Page 11234..1020..»

Archive for the ‘Bone Marrow Stem Cells’ Category

Be bone marrow donors: A R Rahman’s appeal to youth – The New Indian Express

AR Rahman (Pic: ENS).

CHENNAI: Double Oscar winning Indian composer A R Rahman has made an appeal to youngsters to register themselves as bone marrow donors. The music directors appeal is made on behalf of the Chennai-based Jeevan Stem Cell Foundation to mark the world blood cancer day (May 28, Sunday).

The foundations co-founder and chairman, P Srinivasan said every year over 1.2 lakh Indians are diagnosed with blood cancer and another 10,000 children born with diseases like Thalassemia. They could hope for a 60 to 80% chance of cure, with matching stem cell donors. So, the foundation has created a registry, which is a database of potential stem cell donors, and matching donors are identified when needed.

To encourage more people to register in this database, the foundation with the help of AR Rahman has put out a YouTube video to mark world blood cancer day. Over 90 per cent of us cant find a stem cell match because Indian DNA is different and we dont have a large bone marrow registry.

If you are between 18 and 50, it is your time to save an Indian life, sign up with me as bone marrow donor in Jevan stem cell registry, said Rahman in the video.

Interested individuals can login to http://www.bethecure.in, read who are eligible and register as potential stem cell donors.

Excerpt from:
Be bone marrow donors: A R Rahman’s appeal to youth – The New Indian Express

Indian researchers develop 3D bioprinted cartilage – The Hindu


The Hindu
Indian researchers develop 3D bioprinted cartilage
The Hindu
The bioink has high concentration of bonemarrow derived cartilage stem cells, silk proteins and a few factors. The chemical composition of the bioink supports cell growth and long-term survival of the cells. The cartilage developed in the lab has

See the original post:
Indian researchers develop 3D bioprinted cartilage – The Hindu

Our view: Get registered, save a life – Duluth News Tribune

Schamper’s life was still saved, however, thanks to an international registry of willing bone-marrow and stem-cell donors, people from all walks of life who made the decision to step up and, if they could, save the life of someone even though they had never met.

“So I personally understand the importance of trying to register more potential donors,” Schamper said in an interview this week with the News Tribune Opinion page. “This is something simple that any one of us can do to help save a life. It’s so important to educate the public and community and to let people know how easy it is.”

Schamper’s story is a reminder of the critical importance of at least seriously considering becoming a registered bone-marrow and stem-cell donor in case someone out there like her, someone with a blood cancer or blood-related illness, is suddenly in life-or-death need.

May 28 is World Blood Cancer Day, an annual observance of the same reminder.

And a story in the News Tribune on April 22 offered Duluthians yet another prompt. It chronicled the moment a 40-year-old Duluth woman, Merissa Edwards, met the 30-year-old woman from Cologne, Germany, responsible for the stem cell transplant in 2014 that saved her life.

“It’s so important for us to help other people keep their families together and save a mother or father or son or daughter,” Edwards said in the story. “The more people we can encourage to cheek-swab and get on the registry, the more lives we can help save and help families stay together.”

Cheek-swab? Yep, registering is that simple. After signing up at dkms.org, a swab kit comes in the mail. After swabbing the inside of your cheek, you just mail it back. And then wait. In case that day ever comes when someone out there your genetic twin is in desperate need of your help.

DKMS is an international nonprofit based in New York that urges registrations and then covers after-insurance costs for donors. Saving a life doesn’t cost a thing.

Schamper is now a donor recruitment coordinator for DKMS, one of several such nonprofits that feeds the same international registry. She’s in Illinois. Her donor was from California. She got to meet him at a DKMS-sponsored gala in 2011.

“It was a pretty powerful experience being able to meet the man that saved my life and being able to thank him in person. It’s a moment I’ll never forget,” Schamper said. “When somebody needs a bone-marrow or stem-cell transplant it’s because all other options have stopped working for them. There’s no more chemotherapy that they can do. There’s no more medication that they can take. This is somebody’s last chance at hope for survival.”

If you could help, if you could step up to save a life, even the life of someone you’ve never met, wouldn’t you?

The need is great: Every year in the U.S., around 14,000 patients need a life-saving bone-marrow or stem-cell transplant. Fewer than half find matching donors, however. And only 30 percent find donors within their own families.

While 6.4 million potential donors are registered in the U.S., that actually accounts for only 2 percent of our total population. That’s not many of us, and the more who register the better the chances of a match when a life is on the line.

Like Schamper’s and Edwards’ lives were two moms who get to continue being moms thanks for the selfless decisions of others.

Originally posted here:
Our view: Get registered, save a life – Duluth News Tribune

UW Health trial involves injecting stem cells into patients with heart failure – Channel3000.com – WISC-TV3

UW Health trial involves injecting… More Headlines

MADISON, Wis. – Doctors at UW Health are involved in a clinical trial using stem cells for the treatment of heart failure.

The CardiAMP therapy involves withdrawing a patients bone marrow. The bone marrow is then processed on-site to separate the stem cells from the plasma. The patients own stem cells are then injected into damaged areas of the heart using a catheter.

It is hopeful that we can improve things. I dont think we can necessarily cure the damage, but I think we can improve things, said Dr. Amish Raval, director of cardiovascular clinical research at UW Health.

The CardiAMP Heart Failure Trial is a phase III study that will eventually enroll up to 260 patients. For the first 10 patients, UW Health is one of three sites nationwide performing the procedure.

I figured it was possibly going to do something good for me, said Dan Caulfield, a Madison man enrolled in the study.

Caulfield, who is 81 years old, has had three heart attacks.

