance of getting pregnant was less than one per cent.

Ever since her first child was born in 2009, WS has been trying for another. Doctors told WS that her levels of a hormone called AMH, which is released by eggs, were way below normal. One of her ovaries looked shrunken, and was no longer ovulating.

She was advised to try IVF as quickly as she could. I had six rounds of IVF over two years, says WS. At the beginning I was full of hope, but after the third attempt, you start crying and questioning yourself.

After the sixth attempt, WS was advised to give up on trying to have a baby using her own eggs, and to consider egg donation instead. We were really done with IVF then, says WS. We sold all of the baby stuff.

But last year, WS came across an article about an experimental fertility treatment, offered by a clinic in Greece. At the Genesis Athens Clinic, Kostantinos Sfakianoudis and his colleagues draw blood from a patient, centrifuge it to isolate plasma that is rich in platelets, and then inject it into the womans own ovaries or uterus. The team think the treatment has rejuvenating properties.

WS flew to Athens, where she paid a thousand Euros for the treatment, which was completed in a day. She returned to the clinic the next day so the team could check for any problems, before flying back home.

Back in Germany, WS went back to a local fertility clinic for a last attempt at IVF. When she told her doctors about the treatment shed undergone in Greece, they laughed. But the IVF produced three follicles including one from her previously defunct ovary.

One of the eggs was in particularly good shape. This egg was fertilised, and the embryo was re-implanted a few days later. I was somehow full of hope, WS recalls. I had never had a good quality egg before.

WS is now 23 weeks pregnant. I feel special, she says. To me, its a miracle I got pregnant. Were really happy. Its a girl.

Read more about the experimental treatment WS and more than a hundred other women have tried.

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They said I was peri-menopausal. It’s a miracle I got pregnant – New Scientist

Endometriosis: A cause for painful periods, heavy bleeding and some infertility – Craig Daily Press

If you have been having difficulty getting pregnant and your periods seem extra intense, you might want to talk with your doctor about endometriosis. Its a common condition that affects approximately 11 percent of women in the U.S. between the ages of 15 and 44, and is most common in women in their 30s and 40s, according to womenshealth.gov.

Endometriosis classically causes painful periods with heavy bleeding and sometimes spotting between periods. It can also cause pain with intercourse, and fatigue. It can even mimic irritable bowel syndrome with symptoms like bloating, nausea, constipation and diarrhea.

With endometriosis, the lining of the uterus, called the endometrium, grows outside of the uterus, most typically into the fallopian tubes, ovaries and the lining of the pelvis. Since its tissue from the uterine lining, it thickens and breaks down just like your uterine lining during your normal cycle, causing excessive bleeding and cramping.

I see it commonly in my practice at MRH Medical Clinic, said Dr. Scott Ellis, OBGYN physician. If women are having trouble getting pregnant and they have the classic symptoms, we check for endometriosis.

The good news is that its treatable. If you have endometriosis and want to become pregnant, Ellis, or his partner Dr. Eileen Joyce, can perform laparoscopic surgery to remove scar tissue from the uterine lining, or remove endometriomas cysts that form in the ovaries. This conservative surgery can increase your chances to conceive. You can also try hormone therapy for a while to suppress endometriosis, then go off it and try to get pregnant.

Endometriosis can cause problems in the fallopian tubes, disrupting the motility of the egg during ovulation, Ellis said.

For women not trying to get pregnant, hormone therapy is often the first line of treatment. By controlling the female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, physicians can lessen painful symptoms. Birth control pills, vaginal rings, patches, shots and the progestin IUD are common choices. Surgery is saved for when hormone therapy fails, or the pain is severe.

Surgery is a last resort, but it can successfully lessen pain by removing scarring, adhesions and endometriomas, Ellis said.

The cause of endometriosis is not fully known. There are theories, as outlined by the Mayo Clinic, including blood flowing back into the fallopian tubes and out into the pelvic cavity during menstruation, abdominal cells transforming into endometrial cells, embryonic cells becoming endometrial cells, immune system disorders, and others.

Were not sure what causes it, but we think it has to do with changes in the germ cells that form the uterus in vitro. When you were an embryo, those germ cells may have migrated down along your spine and become stuck in places they were not supposed to be, Ellis explained.

Ironically, the severity of your endometriosis does not correlate with the pain you feel. In other words, you can have mild endometriosis with severe pain, or severe endometriosis with little or no pain. The only way to diagnose endometriosis definitively is through exploratory surgery, where an OBGYN doctor inserts a camera through your belly button. Ultrasound does not provide a full picture.

Join me at the Health Fair on April 1 for a talk on endometriosis, with a slide show demonstrating its effects and time for questions, said Dr. Eileen Joyce, OBGYN.

If you are concerned that you might have endometriosis, consider talking with your doctor or making an appointment with Dr. Ellis or Dr. Joyce, by calling MRH Medical Clinic at 970-826-2420. Please note that after May 1 this number will change to 970-826-8230, with the move of Womens Health to its new location within the hospital.

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Endometriosis: A cause for painful periods, heavy bleeding and some infertility – Craig Daily Press

Doctors Say Some May Be Suffering From ‘Male Menopause’ – CBS Pittsburgh / KDKA

March 20, 2017 6:30 PM

PITTSBURGH(CBS) It is the one thing that none of us can stop. Time marches on, even if our bodies dont quite keep up.

You know when youre not as alert, not as focused, not concentrating like you used to be, Paul Kozlicki, an former toy company executive who lives in Minnesota, said.

In his mid-60s, Kozlicki said he and his wife felt that clock ticking.

I wasnt as active, getting lazy, a little less productivity. Not getting things done, Kozlicki said.

For many men, its just part of getting older. Some doctors call it andropause or male menopause. With a woman, its clear when menopause begins. For men, its less clear. Its generally thought to be when testosterone levels gradually drop.

Isnt this just part of getting older?

It could be. But if theres a solution out there, why wouldnt you want to find it? Kozlicki said.

Dr. Mark Erhard is a cardiologist. He and his wife run a clinic in Wayzata specializing in bio-identical hormone replacement, treating men with what they consider to be abnormally low testosterone.

This is so under-diagnosed, Dr. Mark Erhard said, pointing to research suggesting that two in five men in their 60s have low testosterone.

Dr. Lisa Erhard is an OB/GYN who was doing hormone replacement on menopausal women. She said women would then ask her if she could do anything to help their husbands, who had become grumpier old men.

To have a patient come back and say, I feel like myself again, thats wonderful, she said.

Theres no debate that as men turn 40, testosterone levels start to fall. The question is whether lower levels of testosterone affect things other than sexual desire and activity.

Drug companies like the makers of AndroGel and Axiron argue that testosterone can solve a lot of problems. Perhaps youve seen commercials for topical sprays or gels to fight Low T.

Kozlickis search for answers led him to the Erhards Wayzata clinic. He was given a male hormone health questionnaire with 30 questions, including: Is sex less satisfying? Are you easily annoyed? Is your thinking not as sharp?

Patients with enough yes answers are given blood tests, and Kozlicki tested with what Mark Erhard considered to be a low level of testosterone.

Below the range I should be in for my age group, Kozlicki said, characterizing his level.

Kozlicki had six of tiny bio-identical testosterone pellets implanted beneath the skin near his behind, which he said he didnt feel at all. But he felt the results within a week.

It changes their lives, Mark Erhard said. Ive warned some guys. Are you ready for the change? Youll have energy youve not felt in 25 years. Youll see life differently.

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Kozlicki said his quality of life was good before testosterone therapy and great after.

I literally had a great night sleep. Im jumping out of bed in the morning, he said.

Test results confirmed the pellets had more than tripled his testosterone levels.

But testosterone therapy is relatively new, and the data on whether it works on more than just low libido is mixed. The possible upside is big for men looking to keep their edge, maybe even a larger upside financially for drug makers.

This is an area of interest, absolutely. Its a huge question, Dr. Bruce Redmon, an endocrinologist at the University of Minnesota who specializes in male reproductive and sexual function, said. I think a lot of the better science would question how many of those benefits are real.

The University of Minnesota is part of a large new study just published in the New England Journal of Medicine. 50,000men older than 65 were screened for low testosterone, but only 800 tested low enough to be included.

Of the 700 who completed the year in the study, the half put on testosterone gels had better sexual desire and activity, they reported walking more strongly too.

Men who received testosterone reported better sexual function, including activity, desire, and erectile function, than those who received placebo, researchers said.

But testosterone did not improve focus, change sleep, or lead to walking longer distances.

However, testosterone was associated with small but significant benefits with respect to mood and depressive symptoms. Men in the testosterone group were also more likely than those in the placebo group to report that their energy was better, researchers reported.

Because only men older than 65 were tested, and for just one year, researchers recommended larger and longer trials. The only large study so far is from the Kansas City VA Medical Center, looking at medical records of tens of thousands of veterans. It found a strong relationship between treating low testosterone and a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, [heart attack], and stroke.

Which begs the question: Why are people so happy with their results after paying for treatment?

There may be a placebo effect in some cases, Redmon said.