I was 46 years old and had a heart attack. It was called a fatal heart attack in those days, Caulfield said. I had two more heart attacks in 2002, and since then it has been sort of downhill.

Improving the quality of life of individuals with heart failure is a goal of the CardiAMP therapy.

There is about a 50 percent five-year mortality associated with this condition and those five years can be awfully tough on these folks because they have a lot of problems with shortness of breath, weakness and sometimes chest discomfort while walking. So it is not just a matter of quantity of life, it is also a quality of life issue, Raval said.

The procedure involves a very targeted injection of stem cells into the area near where the heart is damaged.

We create a targeted map and based on that targeted map we have a really clear sense of where the damage is. Then it is my task to go in and try to get into the adjacent border areas, Raval said.

In the U.S. there are approximately 6.5 million people living with heart failure. According to the American Heart Association, that number is expected to rise by 46 percent by the year 2030.

This is one of the few pivotal trials in the United States that is really, I think, going to pave the way for future studies, Raval said.

The outcome of the CardiAMP trial will be measured by any change in distance during a six-minute walk 12 months after an initial baseline measurement is taken.

Visit link:
UW Health trial involves injecting stem cells into patients with heart failure – Channel3000.com – WISC-TV3

Breakthrough for bone marrow transplant recipients: Lab-grown blood stem cells produced for first time – Genetic Literacy Project

After 20 years of trying, scientists have transformed mature cells into primordial blood cells that regenerate themselves and the components of blood. The work, described [May 17] in Nature offers hope to people with leukemia and other blood disorders who need bone-marrow transplants but cant find a compatible donor. If the findings translate into the clinic, these patients could receive lab-grown versions of their own healthy cells.

One team, led by stem-cell biologist George Daley of Boston Childrens Hospital in Massachusetts, created human cells that act like blood stem cells, although they are not identical to those found in nature. A second team, led by stem-cell biologist Shahin Rafii of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, turned mature cells from mice into fully fledged blood stem cells.

Time will determine which approach succeeds. But the latest advances have buoyed the spirits of researchers who have been frustrated by their inability to generate blood stem cells from iPS cells. A lot of people have become jaded, saying that these cells dont exist in nature and you cant just push them into becoming anything else, [Mick Bhatia, a stem-cell researcher at McMaster University, who was not involved with either study] says.

[Read the Daley study here.]

Read the Rafii study here.]

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post:Lab-grown blood stem cells produced at last

See the rest here:
Breakthrough for bone marrow transplant recipients: Lab-grown blood stem cells produced for first time – Genetic Literacy Project

Medical Q&A: Progress made in getting stem cells to ‘take’ in mice – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Q: How close are we to curing blood diseases with human stem cells?

A: New research has nudged scientists closer to one of regenerative medicine’s holy grails: the ability to create customized human stem cells capable of forming blood that would be safe for patients.

Advances reported in the journal Nature could not only give scientists a window on what goes wrong in such blood cancers as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. They could also improve the treatment of those cancers, which affect some 1.2 million Americans.

While the use of blood-making stem cells in medicine has been common since the 1950s, it remains pretty crude. After patients with blood cancers have undergone powerful radiation and chemotherapy, they often need a bone-marrow transplant to rebuild their white blood cells, which are destroyed by that treatment.

The blood-making stem cells that reside in a donor’s bone marrow and in umbilical cord blood harvested after a baby’s birth are called “hematopoietic,” and they can be life-saving. But even these stem cells can bear the distinctive immune system signatures of the person from whom they were harvested. So they can provoke an attack if the transplant recipient’s body registers the cells as foreign.

This response, called graft-versus-host disease, affects as many as 70 percent of bone-marrow transplant recipients soon after treatment, and 40 percent develop a chronic version of the affliction later. It kills many patients.

Rather than hunt for a donor who’s a perfect match, doctors would like to use a patient’s own cells to engineer the hematopoietic stem cells.

The patient’s mature cells would be “reprogrammed” to their most primitive form: stem cells capable of becoming virtually any kind of human cell. Then factors in their environment would coax them to become stem cells capable of giving rise to blood.Once reintroduced into the patient, the cells would take up residence without prompting rejection and set up a lifelong factory of healthy new blood cells.

If the risk of rejection could be eliminated, physicians might also feel more confident treating blood diseases that are not immediately deadly such as sickle cell disease and immunological disorders with stem cell transplants.

One of two research teams, led by stem cell pioneer Dr. George Q. Daley of Harvard Medical School and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, started their experiment with human “pluripotent” stem cells primitive cells capable of becoming virtually any type of mature cell.

The scientists then programmed those pluripotent stem cells to become endothelial cells, which line the inside of certain blood vessels.Using suppositions gleaned from experiments with mice, Daley said his team confected a “special sauce” of proteins that sit on a cell’s DNA and program its function. When they incubated the endothelial cells in the sauce, they began producing hematopioetic stem cells.

Daley’s team then transferred the resulting blood-making stem cells into the bone marrow of mice to see if they would “take.” In two out of five mice who got the most promising cell types, they did. Not only did the stem cells establish themselves, they continued to renew themselves while giving rise to a wide range of blood cells.

A second team, led by researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine’s Ansary Stem Cell Institute, achieved a similar result using stem cells from the blood-vessel lining of adult mice.

But Daley cautioned that significant hurdles remain before studies like these will transform the treatment of blood diseases.

“We do know the resulting cells function like blood stem cells, but they still are at some distance, molecularly, from native stem cells,” he said.

Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times

See original here:
Medical Q&A: Progress made in getting stem cells to ‘take’ in mice – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Patient uses fat stem cells to repair his wrist – CNN

He was tired of the daily pain that made even shaking someone’s hand almost unbearable.

Marlette lost his arm in an accident when he was a teenager, but as an active kid, he didn’t this slow him down. He continued to play football and golf, running track and even wrestling.

But over time, the strain on his remaining arm and wrist took a toll.

So to relieve his pain, he traveled from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, to Munich, Germany, with the hopes that a special procedure using stem cells could make a difference.

“There’s no cartilage,” Marlette said of his wrist. “I’m bone-on-bone. It is constantly inflamed and very sore.”

As Marlette grew older, even the simplest things, like tucking in his shirt or putting on a jacket, became incredibly painful.

Marlette developed cysts and holes in the bones of his wrist. Doctors prescribed anti-inflammatory medications, but they only managed the pain, doing nothing to actually heal the problem. One day, his doctor, Dr. Bob Van Demark at Sanford Health in South Dakota, where Marlette works in finance, saw a presentation by Dr. Eckhard Alt.

It was about a new treatment using stem cells.

“Following an infection or wound or trauma,” Alt said, “there comes a call to the stem cells in the blood vessels, which are silent, and nature activates those cells.”

Stem cells are located throughout our bodies, like a reserve army offering regeneration and repair. When we’re injured or sick, our stem cells divide and create new cells to replace those that are damaged or killed. Depending on where the cells are in the body, they adapt, becoming specialized as blood cells, muscle cells or brain cells, for example.

Alt was the first person to use adipose tissue, or fat, as a prime source of stem cells, according to Dr. David Pearce, executive vice president for research at Sanford health.

“He observed that the simplest place to get some stem cells is really from the fat,” said Pearce. “Most of us could give some fat up, and those stem cells don’t have to be programmed in any way, but if you put in the right environment, they will naturally turn into what the cell type around them is.”

Fat tissue has a lot of blood vessels, making it a prime source of stem cells, and Alt recognized that stem cells derived from adipose tissue are also particularly good at becoming cartilage and bone.

Bone marrow is another source of stem cells, but these easily turn into blood and immune cells. Stem cells from fat have another fate.

“Fat-derived stem cells have a different lineage they can turn into, that is really cartilage and bone and other sort of connective tissues,” said Pearce.

Van Demark traveled to Alt’s Munich clinic along with some doctors from Sanford, which is now partnering with Alt on clinical trials in the United States. Marlette’s doctor was impressed with what he saw and recommended the treatment to his patient.

Marlette paid his own way to Munich, where he would receive an injection of stem cells from his own fat tissue.

“I had one treatment, and my wrist felt better almost within the next couple weeks,” Marlette said. “Through the course of the next seven months, it continued to feel better and better.”

One injection was enough for this ongoing improvement.

“We see (from an MRI scan) that those cysts are gone, the bone has restructured, the inflammation is gone, and he formed … new cartilage,” said Alt.

MRIs confirmed what he was feeling: The cartilage had begun to regenerate in his wrist. Because the procedure uses autologous cells, which are cells from the patient’s own body, there’s little to no chance of rejection by the body’s immune system.

Though the procedure worked for Marlette, the use of stem cells as a form of treatment is not without controversy or risk. In the US, they have been mired in controversy because much of the early research and discussion has been centered around embryonic and fetal stem cells.

Marlette traveled to Germany because approved treatments like this are not available in the United States. Clinics have popped up across the country, but they lack oversight from the Food and Drug Administration.

Dr. Robin Smith, founder of the Stem for Life Foundation, first began working in this field 10 years ago. According to Smith, there were 400 clinical trials for stem cells when she first started; now, there are 4,500. She partnered with the Vatican to hold a stem cell conference last year.

“We’re moving toward a new era in medicine,” said Smith, who was not involved in this research. “(We are) recognizing cells in our body and immune system can be used in some way — manipulated, redirected or changed at the DNA level — to impact health and cure disease. It is an exciting time.”

Dr. Nick Boulis is a neurosurgeon with Emory University in Atlanta. His team ran the first FDA-approved clinical trials in the US to inject stem cells in the spinal cords of patients with ALS, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, and he isn’t surprised to see procedures like the one at Alt’s clinic in Germany have success.

“Joints and bones heal,” Boulis said. “The nervous system is very bad at healing. It doesn’t surprise me that we’re seeing successes in recapitulating cartilage before we’re seeing successes in rebuilding the motherboard.”

Smith also cautioned patients to do their research, especially about the types of cells being used. “When you have a health problem, and you need a solution, sometimes you don’t have three five, seven years to get there,” she said, referencing the slow progression of regulations in places like the United States.

“So really ,look for places that have the regulatory approval of the country they’re in. Safety has to be number one,” she said.

Alt’s Munich clinic was approved by the European equivalent of the FDA, the European Medicines Agency. Through the partnership with Sanford, the health group is now launching clinical trials in America, focusing on rotator cuff injuries, a common shoulder injury. This is the first FDA-approved trial of its kind.

Further down the line, Alt hopes to see stem cells used for such issues as heart procedures and treating the pancreas to help diabetics. For him, the growth is limitless.

“I think it will be exponential,” he said. “It will be the same thing (we saw) with deciphering the human genome. The knowledge will go up exponentially, and the cost will go exponentially down. For me, the most exciting thing is to see how you can help patients that have been desperate for which there was no other option, no hope, and how well they do.”

For Marlette, it has meant a wrist free from pain and a life free from pain medication.

Since the procedure in August, he hasn’t taken any of the anti-inflammatory drugs. “I have more range of motion with my wrist, shaking hands didn’t hurt anymore,” he said. “My wrist seems to continue to improve, and there’s less and less pain all the time.”