On the other hand, Mark Erhard says he sees the results in his patients.

You optimize a testosterone level, you dont see a placebo. Thats why more than 90 percent who start this therapy stay with this therapy, he said.

Kozlicki says he, without a doubt, is a believer. He says taking testosterone pellets has turned back the clock.

I used to walk one mile a day, now Im walking six. I found myself more active, more alert, focused. And just getting more things done, he said. It works. I feel like Im 30. Everything improved. My whole life improved dramatically.

Read the rest here:
Doctors Say Some May Be Suffering From ‘Male Menopause’ – CBS Pittsburgh / KDKA

5 Myths About Egg Freezing – Health.com

Three former BachelorcontestantsKaitlyn Bristowe, Carly Waddell, and Andi Dorfmanreunited in Chicago last week to promote boutique egg-freezing clinic Ova, where pal (and Bachelor winner)Whitney Bischoff works as a nurse.Waddell froze her eggs one year ago at Ova, and Bristoweis going through the process now.

Both women have talked about their experience on social media, and the sense of relief it has brought. In a post on Instagram,Waddell called egg-freezing “the best backup plan.”And BachelorettestarBristowe wrote on Twitter that it has put her mind at ease: “I’m taking control of my future!”

But the decision to freeze your eggsisn’tas simple as it mightseem. To learn more, we spoke withBrooke Hodes-Wertz, MD,assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Langone Medical Center. She walked us through some of the common misconceptions about the procedure, and what women need to know before they call a fertility clinic.

It’sactually best to freeze your eggs before you turn 35, says Dr. Hodes-Wertz. Fertility rates gradually decline as we get older, she explains, so you have a higher chance of success if you freeze your eggs at a younger age.Some women in their 20sarent really thinking about when they want to have kids, so it tends to be most beneficial for women in their early 30s,” she says.”Maybe they havent settled down yet, but theyre thinking about it and their eggs are still good.

This is one of the biggest myths about egg freezing.”Its not as easy or straightforward as people make it out to be, says Dr. Hodes-Wertz. “It’s very time consuming.”

First, youll meet with a physician to go over your medical history. You’ll also geta blood test and abaseline ultrasound. You may need to go off birth control a month before the process begins.

Then you will give yourself hormone injectionstwo to three times a day. At least every other day, you’ll return to your doctor’s office for more ultrasounds. After about two weeks, depending on your body’s response to the hormones, you will undergothe egg retrieval process. While you’re sedated, your doctor will insert a long needle into yourvagina to pull out the eggs.

At Dr. Hodes-Wertz’s clinic, about 20% of patients end up doing a second round of egg retrieval, since a greater number of eggs raises the chances of getting pregnant.

RELATED: 9 Things Every Woman Must Know About Her Fertility

The week after can be really uncomfortable, says Dr. Hodes-Wertz. The ovaries are very swollen, and you can feel really bloated and full. Most doctors recommend avoiding exercise during this time,she adds, sincethe swollen ovaries cantwist and cutoff their own blood supply.

Its not typical for most insurance providers to cover any part of egg freezing. And it can be pretty expensive. Dr. Hodes-Wertz says to expect a bill somewhere between $9,000 and $15,000 for the injectionsand procedure, plusabout $1,000 per year to keep the eggs frozen. Some centers do this exclusively and they offer much more economical rates, but its still expensive, she adds.

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At most clinics, about40% of procedures result in a live birth, says Dr. Hodes-Wertz.A lot of steps can go wrong,”she explains. “Not all the eggs are going to survive the thaw. Not all of them will be healthy eggs, take fertilization, or grow in culture.

And not all clinics are created equal. Dr. Hodes-Wertz encourages women to research a clinic’ssuccess ratebefore they move forward with the procedure.Some clinics are more experienced than others, and you want to make sure you pick a place that has a lot of experience with thawing [eggs]out, she says.

See original here:
5 Myths About Egg Freezing – Health.com

Thyroid cancer: treatment and prognosis – Medical Xpress

March 21, 2017 by From Mayo Clinic News Network, Mayo Clinic News Network

Dear Mayo Clinic: How is thyroid cancer treated? Does it always require taking out the thyroid? When is iodine treatment used, and how does that work?

A: Treatment for thyroid cancer usually involves removing all or part of the thyroid gland. In cases where thyroid cancer is advanced or aggressive, radioactive iodine treatment may be recommended after surgery to destroy any cancer cells that couldn’t be removed during surgery. For very small papillary thyroid cancers (less than 1 centimeter in diameter and completely confined to the thyroid on ultrasound examination), it may be reasonable to avoid surgery and monitor them periodically without treatment. This is termed “surveillance” and requires annual imaging of the thyroid with high-quality ultrasound. These small thyroid cancers are low risk for progression, especially in persons over 60.

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the midline of your neck, about halfway between your Adam’s apple and your breastbone. Your thyroid gland produces two main hormones: thyroxine, or T4, and triiodothyronine, or T3.

Thyroid hormones impact many cells within your body. They maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates, help control your body temperature, affect the working of your nervous system, and influence your heart rate. Your thyroid gland also produces calcitonin, a hormone that helps regulate the amount of calcium in your blood.

Thyroid cancer is not common in the U.S. When it is found, though, most cases can be cured. Surgery to remove all or most of the thyroid – a procedure called a thyroidectomy – is often the first step in treatment.

Thyroidectomy typically involves making an incision in the center of the neck to access the thyroid gland directly. In addition to removing the thyroid, the surgeon may remove lymph nodes near the thyroid gland if the cancer is known or suspected to be spreading outside the thyroid. Then, those lymph nodes will be checked for cancer cells. An ultrasound exam of the neck before surgery can help doctors determine if lymph node removal is necessary.

When thyroid cancer is found in its earliest stage, and the cancer is very small, it may only be necessary to remove one side, or lobe, of the thyroid, and leave the rest in place. In that situation, the thyroid still can function and produce hormones.

When the entire thyroid is removed, lifelong thyroid hormone therapy is required to replace the thyroid’s natural hormones and regulate the body’s metabolism. In addition to supplying the missing hormone the thyroid normally makes, this medication also suppresses the pituitary gland’s production of thyroid-stimulating hormone, or TSH. That’s useful, because there’s a possibility that high TSH levels could foster the growth of any remaining cancer cells.

If thyroid cancer is found in its later stages, if it’s a more aggressive form of cancer, or if it is cancer that has come back after earlier treatment, then radioactive iodine therapy may be recommended after the thyroid has been removed.

Radioactive iodine comes in a capsule or liquid that’s swallowed. The therapy works because thyroid cells naturally absorb iodine. So when the medicine is taken up by any remaining thyroid cells or thyroid cancer, the radioactivity destroys those cells. Because the thyroid is the primary site where iodine is absorbed by the body, there’s a low risk of harming other cells with this treatment. Afterward, the radioactive iodine leaves the body through urine.

If thyroid cancer is not cured with a combination of surgery and radioactive iodine therapy, then chemotherapy, external radiation therapy or other treatment may be necessary. Fortunately, surgery cures most cases of thyroid cancer, and the long-term outlook after the procedure is usually excellent.

Explore further: ATA guidelines available as pocket cards, mobile apps

2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

(HealthDay)Two additional quick-reference tools, which offer guidance on management of various thyroid disorders, have been launched by the American Thyroid Association.

Thyroid problems are five to eight times more likely to impact women than men. However, Baylor College of Medicine’s Dr. Ruchi Gaba cautions that any person, regardless of gender or age, can be affected by thyroid issues.

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University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists and doctors are embarking on the first-ever clinical trial to determine if a genetic test they pioneered could successfully spare patients with nonaggressive thyroid …

Levels of thyroid hormone in babies influence insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas, according to a new study published in the Journal of Physiology.

The incidence of thyroid cancer has tripled in the past three decades, yet the reason for this is not clear. Dr. David Goldenberg, chief of otolaryngology and head and neck surgery at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical …

Discovery of the BRCA genetic mutation in the mid-90s represented a breakthrough in breast and ovarian cancer prevention. About 5-10% of breast cancer cases and 10-18% of ovarian cancer cases can be attributed to two BRCA …

Faced with the negative quality-of-life effects from surgery and radiation treatments for prostate cancer, low risk patients may instead want to consider active surveillance with their physician, according to a study released …

A large, new study of adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) correlates 80 cancer-related gene mutations with five subtypes of AML, which are defined by the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities. The findings might …

Scientists identify two signaling proteins in cancer cells that make them resistant to chemotherapy, and show that blocking the proteins along with chemotherapy eliminate human leukemia in mouse models.

Genetic mutations that cause cancer also weaken cancer cells, creating an opportunity for researchers to develop drugs that will selectively kill them, while sparing normal cells. This concept is called “synthetic lethality” …

Combining single-cell genomics and computational techniques, a research team including Paul Robson, Ph.D., director of single-cell biology at The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), has defined cell-type composition of cancerous cells …

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Thyroid cancer: treatment and prognosis – Medical Xpress

For LGBT Undocumented Immigrants, Detention Means More Fear and Humiliation – Broadly

Often fleeing persecution or violence in their countries of origin, LGBT undocumented immigrants face heightened trauma if they’re taken into custody by United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which has no mandatory standard of treatment for vulnerable detainees.