Read the original post:
Patient uses fat stem cells to repair his wrist – CNN

Regenerative medicine: holy grail within grasp? – Gulf Times

With gene-editing techniques such as CRISPR-Cas9, offending genes could one day be snipped out of hematopoietic stem cells, then be returned to their owners to generate new lines of disease-free blood cells

New research has nudged scientists closer to one of regenerative medicines holy grails: the ability to create customised human stem cells capable of forming blood that would be safe for patients. Advances reported in the journal Nature could not only give scientists a window on what goes wrong in such blood cancers as leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma, but they could also improve the treatment of those cancers, which affect some 1.2 million Americans. The stem cells that give rise to our blood are a mysterious wellspring of life. In principle, just one of these primitive cells can create much of a human beings immune system, not to mention the complex slurry of cells that courses through a persons arteries, veins and organs. While the use of blood-making stem cells in medicine has been common since the 1950s, it remains pretty crude. After patients with blood cancers have undergone powerful radiation and chemotherapy treatments to kill their cancer cells, they often need a bone-marrow transplant to rebuild their white blood cells, which are destroyed by that treatment. The blood-making stem cells that reside in a donors bone marrow and in umbilical cord blood that is sometimes harvested after a babys birth are called hematopoietic, and they can be life-saving. But even these stem cells can bear the distinctive immune system signatures of the person from whom they were harvested. As a result, they can provoke an attack if the transplant recipients body registers the cells as foreign. This response, called graft-versus-host disease, affects as many as 70 percent of bone-marrow transplant recipients in the months following the treatment, and 40 percent develop a chronic version of the affliction later. It can overwhelm the benefit of a stem cell transplant. And it kills many patients. Rather than hunt for a donor whos a perfect match for a patient in need of a transplant a process that can be lengthy, ethically fraught and ultimately unsuccessful doctors would like to use a patients own cells to engineer the hematopoietic stem cells. The patients mature cells would be reprogrammed to their most primitive form: stem cells capable of becoming virtually any kind of human cell. Then factors in their environment would coax them to become the specific type of stem cells capable of giving rise to blood. Once reintroduced into the patient, the cells would take up residence without prompting rejection and set up a lifelong factory of healthy new blood cells. If the risk of deadly rejection episodes could be eliminated, physicians might also feel more confident treating blood diseases that are painful and difficult but not immediately deadly diseases such as sickle cell disease and immunological disorders with stem cell transplants. The two studies published on Wednesday demonstrate that scientists may soon be capable of pulling off the sequence of operations necessary for such treatments to move ahead. One of two research teams, led by stem cell pioneer Dr George Q. Daley of Harvard Medical School and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, started their experiment with human pluripotent stem cells primitive cells capable of becoming virtually any type of mature cell in the body. Some of them were embryonic stem cells and others were induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, which are made by converting mature cells back to a flexible state. The scientists then programmed those pluripotent stem cells to become endothelial cells, which line the inside of certain blood vessels. Past research had established that those cells are where blood-making stem cells are born. Here, the process needed a nudge. Using suppositions gleaned from experiments with mice, Daley said his team confected a special sauce of proteins that sit on a cells DNA and programme its function. When they incubated the endothelial cells in the sauce, they began producing hematopioetic stem cells in their earliest form. Daleys team then transferred the resulting blood-making stem cells into the bone marrow of mice to see if they would take. In two out of five mice who got the most promising cell types, they did. Not only did the stem cells establish themselves, they continued to renew themselves while giving rise to a wide range of blood cells. A second research team, led by researchers from Weill Cornell Medicines Ansary Stem Cell Institute in New York, achieved a similar result using stem cells from the blood-vessel lining of adult mice. After programming those cells to revert to a more primitive form, the scientists also incubated those stem cells in a concoction of specialised proteins. When the team, led by Raphael Lis and Dr Shahin Rafii, transferred the resulting stem cells back into the tissue lining the blood vessels of the mice from which they came, that graft also took. For at least 40 weeks after the incubated stem cells were returned to their mouse owners, the stem cells continued to regenerate themselves and give rise to many blood-cell types without provoking immune reactions. In addition to making a workhorse treatment for blood cancers safer, the new advances may afford scientists a unique window on the mechanisms by which blood diseases take hold and progress, said Lee Greenberger, chief scientific officer for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. From a research point of view you could now actually begin to model diseases, said Greenberger. If you were to take the cell thats defective and make it revert to a stem cell, you could effectively reproduce the disease and watch its progression from the earliest stages. That, in turn, would make it easier to narrow the search for drugs that could disrupt that disease process early. And it would speed the process of discovering which genes are implicated in causing diseases. With gene-editing techniques such as CRISPR-Cas9, those offending genes could one day be snipped out of hematopoietic stem cells, then be returned to their owners to generate new lines of disease-free blood cells. But Daley cautioned that significant hurdles remain before studies like these will transform the treatment of blood diseases. We do know the resulting cells function like blood stem cells, but they still are at some distance, molecularly, from native stem cells, he said. By tinkering with the processes by which pluripotent stem cells mature into blood-producing stem cells, Daley said his team hopes to make these lab-grown cells a better match for the real things. Los Angeles Times/TNS

Read the original:
Regenerative medicine: holy grail within grasp? – Gulf Times

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplants Could Advance ALS Treatment – Science World Report


Science World Report
Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplants Could Advance ALS Treatment
Science World Report
The researchers discovered that bone marrow stem cell transplants may advance the treatment of the disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The transplants enhanced the motor functions and nervous system conditions in mice with ALS that modeled in …
Stem cell transplants beneficial to mice with ALSLife Science Daily

all 2 news articles »

More here:
Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplants Could Advance ALS Treatment – Science World Report

Scientists get closer to making personalized blood cells by using patients’ own stem cells – Los Angeles Times

New research has nudged scientists closer to one of regenerative medicines holy grails: the ability to create customized human stem cells capable of forming blood that would be safe for patients.