Irvin Gonzlez was one of the nearly 700 immigrants detained as part of a series of nationwide Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids in early February, and one of the few whose story garnered national attention. Gonzlez, a transgender woman who was detained in a Texas courthouse shortly after obtaining a protective order against her abusive ex, was immediately held up as an example of the inhumanity of President Donald Trump’s immigration policiesbut the media blitz surrounding her case largely ignored one of the most important parts of her story: her gender.

Trump’s targeting of immigrantsundocumented and otherwiseand of trans people are typically considered distinct issues that can be boiled down into separate soundbites: deportations for the former, revocation of bathroom access for the latter. Gonzlez’s case, however, shines a light on the intersections of xenophobia and transphobia, as well as the horrific conditions LGBT immigrantsespecially those who are transgenderface in detention.

Read more: The Shocking, Painful Trauma of Being a Trans Prisoner in Solitary Confinement

Gonzlez was repeatedly misgendered in the criminal complaint detailing her February 9th arrest. At the El Paso County Jail, where she has been held since her arrest, she was denied hormone treatment for more than two weeks, which caused her to feel nauseated, lose sleep, and grow facial hair, Gonzlez told the New Yorker through her immigration attorney.

These are clear examples of “humiliation and day-to-day microaggressions that trans women face” in detention, Isa Noyola, the director of programs at the Transgender Law Center, told me. “Being denied their identities and their pronouns, all of these things come together,” Noyola said.

Transgender immigrants in ICE custody are often denied hormone treatment, according to a 2013 Center for American Progress report on the conditions LGBT immigrants face in detention. Although ICE’s Performance-Based National Detention Standards say transgender detainees already receiving hormone therapy before being taken into custody should have continued access to their medication, these standards are not mandatory and are often flouted.

Even in cases when transgender immigrants are granted continued access to hormone therapy, ICE has to request their medical records from their country of origin, which often take upwards of a month to arrive and delay inmates’ access to hormone therapy. This was allegedly what happened in Gonzlez’s case: US Marshals said they needed to wait for her medical records to arrive from Mexico before she could receive hormones, the El Paso Times reported.

Gonzlez had been deported six times since 2010, ICE spokesperson Leticia Zamarripa said in a statement, adding that Gonzlez was recently convicted for possession of stolen mail in addition to “at least eight [prior] convictions on charges including false imprisonment, assault, larceny, domestic violence and illegal re-entry.” But the context of transphobic violence in Mexico casts Gonzlez’s re-entry into the United States in a different light, and her criminal and immigration history don’t tell the whole story, advocates claim. In Mexico, transgender women often lack access to gender-confirming health care, including hormone therapy, according to a 2016 report by the Transgender Law Center and Cornell Law School’s LGBT Clinic. Additionally, Mexico City is the only city in the country that allows transgender people to legally change their name and gender to correspond to their gender identity, but lengthy delays and high costs mean legal name changes are unavailable to many transgender women. Outside Mexico City, anti-discrimination laws don’t prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender identity. Throughout the country, trans women face a disproportionate amount of violence; Mexico has one of the highest documented rates of transphobic murders in the world, and Mexico City has the highest rate of transphobic murders in the country. The report also found that increased visibility of LGBT issues in the country has led to an increase in violence and misconceptions, with transgender women “bearing the brunt of this escalation.”

“They’re looking at [Gonzlez’s] criminal history in a very linear, basic way,” Noyola said of ICE and of the conservative news outlets who latched onto reports of Gonzlez’s criminal record. “They’re not acknowledging the circumstances that can drive an individual to feel that they have to make these choices in order to survive. To not acknowledge the violence that trans women face, trans immigrant women in particular, is a failure of how this whole situation arose.”

Gonzlez may be one of the most recent and high-profile examples of ICE’s poor track record with LGBT detainees, but she is far from the only one. The Center for American Progress obtained nearly 200 reports of abuse of LGBT detainees in ICE facilities between 2008 and 2013but the group maintains that since LGBT detainees “often fear retaliation if they submit a complaint,” this number “likely illustrate[s] a fraction” of the total abuse LGBT immigrants in detention face across the country.

The report found that LGBT immigrants were at an increased risk for sexual assault and verbal and physical abuse by both guards and other detainees and that there were several incidences of LGBT immigrants being humiliated by guards in front of other inmates. Many facilities place LGBT detainees in solitary confinement as an attempt to protect them from the general population, which often has adverse effects on their mental health. According to a 2015 report by the Vera Institute of Justice, suicide rates and incidents of self-harm are much higher for people in solitary confinement than among the general prison population.

For asylum seekers and refugees fleeing violence in their home countries, detention can be a particularly traumatic experience. Andrea Senz, supervising attorney at Brooklyn Defender Services’ Immigration Practice, recalled the devastating effects that being detained had on one of her clients, a gay asylum seeker from Mali.

“He had been severely persecuted in his own community and came here seeking safety. He was very, very traumatized by being detained,” Senz said. “He had never been in a carceral setting before, and had a lot of mental health challenges and even became suicidal. In detention, there isn’t really access to mental health services. In terms of someone who has been through trauma and persecution and needs counseling, there isn’t really much of that.”

Tasha Hill, LGBTQ rights staff attorney at the ACLU of Southern California, said ICE has repeatedly shown they can’t humanely detain LGBT immigrants, particularly transgender women. “It’s a particularly cruel way to treat someone who’s fleeing persecution in their country of origin,” Hill told me.

“ICE has proven they can’t keep this population safe, especially because to date, they have insisted upon housing trans women in men’s facilities and housing trans men in women’s facilities,” she added. “This leads to increased feelings of gender dysphoria and to an incredibly high rate of abuse, especially for trans women who are fleeing other countries.”

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There are only two ICE detention facilities that house transgender detainees in separate, specialized units: the Santa Ana City Jail in California and the Prairieland Detention Center in Texas, which is operated by Emerald Correctional Management, a private contractor that operates seven facilities and detention centers across the country.

Late last year, Santa Ana city officials announced they would end their contract with ICE in 2020. In February, ICE notified the city that it would terminate its detention contract with the facility in 90 days, leaving many transgender detainees in limbo. The Santa Ana facility, Hill said, housed “sometimes up to half of the trans folks” in ICE custody nationwide, some of whom have already been transferred to men’s facilities, Hill said. Others will be sent to the new Prairieland facility. Although immigration advocates initially viewed Santa Ana’s severed ties with ICE as a net positive, some are now worried that detaineesespecially those who are transgenderwill be adversely affected.

“There are less resources available to immigrants in Texas, including access to attorneys,” Hill said. “If you have an attorney, you’re more likely to be granted asylum.”

The fact that many transgender detainees will be sent to a for-profit facility is also worrying for advocates. “At least in Santa Ana, there’s an activist community that is making an effort to hold the city accountable,” she added. “With these private detention facilities, it’s just a board of directors trying to make money off locking people up. The safety expectations and the standards are very low.”

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For LGBT Undocumented Immigrants, Detention Means More Fear and Humiliation – Broadly

The Incredible Plan To Restore A Woman’s Fertility And Defy The Limits Of Nature – Gizmodo Australia

Over the course of seven years, Sezenia Tzeni endured seven rounds of in vitro fertilisation. Typically, women undergo only three or four IVF treatments before either getting pregnant or giving up. But for Tzeni and her husband, conceiving a child was more important than almost anything else.

“My mother and friends told me to do an adoption,” 36-year-old Tzeni told Gizmodo. “But I wanted to feel it, to feel the feeling of pregnancy and the moving in my belly.”

Each time, though, the cycle of hope and disappointment became more devastating. After the seventh round, finally, she stopped trying.

Then, in 2015, a friend told Tzeni, who lives on a small island in Greece, about a clinic in Athens called Genesis. There, a gynecologist named Konstantinos Sfakianoudis claimed to have found a way to rejuvenate ageing ovaries with a blood treatment typically used for healing wounds. So far, Sfakianoudis says, the technique has helped nine women nearing menopause who were having difficulty conceiving to get pregnant via IVF. In pre-clinical trial data provided by Sfakianoudis, 11 of 27 menopausal women saw menopause reversed, with hormone levels returning to those associated with fertility, and menstruation beginning again. Two of those women were able to generate healthy eggs, and one of them got pregnant, though she has not yet given birth.

In another case study, a menopausal German woman treated by Genesis got pregnant and gave birth, according to information Sfakianoudis provided to Gizmodo.

Now, the group is planning to bring its treatment to the US. Genesis is currently in the process of enrolling 50 patients in a clinical trial in collaboration with scientists from UC Berkeley and a La Jolla IVF practice. But the clinic’s work has engendered plenty of scepticism. Its bold claim suggests it has managed to reverse a milestone event in a woman’s life in a sense, to undo the process of ageing itself. But other than a brief presentation at a conference last winter, Genesis has yet to publish its findings. And even if its technique works, some wonder: Is reinstating fertility in women well into their 50s and 60s something we should even really be doing?

“We were sceptical, too, when it started to work,” Sfakianoudis told Gizmodo, via phone from Greece. “Now I could not be more optimistic.”

This seemingly miraculous treatment contradicts what has been considered fact since the 1950s: That women are born with all the eggs they will ever have. Estimates suggest that from the time she is born, a woman loses about 1000 egg cells, called oocytes, a month. At puberty, oocytes begin to mature, and during each cycle of ovulation, usually just one ripens to maturity. Eventually, at some point, conventional wisdom holds that a woman’s supply of oocytes runs out. Her ovaries stop producing the hormones needed to maintain fertility, and she enters menopause.

Over the past decade or so, though, a small trickle of research has challenged this picture. In 2004, a reproductive biologist then at Massachusetts General Hospital named Jonathan Tilly published a paper suggesting that in mice, oocytes were regularly replenished by stem cells. If he was right (and if the finding held true in humans) it meant that stem cells could be harnessed to produce new eggs, perhaps even reverse menopause. His work was and still is controversial. But since then, new research by Tilly and others gave the idea more credibility. A year after his initial study, Tilly announced that he had identified bone marrow as the source of those egg-producing stem cells. In 2009, a team in China reported that they had similarly isolated “female germline stem cells” in the ovarian tissue of mice, which they then transplanted into infertile mice. Eventually, the mice were able to give birth.

The Greek group’s work is rooted in this idea, that a woman’s ovaries might just need a boost from stem cells, or something else to kickstart egg production again. Instead of stem cells, though, Genesis turned to a blood treatment known as platelet-rich plasma (PRP). It’s an old practice typically used to help muscle and tendon injuries heal faster, though just how effective it is for healing remains unclear. The idea is to spin down a sample of a person’s blood in a centrifuge to isolate molecules that help trigger tissue and blood vessel growth, then inject this enriched blood back into the body, hopefully stimulating tissue regeneration to help a wound heal faster. Bone marrow transplants and (the far less invasive) PRP transfusions contain similar growth factors, so Genesis put two-and-two together and began offering their clients transfusions of PRP.

Genesis’ idea isn’t totally without precedent. At least one fertility clinic in New York offers PRP as a “ovarian rejuvenation treatment” for a cool $US3500 ($4550), citing, accompanied by many asterisks, a single case study presented at a conference of a postmenopausal woman who gave birth after being treated with PRP. A 2015 Chinese study of five infertile women with thin uterine linings all became pregnant after PRP infusions stimulated that lining to grow thicker. A similar trial is currently underway at UCSF. Meanwhile, OvaScience, a biotech startup founded by Tilly, is working to rejuvenate egg cells from older women by adding new cytoplasm and mitochondria.

In 2015, the Greek clinic began treating patients past and nearing menopause with PRP, as well as younger women who had other conditions like uterine scarring that made it difficult to conceive. They found that in all three scenarios, PRP seemed to stimulate egg production. Additionally, and notably less scientifically, they concluded that “the overall state of feminine mental and physical health appeared to improve significantly with the restoration of youthful hormone levels”.

Last July, Sfakianoudis’s team presented early results at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology annual meeting in Finland. More recently, the clinic partnered with a biotech firm with transhumanist leanings, Ascendance Biomedical, to spin the treatment off into a company, Inovium.

The US trials are an effort by the company to gather more data to back up their findings and lend it legitimacy. The trial will be held at the Center for Advanced Genetics in Carlsbad, CA and supervised by Michael and Irina Conboy, a husband and wife research team at UC Berkeley known for their pioneering work studying ageing and rejuvenation in mice.

Still, it’s hard not to raise an eyebrow at a company that mixes up the name of the scientist who supposedly inspired its work on the “science” tab of the company website. (Inovium referred to scientist Jonathan Tilly as “Dr Roger Tilley”. When Gizmodo pointed this out, the company edited the page, but still spelled Tilly’s name incorrectly.) More troublingly, Inovium and Genesis are offering women that are desperate for children and willing to pay a very high price a treatment for which they still have published no peer-reviewed data, have done very small studies, and have little more than untested theories to explain how it all actually works.

“I would be very cautious proceeding with such a clinical investigation,” said Christos Coutifaris, president-elect of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. “Infertility patients are very vulnerable,” he added, referring to the emotional toll that fertility treatments can take.

Genesis is the biggest private fertility clinic in Greece. Fertility is big business the industry is expected to surpass $US30 billion ($39 billion) by 2023 and Genesis’ founder, Kostas Pantos, envisioned turning Greece into a hub for medical tourism in this fast-growing market. Since opening in 1995, the clinic has often been at the forefront of fertility technology, with early forays into genetic screening of embryos and research identifying which embryos are most likely to make it to term.

So far, more than 60 women who were either past menopause or having trouble getting pregnant have received PRP treatment at Genesis, including Tzeni, according to Sfakianoudis. In over 75 per cent of those cases, the clinic claims that hormone levels (AMH, FSH, LH and Estradiol) returned to “youthful levels”. The nine women who ultimately wound up pregnant after undergoing PRP and IVF were between 36 and 54, and experienced no complications.

“We’re still in the very early process of trying to figure out when it works, how it works, and why it works,” Sfakianoudis said.

Ultimately, the end goal is to publish the results of the US trial in a peer-reviewed journal.

Michael and Irina Conboy, the Berkeley scientists who have signed on as advisors and researchers on the project, said that while it’s plausible the treatment works and early data is promising, a proper pilot study is needed before anyone can really judge anything.

“What I like most about this trial,” Michael Conboy told Gizmodo, “is that it sounds very unlikely it will harm anyone.”

Unlike traditional PRP transfusions, which require donor blood, the Greek clinic’s procedure uses a patient’s own genetic material, removing their blood plasma, enriching it, and then injecting it back into the ovaries in a relatively noninvasive procedure. The study will look at menopausal and perimenopausal women looking to conceive, and follow them through IVF treatment and, if all goes well, birth.

The Conboys said that they were enticed by the clinic and spin-off company seeking to back-up its wild-sounding claims with actual science.

“They specifically mentioned that they don’t want to be another Ambrosia,” Irina Conboy said, referencing the Silicon Valley startup that offers blood transfusions to youth-seekers based on questionable science. “All of this needs to start with a study,” she added.

The Conboy’s own lab has found that old blood can be damaging to younger mice, and that young blood is not as effective at rejuvenation as fans of the theory, like billionaire Peter Thiel, have hoped it would be. The couple’s work, though, has also indicated that regulating certain blood proteins that change with age to maintain youthful levels can allow stem cells to more effectively repair the body, as they do in youth.

“The idea is that the stem cells themselves are not too old, but it’s the environment around them that suppresses them,” Conboy said.

PRP, he speculated, could be sending signals to stem cells in the ovaries that produce oocytes to regenerate.

The trial is still in its early stages basic details, like whether or not UC Berkeley will officially oversee it, are still being worked out.

Even if the trial does indicate Inovium’s treatment is effective, though, it is not likely to quell all detractors. The treatment raises questions of whether women at or nearing menopause should be having children at all. Because risks of pregnancy complications increase with age, most IVF clinics have an upper age limit under 45 years of age. In some countries, like Israel, performing IVF over a certain age is illegal. Most of the women Sfakianoudis’s team have treated so far have been between 45 and 64.

For Tzeni, Sfakianoudis concluded that her pregnancy woes were due to chronic inflammation in the lining of her uterus.

At first, the clinic tried treating the inflammation with several different antibiotic pills. Still, there was significant inflammation. Then they tried PRP. The inflammation disappeared.

“He told me, ‘Now it’s perfect to have embryos success,'” she said of Sfakianoudis. “He told me, ‘Don’t worry, you will have children and I’m sure you will have twins.'”

After another round of IVF, on 17 September 2016 she gave birth to twins.

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“It’s a disgrace, the way in which your government has treated our state.” South Australia’s premier, Jay Weatherill, didn’t mince his words when he was standing face to face with the federal government’s minister for energy Josh Frydenberg on live TV during a press conference about the state’s energy policy.

The Federal Government has announced a $2 billion expansion of the Snowy Mountains hydro scheme, increasing the 4,000 megawatt output by 50 per cent – a plan that will power up to 500,000 homes. The decision has been met with much impressed nodding from fellow politicians, and now here’s what experts have to say about it.

Originally posted here:
The Incredible Plan To Restore A Woman’s Fertility And Defy The Limits Of Nature – Gizmodo Australia

The Crazy Plan to Restore a Woman’s Fertilityand Defy the Limits of Nature – Gizmodo

Over the course of seven years, Sezenia Tzeni endured seven rounds of in vitro fertilization. Typically, women undergo only three or four IVF treatments before either getting pregnant or giving up. But for Tzeni and her husband, conceiving a child was more important than almost anything else.

My mother and friends told me to do an adoption, 36-year-old Tzeni told Gizmodo. But I wanted to feel it, to feel the feeling of pregnancy and the moving in my belly.

Each time, though, the cycle of hope and disappointment became more devastating. After the seventh round, finally, she stopped trying.