Advances reported Wednesday in the journal Nature could not only give scientists a window on what goes wrong in such blood cancers as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. They could also improve the treatment of those cancers, which affect some 1.2 million Americans.

The stem cells that give rise to our blood are a mysterious wellspring of life. In principle, just one of these primitive cells can create much of a human beings immune system, not to mention the complex slurry of cells that courses through a persons arteries, veins and organs.

While the use of blood-making stem cells in medicine has been common since the 1950s, it remains pretty crude. After patients with blood cancers have undergone powerful radiation and chemotherapy treatments to kill their cancer cells, they often need a bone-marrow transplant to rebuild their white blood cells, which are destroyed by that treatment.

The blood-making stem cells that reside in a donors bone marrow and in umbilical cord blood that is sometimes harvested after a babys birth are called hematopoietic, and they can be life-saving. But even these stem cells can bear the distinctive immune system signatures of the person from whom they were harvested. As a result, they can provoke an attack if the transplant recipients body registers the cells as foreign.

This response, called graft-versus-host disease, affects as many as 70% of bone-marrow transplant recipients in the months following the treatment, and 40% develop a chronic version of the affliction later. It can overwhelm the benefit of a stem cell transplant. And it kills many patients.

Rather than hunt for a donor whos a perfect match for a patient in need of a transplant a process that can be lengthy, ethically fraught and ultimately unsuccessful doctors would like to use a patients own cells to engineer the hematopoietic stem cells.

The patients mature cells would be reprogrammed to their most primitive form: stem cells capable of becoming virtually any kind of human cell. Then factors in their environment would coax them to become the specific type of stem cells capable of giving rise to blood.

Once reintroduced into the patient, the cells would take up residence without prompting rejection and set up a lifelong factory of healthy new blood cells.

If the risk of deadly rejection episodes could be eliminated, physicians might also feel more confident treating blood diseases that are painful and difficult but not immediately deadly diseases such as sickle cell disease and immunological disorders with stem cell transplants.

The two studies published Wednesday demonstrate that scientists may soon be capable of pulling off the sequence of operations necessary for such treatments to move ahead.

One of two research teams, led by stem-cell pioneer Dr. George Q. Daley of Harvard Medical School and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, started their experiment with human pluripotent stem cells primitive cells capable of becoming virtually any type of mature cell in the body. Some of them were embryonic stem cells and others were induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, which are made by converting mature cells back to a flexible state.

The scientists then programmed those pluripotent stem cells to become endothelial cells, which line the inside of certain blood vessels. Past research had established that those cells are where blood-making stem cells are born.

Here, the process needed a nudge. Using suppositions gleaned from experiments with mice, Daley said his team confected a special sauce of proteins that sit on a cells DNA and program its function. When they incubated the endothelial cells in the sauce, they began producing hematopioetic stem cells in their earliest form.

Daleys team then transferred the resulting blood-making stem cells into the bone marrow of mice to see if they would take. In two out of five mice who got the most promising cell types, they did. Not only did the stem cells establish themselves, they continued to renew themselves while giving rise to a wide range of blood cells.

A second research team, led by researchers from Weill Cornell Medicines Ansary Stem Cell Institute in New York, achieved a similar result using stem cells from the blood-vessel lining of adult mice. After programming those cells to revert to a more primitive form, the scientists also incubated those stem cells in a concoction of specialized proteins.

When the team, led by Raphael Lis and Dr. Shahin Rafii, transferred the resulting stem cells back into the tissue lining the blood vessels of the mice from which they came, that graft also took. For at least 40 weeks after the incubated stem cells were returned to their mouse owners, the stem cells continued to regenerate themselves and give rise to many blood-cell types without provoking immune reactions.

In addition to making a workhorse treatment for blood cancers safer, the new advances may afford scientists a unique window on the mechanisms by which blood diseases take hold and progress, said Lee Greenberger, chief scientific officer for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

From a research point of view you could now actually begin to model diseases, said Greenberger. If you were to take the cell thats defective and make it revert to a stem cell, you could effectively reproduce the disease and watch its progression from the earliest stages.

That, in turn, would make it easier to narrow the search for drugs that could disrupt that disease process early. And it would speed the process of discovering which genes are implicated in causing diseases. With gene-editing techniques such as CRISPR-Cas9, those offending genes could one day be snipped out of hematopoietic stem cells, then be returned to their owners to generate new lines of disease-free blood cells.

Read more:
Scientists get closer to making personalized blood cells by using patients’ own stem cells – Los Angeles Times

Rock band encourages fans to become bone marrow donors – ITV.com – ITV News

Welsh rockers The Alarm are using their shows to encourage fans to become bone marrow donors.

The band, who are set to play at the Electric Ballroom in London, on Saturday, have arranged for swabbing station to be set up at the venue.

It means fans will be able to join a bone marrow donor registry with a simple cheek swab.

Leader singer Mike Peters, who has battled cancer three times, co-founded the Love Hope Strength Foundation in 2007 with the aim to “save lives, one concert at a time”.

It hosts donor drives at concerts and festivals around the world by encouraging music fans aged 18 to 55 to sign up to the International Bone Marrow Registry.

To date, more than 150,000 music fans have joined the registry, and more than 3,100 potentially-lifesaving matches for blood cancer patients.

Bone marrow is a soft tissue found in the middle of certain bones. It contains stem cells, which are the “building blocks” for other normal blood cells (like red cells, which carry oxygen, and white cells, which fight infection).

Some diseases, such as leukaemia, prevent people’s bone marrow from working properly. And for certain patients, the only cure is to have a stem cell transplant from a healthy donor.

Peters, 58, from North Wales, was first diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma in 1995. He has also battled leukaemia twice.

He said: “It’s humbling to see how many people have responded to the Get On The List campaign so far.”

Blood cancer charity DKMS, which is the world’s largest donor centre, has worked with the LHS Foundation since 2013.

Joe Hallett, senior donor recruitment manager at the charity, said: “Only one in three people with a blood cancer in the UK and in need of a life-saving blood stem cell transplant will be lucky enough to find a suitable match within their own family.

“Finding a match from a genetically similar person can offer the best treatment, a second chance of life.”

Last updated Fri 19 May 2017

See the original post:
Rock band encourages fans to become bone marrow donors – ITV.com – ITV News

6-year-old thalassemia patient from Punjab meets his stem cell … – Times of India

BENGLURU: Fateh Singh, a six-year-old thalassemia major patient from Amritsar, underwent a bone marrow transplant last May which gave him a new lease of life. A year later, the boy met his saviour, Naval Chaudhary, whose stem cells were used for the procedure. The child was diagnosed with the condition when he was one-and-a-half years old.

On Thursday, the donor and recipient met for the first time. Naval, 28, a professional living in Bengaluru, had registered with DATRI, an unrelated blood stem cell donors registry in 2015. He said: “I was very happy to hear I was a potential match for a patient. But then I was told the donation process had to be done through bone marrow harvesting. Initially, I was a tad hesitant but then I researched the procedure and was counselled by Dr Sunil Bhat, paediatric haemato-oncologist from Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Centre.”

“I realized that saving a life is more important than the type of procedure I had to go through. So I decided to go ahead,” he added.

Read this article:
6-year-old thalassemia patient from Punjab meets his stem cell … – Times of India

Exercise can even burn off fat in bone marrow – Futurity: Research News

Exercise can burn the fat found within bone marrow, according to new research. The work, conducted with mice, offers evidence that this process improves bone quality and increases the amount of bone in a matter of weeks.

The study, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, also suggests obese individualswho often have worse bone qualitymay derive even greater bone health benefits from exercising than their lean counterparts.

One of the main clinical implications of this research is that exercise is not just good, but amazing for bone health, says lead author Maya Styner, a physician and assistant professor of endocrinology and metabolism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In just a very short period of time, we saw that running was building bone significantly in mice.

Although research in mice is not directly translatable to the human condition, the kinds of stem cells that produce bone and fat in mice are the same kind as those that produce bone and fat in humans.

In addition to its implications for obesity and bone health, Styner says the research also could help illuminate some of the factors behind bone degradation associated with conditions like diabetes, arthritis, anorexia, and the use of steroid medications.

I see a lot of patients with poor bone health, and I always talk to them about what a dramatic effect exercise can have on bones, regardless of what the cause of their bone condition is, says Styner. With obesity, it seems that you get even more bone formation from exercise. Our studies of bone biomechanics show that the quality and the strength of the bone is significantly increased with exercise and even more so in the obese exercisers.

Bone marrow coordinates the formation of bone and cartilage while simultaneously churning out blood cells, immune cells, and cancerous cells.

Marrow also produces fat, but the physiological role of bone marrow fat in the bodyand even whether it is beneficial or harmful for ones healthhas remained somewhat mysterious.

Generally, marrow fat has been thought to comprise a special fat reserve that is not used to fuel energy during exercise in the same way other fat stores are used throughout the body during exercise. The new study offers evidence to the contrary.

Styners work also offers fundamental insights on how marrow fat forms and the impact it has on bone health. Previous studies have suggested that a higher amount of marrow fat increases the risk of fractures and other problems.

Theres been intense interest in marrow fat because its highly associated with states of low bone density, but scientists still havent understood its physiologic purpose, says Styner. We know that exercise has a profound effect on fat elsewhere in the body, and we wanted to use exercise as a tool to understand the fat in the marrow.

The researchers performed their experiments in two groups of mice. One group was fed a normal diet (lean mice) and the other received a high-fat diet (obese mice) starting a month after birth. When they were four months old, half the mice in each group were given a running wheel to use whenever they liked for the next six weeks. Because mice like to run, the group with access to a wheel tended to spend a lot of time exercising.

The researchers analyzed the animals body composition, marrow fat, and bone quantity at various points. Predictably, the obese mice started with more fat cells and larger fat cells in their marrow. After exercising for six weeks, both obese and lean mice showed a significant reduction in the overall size of fat cells and the overall amount fat in the marrow. In these respects, the marrow fat of exercising obese mice looked virtually identical to the marrow fat of lean mice, even those that exercised.

Perhaps more surprising was the dramatic difference in the number of fat cells present in the marrow, which showed no change in lean mice but dropped by more than half in obese mice that exercised compared to obese mice that were sedentary. The tests also revealed that exercise improved the thickness of bone, and that this effect was particularly pronounced in obese mice.

According to Styner, all of this points to the conclusion that marrow fat can be burned off through exercise and that this process is good for bones.

Obesity appears to increase a fat depot in the bone, and this depot behaves very much like abdominal and other fat depots, says Styner. Exercise is able to reduce the size of this fat depot and burn it for fuel and at the same time build stronger, larger bones.

The research leaves a few lingering mysteries. A big one is figuring out the exact relationship between burning marrow fat and building better bone. It could be that when fat cells are burned during exercise, the marrow uses the released energy to make more bone. Or, because both fat and bone cells come from parent cells known as mesenchymal stem cells, it could be that exercise somehow stimulates these stem cells to churn out more bone cells and less fat cells.