Then, in 2015, a friend told Tzeni, who lives on a small island in Greece, about a clinic in Athens called Genesis. There, a gynecologist named Konstantinos Sfakianoudis claimed to have found a way to rejuvenate aging ovaries with a blood treatment typically used for healing wounds. So far, Sfakianoudis says, the technique has helped nine women nearing menopause who were having difficulty conceiving to get pregnant via IVF. In pre-clinical trial data provided by Sfakianoudis, 11 of 27 menopausal women saw menopause reversed, with hormone levels returning to those associated with fertility, and menstruation beginning again. Two of those women were able to generate healthy eggs, and one of them got pregnant, though she has not yet given birth.

In another case study, a menopausal German woman treated by Genesis got pregnant and gave birth, according to information Sfakianoudis provided to Gizmodo.

Now, the group is planning to bring its treatment to the US. Genesis is currently in the process of enrolling 50 patients in a clinical trial in collaboration with scientists from UC Berkeley and a La Jolla IVF practice. But the clinics work has engendered plenty of skepticism. Its bold claim suggests it has managed to reverse a milestone event in a womans lifein a sense, to undo the process of aging itself. But other than a brief presentation at a conference last summer, Genesis has yet to publish its findings. And even if its technique works, some wonder, is reinstating fertility in women well into their fifties and sixties something we should even really be doing?

We were skeptical, too, when it started to work, Sfakianoudis told Gizmodo, via phone from Greece. Now I could not be more optimistic.

This seemingly miraculous treatment contradicts what has been considered fact since the 1950s: That women are born with all the eggs they will ever have. Estimates suggest that from the time she is born, a woman loses about 1,000 egg cells, called oocytes, a month. At puberty, oocytes begin to mature, and during each cycle of ovulation, usually just one ripens to maturity. Eventually, at some point, conventional wisdom holds that a womans supply of oocytes runs out. Her ovaries stop producing the hormones needed to maintain fertility, and she enters menopause.

Over the past decade or so, though, a small trickle of research has challenged this picture. In 2004, a reproductive biologist then at Massachusetts General Hospital named Jonathan Tilly published a paper suggesting that in mice, oocytes were regularly replenished by stem cells. If he was right (and if the finding held true in humans)it meant that stem cells could be harnessed to produce new eggs, perhaps even reverse menopause. His work wasand still iscontroversial. But since then, new research by Tilly and others gave the idea more credibility. A year after his initial study, Tilly announced that he had identified bone marrow as the source of those egg-producing stem cells. In 2009, a team in China reported that they had similarly isolated female germline stem cells in the ovarian tissue of mice, which they then transplanted into infertile mice. Eventually, the mice were able to give birth.

The Greek groups work is rooted in this idea, that a womans ovaries might just need a boostfrom stem cells, or something elseto kickstart egg production again. Instead of stem cells, though, Genesis turned to a blood treatment known as platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Its an old practice typically used to help muscle and tendon injuries heal faster, though just how effective it is for healing remains unclear. The idea is to spin down a sample of a persons blood in a centrifuge to isolate molecules that help trigger tissue and blood vessel growth, then inject this enriched blood back into the body, hopefully stimulating tissue regeneration to help a wound heal faster. Bone marrow transplants and (the far less invasive) PRP transfusions contain similar growth factors, so Genesis put two-and-two together and began offering their clients transfusions of PRP.

Genesis idea isnt totally without precedent. At least one fertility clinic in New York offers PRP as a ovarian rejuvenation treatment for a cool $3,500, citing, accompanied by many asterisks, a single case study presented at a conference of a postmenopausal woman who gave birth after being treated with PRP. A 2015 Chinese study of five infertile women with thin uterine linings all became pregnant after PRP infusions stimulated that lining to grow thicker. A similar trial is currently underway at UCSF. Meanwhile, OvaScience, a biotech startup founded by Tilly, is working to rejuvenate egg cells from older women by adding new cytoplasm and mitochondria.

In 2015, the Greek clinic began treating patients past and nearing menopause with PRP, as well as younger women who had other conditions like uterine scarring that made it difficult to conceive. They found that in all three scenarios, PRP seemed to stimulate egg production. Additionally, and notably less scientifically, they concluded that the overall state of feminine mental and physical health appeared to improve significantly with the restoration of youthful hormone levels.

Last July, Sfakianoudiss team presented early results at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology annual meeting in Finland. More recently, the clinic partnered with a biotech firm with transhumanist leanings, Ascendance Biomedical, to spin the treatment off into a company, Inovium.

The US trials are an effort by the company to gather more data to back up their findings and lend it legitimacy. The trial will be held at the Center for Advanced Genetics in Carlsbad, CA and supervised by Michael and Irina Conboy, a husband and wife research team at UC Berkeley known for their pioneering work studying aging and rejuvenation in mice.

Still, its hard not to raise an eyebrow at a company that mixes up the name of the scientist who supposedly inspired its work on the science tab of the company website. (Inovium referred to scientist Jonathan Tilly as Dr. Roger Tilley. When Gizmodo pointed this out, the company edited the page, but still spelled Tillys name incorrectly.) More troublingly, Inovium and Genesis are offering women that are desperate for children and willing to pay a very high price a treatment for which they still have published no peer-reviewed data, have done very small studies, and have little more than untested theories to explain how it all actually works.

I would be very cautious proceeding with such a clinical investigation, said Christos Coutifaris, president-elect of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Infertility patients are very vulnerable, he added, referring to the emotional toll that fertility treatments can take.

Genesis is the biggest private fertility clinic in Greece. Fertility is big businessthe industry is expected to surpass $30 billion by 2023and Genesis founder, Kostas Pantos, envisioned turning Greece into a hub for medical tourism in this fast-growing market. Since opening in 1995, the clinic has often been at the forefront of fertility technology, with early forays into genetic screening of embryos and research identifying which embryos are most likely to make it to term.

So far, more than 60 women who were either past menopause or having trouble getting pregnant have received PRP treatment at Genesis, including Tzeni, according to Sfakianoudis. In over 75 percent of those cases, the clinic claims that hormone levels (AMH, FSH, LH, and Estradiol) returned to youthful levels. The nine women who ultimately wound up pregnant after undergoing PRP and IVF were between 36 and 54, and experienced no complications.

Were still in the very early process of trying to figure out when it works, how it works and why it works, Sfakianoudis said.

Ultimately, the end goal is to publish the results of the US trial in a peer-reviewed journal.

Michael and Irina Conboy, the Berkeley scientists who have signed on as advisors and researchers on the project, said that while its plausible the treatment works and early data is promising, a proper pilot study is needed before anyone can really judge anything.

What I like most about this trial, Michael Conboy told Gizmodo, is that it sounds very unlikely it will harm anyone.

Unlike traditional PRP transfusions, which require donor blood, the Greek clinics procedure uses a patients own genetic material, removing their blood plasma, enriching it, and then injecting it back into the ovaries in a relatively noninvasive procedure. The study will look at menopausal and perimenopausal women looking to conceive, and follow them through IVF treatment and, if all goes well, birth.

The Conboys said that they were enticed by the clinic and spin-off company seeking to back-up its wild-sounding claims with actual science.

They specifically mentioned that they dont want to be another Ambrosia, Irina Conboy said, referencing the Silicon Valley startup that offers blood transfusions to youth-seekers based on questionable science. All of this needs to start with a study, she added.

The Conboys own lab has found that old blood can be damaging to younger mice, and that young blood is not as effective at rejuvenation as fans of the theory, like billionaire Peter Thiel, have hoped it would be. The couples work, though, has also indicated that regulating certain blood proteins that change with age to maintain youthful levels can allow stem cells to more effectively repair the body, as they do in youth.

The idea is that the stem cells themselves are not too old, but its the environment around them that suppresses them, Conboy said.

PRP, he speculated, could be sending signals to stem cells in the ovaries that produce oocytes to regenerate.

The trial is still in its early stagesbasic details, like whether or not UC Berkeley will officially oversee it, are still being worked out.

Even if the trial does indicate Inoviums treatment is effective, though, it is not likely to quell all detractors. The treatment raises questions of whether women at or nearing menopause should be having children at all. Because risks of pregnancy complications increase with age, most IVF clinics have an upper age limit under 45 years of age. In some countries, like Israel, performing IVF over a certain age is illegal. Most of the women Sfakianoudiss team have treated so far have been between 45 and 64.

For Tzeni, Sfakianoudis concluded that her pregnancy woes were due to chronic inflammation in the lining of her uterus.

At first, the clinic tried treating the inflammation with several different antibiotic pills. Still, there was significant inflammation. Then they tried PRP. The inflammation disappeared.

He told me, Now its perfect to have embryos success, she said of Sfakianoudis. He told me, Dont worry, you will have children and Im sure you will have twins.

After another round of IVF, on September 17, 2016 she gave birth to twins.

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The Crazy Plan to Restore a Woman’s Fertilityand Defy the Limits of Nature – Gizmodo

In the face of Trump’s healthcare reform, RVA’s Health Brigade steps up to cover the region’s most vulnerable … – GayRVA

Read More: Dr. Wendy Klein, Health Brigade, Jennifer Gallienne

Last night, Donald Trump stood on a stage in Nashville, Tennessee and once again reiterated his determination to repeal Obamacare, throwing his support behind the American Healthcare Act.

The bill that I will ultimately sign will get rid of Obamacare and make healthcare better for you and your family, Trump said.

This comes on the heels of a series of blows for one of the most vulnerable groups in America, the transgender community. There was the Trump administration rescinding federal guidelines instructing schools to allow transgender students to use the facilities that correspond with their gender identity. The caused the Supreme Court to send the case of Gavin Grimm, a transgender teenager who was unable to use the boys restroom at his high school, which would have potentially determined if Title IX protections extend to gender identity, not just sex.

For the trans community, who are often the subjects of discrimination in healthcare settings and are twice as likely as other Americans to live in poverty, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have devastating consequences.

There is real fear, Jennifer Gallienne said. But, we will continue to see people no matter what.

Gallienne is the Trans Health Services Coordinator for the Health Brigade. Health Brigade, formerly the Fan Free Clinic, has been providing healthcare services to the poor and underserved in Richmond for fifty years and, for the past ten years, has been providing primary care services to the transgender community.

Health Brigade offers a variety of services, including medical services, health outreach and advocacy, mental health services, HIV testing, and transgender healthcare. Because of their mission to provide healthcare to the those unable to afford or access healthcare, eligible patients cannot earn more than 200% of the federal poverty level.

Dr. Wendy Klein, Medical Director, who oversees the medical clinic and primary care services, has been at the clinic for two years and is proud to be a part of Health Brigades history of championing healthcare.

We provide a broad range of services to our patients, she said.

She discussed the Health Brigades long-standing mission of inclusiveness and and compassion to those least served, especially the trans community.

We have the long history of being in the forefront of AIDS/HIV care and testing, which led to a keen awareness of the need for excellent LGBT care, she said. We are one of the few places that have providers trained in specifically transgender health care.

Part of Health Brigades mission is to provide quality, appropriate, and affirming healthcare to the non-binary, gender-nonconforming, and transgender community. This includes hormone administration, gynecological care, individual counseling, and legal services. Health Brigade prides itself on its dedication to complete wellness, not just medical services.

At Health Brigade, we have always tried to improve the way that trans people are receiving healthcare and have more positive outcomes for them so they can live healthier lives, Gallienne said.

Dr. Klein explained that the trans health clinic was once separate from the main clinic, but has since been integrated as part of Health Brigades mission to provide overall care. And, in order to work and volunteer at the trans clinic, one must be educated and trained to serve their trans patients.

Our whole staff is aware of preferred pronouns and gender identity, she said. Its compassionate, sensitive care based on established evidence.

Gallienne, who does intake for trans patients and oversees staff education, emphasized the importance of providers understanding their patients as whole people rather than singular parts.

The most important is making sure that the people that were seeing and that the care theyre getting is quality care, affirming care, and informed care, she said. Making sure that who they are seeing is knowledgeable about trans identities and what theyre going through so our patients dont have to become the educators. They know theyll be treated with respect and dignity and as a whole person.

Part of providing overall wellness in healthcare is providing a wide array of services. Health Brigade also provides mental health counseling, psychiatric services, and wellness groups.

We have a mental health clinic with counselors and limited psychiatry services, Dr. Klein said. We cant take care of acute mental illness, but were able to provide counseling and care for general psychological problems.

Its important to see someone as a whole human being, Gallienne agreed. Its not required that any of our trans patients see mental health before they receive hormones, but it available to them if they want to access someone to talk to.

Dr. Klein explained that, built within the medical clinic, behavioral coaching is provided to address things such as smoking cessation, weight management, stress reduction, and other issues.

The integrated approach to care that combines mental health, behavioral health, nutrition, all of these things, make for a nice fabric of care, like threads in a fabric, she said.

The trans community faces particular obstacles in receiving healthcare, such as discrimination, harassment, and gate-keeping. As the Trans Health Services Coordinator, Gallienne strives to not only provide quality care to the trans community, but assist them in getting connected to additional community resources.

There is no average patient, she said. But, we do see a lot of our patients struggling with the same trends going on in the community, struggling to find resources and places they can go that are safe or that they can get treatment or care without facing harassment and discrimination. A common theme we see is not knowing where to go or if where theyre going will be safe or not.

With the possible repeal of the Affordable Care Act and increasing concerns over the American Healthcare Act, which the CBO predicted would cost up to 24 million Americans to lose healthcare coverage, Dr. Klein stated that the Health Brigades mission of providing affordable healthcare to the uninsured and the poor will only become more vital to the community.

If anything, the need for our services will increase if people lose their insurance on the exchange, she said.

We wanted to get the word out that we do accept new trans patients and that were a resource for people, Gallienne explained. As long as they meet our eligibility services, they are welcome to come. We are always accepting newcomers.

Dr. Klein and Gallienne agreed that community support is vital to the mission of the Health Brigade and to increasing awareness and acceptance of the LGBT community at large.

We exist on grants and donations, donations of money and donations of time, she said, referencing how the community could assist in supporting the clinics mission. There is also lobbying for improved care, lobbying to protect the ACA, lobbying for healthcare for all.

All support is welcome.

Health Brigade is located at 1010 N. Thompson Street in Richmond. For more information you can visit http://www.healthbrigade.org or call (804) 358-6343.

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In the face of Trump’s healthcare reform, RVA’s Health Brigade steps up to cover the region’s most vulnerable … – GayRVA

What You Need To Know About Gwyneth Paltrow’s New Supplements – Women’s Health


Women’s Health
What You Need To Know About Gwyneth Paltrow's New Supplements
Women’s Health
We asked Jessica Hutchins, M.D., a functional medicine pro at the Cleveland Clinic, to check out three of Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Wellness supplement blendsBalls In The Air, Why Am I So Effing Tired, and The Mother Load. She evaluated the ingredients

and more »

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What You Need To Know About Gwyneth Paltrow’s New Supplements – Women’s Health

Does Hormone Replacement Therapy Curb Atherosclerosis? New Imaging Study Opens Old Questions – TCTMD

A provocative new study looking at postmenopausal women who underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scanning indicates that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use is associated not only with lower CAC scores but also lower all-cause mortality over a mean follow-up of 8 years.

The study, say investigators, should reopen the question of whether hormone replacement, according to contemporary guidance, may be useful in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

This is not a closed issue, senior author Daniel Berman, MD (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA), told TCTMD, noting that baseline amounts or changes in atherosclerosis may be useful in determining a role for HRT. Further studies should be performed, he said.

The study by Berman and colleagues will be presented by first author Yoav Arnson, MD (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center), at the upcoming American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2017 Scientific Sessions and was released early to the media this week.

HRT: A Rocky Road

The theory that hormone replacement in postmenopausal women could help prevent cardiovascular disease first evolved out of observational studies in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to widespread use of HRT and the launch of the massive Womens Health Initiative (WHI) study in 1991. HRTs popularity plummeted, however, after an interim analysis of the combination therapy estrogen/progestin arm of the study in 2002 showed an increased risk of breast cancer, coronary heart disease, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. Later, an analysis of the estrogen-only arm, in women who had undergone prior hysterectomy, showed no effect of HRT on coronary heart disease risk.

In the wake of WHI, current recommendations for HRT specify that it is to be used only for the relief of menopausal symptoms and that therapy should be at the lowest dose, for the shortest period of time, Virginia Miller, PhD (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN), stressed to TCTMD. The North American Menopause Society and the international menopause societies all do not recommend use of hormone replacement therapy to decrease cardiovascular disease. That’s just a given. So this paper kind of opens up that whole argument again, in a new way.

CAC Imaging and HRT

Arnson and colleagues retrospectively analyzed medical records for 4,286 postmenopausal women with no symptoms of cardiovascular disease who had undergone CAC scanning at their institution between 1998 and 2012. Forty-one percent of patients were taking HRT at the time of their CAC scan. Arnson et al then followed the women for a mean of 8.4 years.

They found that women using HRT were younger, with less hypertension and diabetes, and had similar LDL cholesterol levels but higher HDL cholesterol levels than women not taking HRT. Of note, however, average CAC scores were significantly lower in the HRT group (119.2 vs 322.2, P

Over the follow-up period, HRT usage was associated with lower mortality (5.8% vs 6.8%), even after controlling for age, cardiac risk factors, and CAC score (HR 0.7; 95% CI 0.49-0.98).

There has a lot of controversy about hormone replacement therapy, Berman observed. There have been randomized trials that have shown that there is no benefit in terms of cardiovascular events and there have been observational studies that have shown there is benefit, so it’s a controversial area.

Whats different about the current study, he continued, is that the authors were able to stratify patients according to the amount of baseline plaque. This has never been done before, he said. It appears that women who started off with moderate-to-extensive amounts of coronary calcium, or coronary atherosclerosis, are the ones in whom the greatest benefit of HRT was observed. Previously it’s just been divided up by age and by time of onset of the treatment.