More research will be needed to parse this out. What we can say is theres a lot of evidence suggesting that marrow fat is being used as fuel to make more bone, rather than there being an increase in the diversion of stem cells into bone, says Styner.

Coauthors of the study are from UNC and State University of New York, Stony Brook. The National Institutes of Health Funded this research.

Source: UNC-Chapel Hill

Read more:
Exercise can even burn off fat in bone marrow – Futurity: Research News

Athlone mother’s desperate search for bone marrow donor for son (3) – Eyewitness News

Athlone mother’s desperate search for bone marrow donor for son (3)

Raqeeb Palm was diagnosed with Aplastic Anaemia in October after his mother noticed unusual bruises on his body.

Three-year-old Raqeeb Palm was diagnosed with Aplastic Anaemia in October after his mother noticed unusual bruises on his body. Picture: Monique Mortlock/EWN.

CAPE TOWN A mother from Heideveld in Athlone is desperately trying to find a bone marrow donor for her three-year-old son.

Raqeeb Palm was diagnosed with Aplastic Anaemia in October after his mother noticed unusual bruises on his body.

The boy had to undergo various blood tests and two bone marrow biopsies over a two-month period, before being diagnosed with the rare disease which damages bone marrow and stem cells.

Zaida Palm says her outgoing child can no longer play outside or do many of the activities three-year-olds enjoy due to his severely weakened immune system.

Hes got practically no immune system. So going out, malls, play areas, doing fun things is on a stop. Because any germ, he gets admitted [to the hospital] for a cold, he needs to go to the hospital.

Palm says they have been unable to find a bone marrow donor in South Africa.

A transplant is her son’s only chance of survival.

Her medical aid won’t cover an investigation for international donors, which is why she’s turned to online crowd-funding.

The hundred thousand on the Backabuddy [website] is just the start to the campaign.

Palm has also urged people to become bone marrow donors.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

– Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality) – Sexism – Homophobia – Religious intolerance – Cyber bullying – Hate speech – Derogatory language – Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

More:
Athlone mother’s desperate search for bone marrow donor for son (3) – Eyewitness News

Bone marrow transplant facility to be available to public, government employees – The News International

Islamabad

The Ministry of National Health Services signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Armed Forces Bone Marrow Transplant Centre here Thursday for provision of bone marrow transplant facility to the general public and federal government employees and their families, along with Armed Forces personnel and their families and defence paid employees.

Under the MOU, the National Institute of Blood and Marrow Transplant shall be established at the Armed Forces Bone Marrow Transplant Centre and will be designated as the National Institute of Blood and Marrow Transplant (NIBMT). This new facility will broaden the scope of the hospital, so that bone marrow/stem cell transplant can be extended to federal government employees and the general public. It will also serve to extend training facilities in the field of Bone Marrow Transplant and Clinical Haematology.

The MOU was signed on behalf of National Health Services by Director General Health Dr. Assad Hafeez whereas Major General Tariq Mehmood Satti Commandant Armed Forces Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, Rawalpindi, signed on behalf of his organization. Commandant of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Maj. Gen. Parvez Ahmed was also present on the occasion.

Speaking on the occasion, the Secretary of the Ministry of Health Services Muhammad Ayub Shaikh expressed gratitude to the Commandant of AFIP and AFBMPC for their efforts in making the MOU possible. This noble initiative will benefit a large number of patients, he projected. Major General Parvez Ahmed elaborated the efforts and initiatives taken to make the MOU possible.

More:
Bone marrow transplant facility to be available to public, government employees – The News International

Blasting tiny bubbles at broken pig bones makes them heal on their own – The Verge

Scientists have healed severe bone fractures in pigs by blasting tiny bubbles with ultrasound in the animals bones. The technique encourages the pigs bodies to regenerate themselves, and could one day be used to help humans especially the elderly heal dangerous bone injuries.

Broken bones are common: you wrap an arm or wrist in a cast and the bone eventually heals on its own. But sometimes, people have nonunion fractures, meaning bones fail to produce new bone tissue and dont heal properly. There are about 100,000 cases of this in the United States every year. One solution is bone grafts, or bone transplants using donated marrow, but this procedure is invasive and there is a risk that the body will reject the marrow. Another solution is to use viruses to deliver bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) that encourage the bodys own stem cells to create more bone marrow. But using a virus can have negative side effects like inflammation.

In a study published today in Science Translational Medicine, scientists healed a 0.4-inch fracture in pigs in eight weeks without invasive surgery. Going from something invasive to something like this that potentially could be an outpatient procedure has been the holy grail in orthopedics, says Edward Schwarz, director of the University of Rochesters Center for Musculoskeletal Research, who was not involved with the study. He adds that, though these nonunion fractures arent the most common health problem, theyre a serious one. People are shocked when I tell them that the life expectancy with a nonunion fracture is shorter than with pancreatic cancer, he says. Were like horses. If we cant get up and walk again, then were done.

In the study, the researchers first caused a 0.4-inch fracture in the shins of 18 minipigs. Then, they inserted a biodegradable scaffolds into the broken shins, says co-author Gadi Pelled, a professor of surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. The scaffold helped support bone stem cells in the area. The scientists let the stem cells migrate and populate over the scaffold for two weeks but that wast enough. The stem cells had to be triggered to actually heal the injury. So the scientists injected microbubbles mixed with bone morphogenetic proteins. Immediately after the injection, they applied ultrasound, which stimulated the BMPs to enter into the stem cells and activate them.

The stem cells then turned into bone cells and healed the fracture after eight weeks. This method doesnt have the side effects associated with using viruses, and the fact that it uses the bodys own stem cells means theres no risk of rejection, says co-author Zulma Gazit, also at Cedars-Sinai. This ultrasound and microbubbles combo has already been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is often used in radiology, so the new technique could be readily approved for use in humans.