Cautious Hope, and Confusion

Miller, who reviewed the abstract for TCTMD, called the findings encouraging, pointing out that they corroborate results from the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS), for which she herself was an investigator. KEEPS showed a signal of benefit for HRT in terms of coronary calcium, but because the study enrolled healthy womenin part, she said, due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events seen in WHI among older women with existing CVDKEEPS was underpowered. Even WHI, she noted, suggested that women early in menopause or those with hysterectomy taking estrogen alone had less coronary calcification if they took HRT.

As such the current study is consistent with pieces of the other studies, Miller observed. The key thing still missing is: which target group is HRT really going to help their cardiovascular risk factors?

Also, Miller pointed to other missing details that need answers, including what formulations of hormone therapy the women were taking, how long they had been taking it for, and whether they had undergone previous hysterectomy. Like Berman, however, Miller believes HRT may yet have a role in preventing atherosclerosis.

Also contacted by TCTMD, Lori Mosca, MD (NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University, New York, NY), was less sanguine. The study is observational and suffers from the same potential selection bias that previously epidemiological studies of HRT and CVD risk were susceptible to, she said in an email. This, she continued, caused tremendous public confusion when clinical trials showed discrepant results. The potential benefits and risks of HRT can only be definitely determined in prospective randomized controlled trials, [and] women should discuss their individual situation and weigh potential overall benefit and risks with their healthcare providers.

Asked whether retrospective studies such as the one Arnson will present next week at ACC sow damaging confusion in a field that has already seen its fair share, Berman disagreed.

I don’t think that we should hold back science by saying that we’re going to add confusion with new evidence, he said carefully. I think we have something here that is not completely solved, or else we wouldn’t be having these individual patient discussions. This [study] provides a piece of evidence that suggests that women who have a moderate amount of plaque in their arteries might be appropriate people to consider taking this medication.

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Does Hormone Replacement Therapy Curb Atherosclerosis? New Imaging Study Opens Old Questions – TCTMD

Hormone secreted by bones influences the appetite – ResearchGate – ResearchGate (blog)

Bone was recently found to be part of the endocrine system, which means it releases hormones into the blood. Now, a new study in Nature has found that Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is among the hormones that bone secretes. The hormone can suppress appetite in mice, revealing a previously unknown type of appetite regulation that has possible weight loss applications.

We spoke with study author Stavroula Kousteni of Columbia University about the work.

ResearchGate: What was the motivation behind this study?

Stavroula Kousteni: Our interest was to examine whether bone, acting as an endocrine organ, could secrete hormones to regulate energy homeostasis, perhaps by regulating additional and yet unknown metabolic functions. Studies from our laboratory supported this notion, because they had shown that mice lacking 50 percent of their osteoblasts, cells that facilitate bone formation, had an increase in appetite. So, we initiated a search for a protein secreted by osteoblasts that would regulate appetite.

RG: What did you find?

Kousteni: We found that Lipocalin 2 is released into the blood by osteoblasts, crosses the blood-brain barrier, binds to a receptor in the brains hypothalamus, and activates a signaling pathway that suppresses appetite.

After a meal, Lipocalin 2 levels in the serum of mice rapidly increase, and this increase is required for suppression of appetite after eating.

RG: Can you tell us about the significance of these results?

Kousteni: The finding broadens our understanding of how appetite is controlled and provides another tool for potentially translating these findings into the clinic.

Since the underlying mechanisms that regulate appetiteand the abnormal glucose metabolism and obesity associated with metabolic diseaseare not fully understood, the skeleton may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of these diseases.

RG: Do you think bone plays a similar role for humans?

Kousteni: I think that it most likely does. All hormones that have a function in rodents also have the same function in humans. For Lipocalin 2, we show that serum levels inversely correlate with body weight and the long-term blood sugar marker HbA1c in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Also, there is evidence in the literature that Lipocalin 2 serum levels increase in lean humans after a meal, just as we observed in mice. All these observations are indication of a similar type of regulation and function in humans.

RG: What applications could your findings have?

Kousteni: One of the key findings of this work was that exogenous Lipocalin 2 can supress appetite chronically in both lean and obese mice. This property, if reproduced in humans, can potentially find an application in weight loss treatment, since current appetite-regulating medications lose their suppressive effect with time.

RG: Whats next for your research?

Kousteni: We plan to generate a comprehensive picture of how bone regulates energy metabolism using Lipocalin 2. This approach will also reveal new signaling pathways and molecular targets that may find applications in the field of diabetes management. We would also like to understand the mechanism through which bone regulates Lipocalin 2 expression, and examine whether the pattern of regulation is conserved in humans.

Featured image ofOsteoblasts courtesy of Wikipedia.

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Hormone secreted by bones influences the appetite – ResearchGate – ResearchGate (blog)

First clinic specifically serving transgender needs opens in Austin – MyStatesman.com

Posted: 11:49 a.m. Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Texas Health Action says its clinic is partly a repudiation of the tone set at the Capitol.

The clinic hopes to offer a place transgender people can feel comfortable, community activists said.

As state lawmakers engage in a vitriolic debate about which bathrooms transgender people can use, a Central Texas nonprofit is opening the regions first transgender care clinic in Austin.

The nonprofit Kind Clinic, in a medical complex near 30th Street and Interstate 35, will provide free services such as hormone therapy specifically for people who are transgender, gender nonconforming or nonbinary. The services expand on the HIV-prevention work that the Texas Health Action nonprofit has been doing at the site since May 2015.

Joe McAdams, executive director of Texas Health Action, said the transgender-specific services were a logical extension of the organizations larger mission, a product of growing recognition of the LGBTQ communitys needs, and are intended as repudiation of the tone set at the Capitol.

Now is the time to be the antithesis of whats coming from the political side of the state, McAdams said. Thats why were leaning into this.

On Wednesday, Kelly Kline, a clinic patient and transgender rights advocate, talked quietly in one of the exam rooms with the clinic director, Cynthia Brinson, about her health. The topic quickly turned to the Capitol, where Kline testified Tuesday against Senate Bill 6, the so-called bathroom bill that would prohibit transgender-friendly bathroom, locker room and changing room policies in public schools, universities and in government buildings. The measure would also overturn city and county requirements for transgender bathrooms and prohibit cities and counties from withholding contracts based on a companys bathroom policy.

I had to use the bathroom (in the Capitol), and they gave me the ugliest looks, Kline said. She shrugged and added, I love my community, so I had to be there.

Later, she said of the clinic: I cant stress enough how important it is to walk into a place where we dont feel judged.

A Senate committee ultimately endorsed the bill early Wednesday, despite overwhelming testimony against it.

The Austin clinic, which begins offering its services Thursday, is intended partly to offer transgender people, particularly low-income ones, a place they can feel comfortable seeking medical services, managers and community activists said.

Competent and knowledgeable medical care is extremely important, and extremely hard to find in Texas for transgender people, said Meghan Stabler, a transgender board member of the Human Rights Campaign, which advocates on various lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer issues.

Stabler said the standard medical path is often unavailable to low-income people who dont identify with their birth sex. Patients often need counseling on gender identification, referrals to medical specialists when seeking hormone therapy, periodic checkups to ensure the hormones are working properly, and sometimes surgery.

The alternative, Stabler said, can be black-market distributors for hormones and reliance on a medically unsupervised, often criminal enterprise, which puts them at greater risk.

If you dont have a good job, you may not have access to good health insurance, and you may not have been able to go to an endocrinologist, Stabler said. I think this clinic is important for people who need advice, who need care, and who ultimately need hormones.

The Austin clinic, which Stabler said was similar to one in Houston, opened in 2015 primarily to reduce HIV transmission among LGBTQ communities by, among other measures, prescribing pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, a medication that prevents HIV transmission. The clinic helps patients afford medication partly through donations, partly through a complicated federal process that, boiled down, amounts to patients with insurance subsidizing some of the cost of providing the medication to uninsured patients, McAdams said.

The HIV medication costs an insurer about $1,500 a month, while HIV treatment drugs can cost about double that, he said.

The clinic now has 800 patients, he said. It is, he added, the fastest-growing PrEP clinic in the country.

Brinson often answers charges that the clinic is encouraging unsafe sex by replying, Well, people are already having condomless sex, so lets take care of their needs as we can.

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First clinic specifically serving transgender needs opens in Austin – MyStatesman.com

Mediterranean diet linked to lower risk of breast cancer type, study says – WGNO

Posted: 10:35 a.m., March 7, 2017

The Mediterranean diet — one heavy on veggies, nuts and fruit, with limits on meat and dairy — is the way to go. Study after study has shown it is the key to help you live longer and puts you at a lower risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

The Mediterranean diet — one heavy on veggies, nuts and fruit, with limits on meat and dairy — is the way to go. Study after study has shown it is the key to help you live longer and puts you at a lower risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

(CNN) A study published in the International Journal of Cancer on Monday suggests that the Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer, a postmenopausal form of the disease with a poor prognosis.

The study, which was conducted in the Netherlands, followed 62,573 women ages 55 to 69 who tracked their diets for more than 20 years starting in 1986 as part of a cohort study. During the study, 3,354 participants developed breast cancer. After excluding cases based on a history of cancer or incomplete dietary data, research analyzed 2,321 breast cancer cases.

The researchers found that post-menopausal estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer was 40% less prevalent in those who adhered closely to the Mediterranean diet.

The Mediterranean diet emphasizes eating mostly plant-based foods, such as fruits, legumes, unrefined grains and olive oil, as well as fish. Traditionally, the diet allows for small amounts of wine consumption, but because there is a known link between alcohol and breast cancer, it was excluded from this study.

Many interpretations of the diet have been developed, but for this study, following the guidelines of the Mediterranean diet strictly was key.

In the past, research has shown the Mediterranean diet is a key to longer lives, stronger bones and lower risk of cardiovascular disease and even other cancer.

Diet is a significant factor in preventing breast cancer as it is one of the most modifiable lifestyle changes that women can undertake to prevent breast cancer, said Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, a professor at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, who was not involved in the research. The plant and vegetable based diet with fish and monosaturated fat are key components of this diet and have a positive impact in lowering breast cancer incidence.

Some breast cancer cells have receptors that are sensitive to the bodys naturally occurring hormones. Receptor positive breast cancers are often responsive to hormone treatments. Receptive-negative cancers are not, which leaves patients with fewer options for treatment.

I was most impressed by the significant reduction in the receptor negative breast cancer with adherence to the Mediterranean diet, Pruthi said. This study is an important contribution to the efforts being studied to prevent (estrogen-receptor, progesterone-receptor)-negative breast cancer which is known to be more aggressive and higher risk of recurrence.

She noted that more than 250,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the US. Prevention studies are very important in potentially reducing the number of invasive breast cancer diagnosed in the US annually.

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Mediterranean diet linked to lower risk of breast cancer type, study says – WGNO

Dubai clinic offering free fertility tests for women throughout March … – Emirates 24|7

On the occasion of International Womens Day, Bourn Hall Fertility Centre, Dubai, is offering all women in the UAE a chance to get a free fertility health check throughout March at their clinic in Jumeirah. The fertility check would include a free AMH, FSH and LH hormone blood tests to assess a females ovarian reserve and help determine her fertility potential.

The free screening will be particularly beneficial to women under the age of 38 years who are considering delaying pregnancy, and those with a family history of ovarian failure, autoimmune disease, chemotherapy or previous surgery to the ovaries.

However, it will be equally helpful to all women – married or unmarried, those planning to have a family or not to give them an idea of their child-bearing abilities. Depending on the results, one can choose to have egg-freezing as an option, or can start a family earlier than planned.

The egg quantity and quality declines with age – beginning in the early 30s and faster in the late 30s and early 40s. A healthy, fertile 30-year-old woman has about a 20% chance of getting pregnant each month. By the time she reaches the age of 40, her chances are less than 5% per month and this is usually due to the decrease in the number and quality of eggs. As a woman ages, so do her eggs and the internal structures of the egg become more debilitated and is less likely to thrive. Therefore, women with low ovarian reserve have diminished fertility and an increased risk of miscarriage, said Dr Shazia Magray, Specialist OBGYN at Bourn Hall Fertility Centre.

As per a news report released last year, around 50 percent of the women in UAE face infertility issues, which is on the rise.

Dr. Shazia added: As a precaution, it is important that women take stock of their fertility health, so that they can make informed decisions on when to start a family and related treatment can be sought earlier than later. With increasing age, achieving a viable and healthy pregnancy does become a big challenge and can lead to chromosomal abnormalities leading to birth of children with genetic diseases. It appears that the best eggs are ovulated first and the low quality, genetically imbalanced ones are released in later years so there is always merit in starting family early on.

Bourn Hall Fertility Centre is an active campaigner, imparting education on fertility issues in both men and women. Besides organizing free screening, the Centre conducts regular seminars and talks, encouraging people to assess their fertility health and take timely measures to avoid complications later.

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Dubai clinic offering free fertility tests for women throughout March … – Emirates 24|7

Hormone Therapy Clinic | Human Growth Hormone …

Hormone Replacement Therapy

Hormones are a key part of the way your body functions.They are the chemical messengers secreted by the many glands of the endocrine system. Some of the most important hormones are: testosterone, estrogen, progesterone, human growth hormone, estrogen, and the thyroid hormones. The production and secretion of these crucial hormones all decrease over time, leading to the difficulties and conditions we normally relate to ageing. Hormone Replacement Therapies are all about renewing vitality by giving you back what age takes away. Read More

Testosterone is one of the most important hormones for men. Many of the conditions that you think are just normal signs of aging slower metabolism, gaining weight, feeling tired, feeling moody, and memory issues may actually be due to low testosterone. In addition, while many factors other than age from diet to stress, to sleep can all affect your sex drive or libido, the drop in testosterone that occurs as men age, is often the cause of sexual wellness issues. Read More

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Doctor Allie International Hormone Success Doctor Joins the … – Satellite PR News (press release)

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Phoenix, AZ (SBWIRE) 03/06/2017 Many women find their lives deeply affected by symptoms of stress and hormonal imbalance, such as tiredness, mood swings, depression, lack of focus, and weight gain. Their productivity at work and relationships at home also suffer. Doctor Allie suffered adrenal fatigue, underactive thyroid, and of course perimenopause herself so she knows where many women are coming from! She can help women of all ages to break free from their hormone prison & live life with vitality again through her functional medicine & bio-identical hormone clinic in Hove, United Kingdom or online.

Dr. Allison Grimston graduated as a Medical Doctor from Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School (now Imperial College School of Medicine) in 1994. She was awarded honors in Gynecology. She obtained a BSc in Pharmacology as Applied to Medicine and an MPhil at St Marys Hospital in Paddington. She joined a General Practice in Hailsham in 1999 as a full-time GP where she worked until June 2016. For a year, she was also a Governing Body member of the Eastbourne, Hailsham and Seaford Clinical Commissioning Group which is a GP-led membership organization responsible for commissioning most of the health services for local people. Doctor Allie empowers women through her functional medicine & bio-identical hormone clinic in Hove, UK and online.

In 2014, Doctor Allie Grimston launched her coaching and mentoring programs to help patients and other coaches achieve Hormone Success through a unique, combined approach that considers medical application of Bio Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy and effective lifestyle management. She is an accomplished professional speaker and her online workshops reach people in the UK and countries as far apart as New Zealand, Australia, USA and Canada. Doctor Allies popular workshops focus on adrenal fatigue, stress and burnout, thyroid balance, and menopause.

Doctor Allie will join The Womb Happy Hour on VoiceAmerica Health and Wellness channel on March 8, 2017 at 3PM Pacific / 6 PM EST. Archives of The Womb Happy Hour can be found on https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2634/the-womb-happy-hour. Lorraine Giordano is the founder of Inspired To Health http://www.inspiredtohealth.net. She is dedicated to helping women live healthful lives.

For more information about Dr. Alison Grimston and to access her valuable hormone resources or have her speak at an event contact Dr. Alison at http://www.doctorallie.com.

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Doctor Allie International Hormone Success Doctor Joins the … – Satellite PR News (press release)

Planned Parenthood New York Now Offers Transgender Hormone Replacement Therapy – The Mary Sue

Planned Parenthood, ever the bastion of healthcare for many people throughout the United States, has improved their care with the integration of transgender hormone replacement therapy services. According to the programs new website, theyre offering,hormone therapy for transgender and gender nonconforming patients. They go on to also say, We also offer the full range of sexual and reproductive health care to people of all genders and identities.

The introduction of the program in New York actually began back in November, according to an e-mail from Planned Parenthood New Yorks Director of Digital and Media Relations, Carrie Mumah. With the addition of Planned Parenthood New York, hormone replacement therapy is now being offered in 16 different states in the U.S..

The move comes at a pretty heated time when transgender equality and rights are under severe fire from the federal government. Just last week, the Justice and Education departments moved to rescind an Obama-era guideline protecting transgender students from discrimination based on their gender identity. Although this was an expected move, it nonetheless causedwaves throughout those communities fighting for equality for all LGBTQIA identities.

As well, Planned Parenthood has seen better days, as theyve consistently faced legislation that threatens to defund and otherwise bankrupt the healthcare organization. As part of the bill pushed forward to gut the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), the funding Planned Parenthood receives from the federal government will also be pulled. But through various charity drives and organized donations since the election, Planned Parenthood hasseen an unprecedented40-fold increase in donations(as of December, at least).

Of course, that can only last for so long. The misinformation campaign that exists around Planned Parenthoods very existence is still going strong, and thus, the misconception that they only exist to offer abortions continues to run rampant. Its unfortunate, and bears a resemblance to the ACA/Obamacare mix-up debacle that has many Trump supporters reconsidering just what the hell theyve gotten us all into.

The move to ensure trans people get the hormones and healthcare they need is a sorely needed one, and its yet another reason as to why organizations like Planned Parenthood deserve our support.

(via Uproxx, image via Shutterstock)

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Planned Parenthood New York Now Offers Transgender Hormone Replacement Therapy – The Mary Sue

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