Next, says Pelled, the team is studying whether the same technology can also work with tissues like ligaments; they gathering more comprehensive information. Before we move forward into humans, we need to determine that this technology is safe, says Pelled. Theyre hopeful that a clinical trial is on the way.

Read the original post:
Blasting tiny bubbles at broken pig bones makes them heal on their own – The Verge

Ontario teen Jonathan Pitre’s second attempt at stem cell transplant is a success – Cantech Letter

Jonathan Pitre in a 2015 TSN profile.

This time, it worked.

Suffering from a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa (EB), an incurable genetic condition which causes the skin to blister and create painful wounds, Pitre, who turns 17 next month, was given the moniker Butterfly Boy due to his delicate skin.

EB can be fatal, with many people who have severe EB dying from skin cancer in their twenties. Pitre underwent his second stem cell transplant procedure at the University of Minnesota Masonic Childrens Hospital, a pioneer in treating EB though stem cell transplants.

Paediatric hematoligist-oncologist with the University of Minnesota Jakub Tolar calls EB the worst disease youve never heard of, as it affects only one in 20,000 people. Research by Tolar and his colleagues led to the discovery that bone marrow transplantation, a procedure typically used to treat blood cancers in the bone marrow such as leukemia, could benefit those with EB.

This had never been done before, says Tolar, who directs the U of Ms Stem Cell Institute, in a press release. I didnt know it at the time we started this research 10 years ago, but it opened a totally new field in transplantation biology.

Stem cell transplants involve a persons blood-forming stem cells (immature cells that can become various types of specialized cells in the body, in this case, becoming different types of blood cells) from the bone marrow and replacing them with healthy stem cells.

For Pitre, his earlier bone marrow transplant last October proved unsuccessful as doctors learned that his own stem cells had recolonized his bone marrow. This time around, the results look more promising. Pitres mother, Tina Boileau, who was the donor, is now full of joy and relief, according to an Ottawa Citizen report, which states that newly created white blood cells in Pitres system contain a pair of X chromosomes, indicating that they came from Boileaus donated cells.

This is the best news ever, the best Mothers Day gift, said Boileau. Jon is full of me. He doesnt have any T-cells that are his.

Its been over 30 years since bone marrow cells were first used to treat cancer, but recent advances have shown the potential application of stem cell transplantation for a variety of diseases and conditions, from brain and spinal cord injury to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimers to HIV/AIDS. Researchers at Cardiff University in Wales, for example, have just announced commencement of stem cell transplants for patients with Huntingtons disease.

The Ontario government has just announced $32 million in new funding to help shorten the long wait times for stem cell transplants in the province, meaning that 150 more patients a year will be able to receive transplant therapy. As reported in the Hamilton Spectator, $10 million of the new funds will be going to the Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre in Hamilton for a dedicated unit with 15 inpatient and five outpatient beds.

Below: TSN Original: The Butterfly Child

See the article here:
Ontario teen Jonathan Pitre’s second attempt at stem cell transplant is a success – Cantech Letter

Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat a key to better bone health – Science Daily


Science Daily
Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat a key to better bone health
Science Daily
It could be that when fat cells are burned during exercise, the marrow uses the released energy to make more bone. Or, because both fat and bone cells come from parent cells known as mesenchymal stem cells, it could be that exercise somehow stimulates …

and more »

Originally posted here:
Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat a key to better bone health – Science Daily

Human blood stem cells grown in the lab for the first time – New Scientist

Potential for a new supply line

Burger/Phanie/REX/Shutterstock

By Jessica Hamzelou

The stem cells that produce our blood have been created in the lab for the first time. These could one day be used to treat people who have blood diseases and leukaemia with their own cells, rather than bone marrow transplants from a donor. They could also be used to create blood for transfusions.

This is a very big deal, says Carolina Guibentif at the University of Cambridge, who was not involved in the research. If you can develop [these cells] in the lab in a safe way and in high enough numbers, you wouldnt be dependent on donors.

In a healthy adult, blood stem cells are found in bone marrow, where they replenish the supply of red and white blood cells and platelets. They are sort of master cells, says George Daley at Harvard Medical School.

When these cells dont work properly, they fail to maintain an adequate supply of blood cells. As a result, not enough oxygen reaches the bodys tissues. This can cause serious disease if organs such as the heart are affected. Blood stem cells can also be wiped out by chemotherapy for leukaemia and other cancers.

People with these disorders tend to be treated with bone marrow complete with blood stem cells from a healthy donor. The difficulty is finding a match. There is a one in four chance of achieving this from a healthy sibling, but the odds are slashed to one in a million if a stranger needs to be found, says Daley.

In an attempt to create blood stem cells in the lab, Daley and his colleagues started with human pluripotent stem cells which have the potential to form almost any other type of body cell.

The team then searched for chemicals that might encourage these to become blood stem cells.

After studying the genes involved in blood production, the researchers identified proteins that control these genes and applied them to their stem cells.

They tested many combinations of the proteins, and found five that worked together to encourage their stem cells to become blood stem cells. When they put these into mice, they went on to produce new red and white blood cells and platelets. Its very cool, says Daley. Were very excited about the results.

A separate team has achieved the same feat with stem cells taken from adult mice. Raphael Lis at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York and his colleagues started with cells taken from the walls of the animals lungs, based on the idea that similar cells in an embryo eventually form the bodys first blood stem cells. The team identified a set of four factors that could encourage these lung stem cells to make them.

Both sets of results represent a breakthrough, says Guibentif. This is something people have been trying to achieve for a long time, she says. By working with adult mouse epithelial cells, Lis and his team show that the feat could potentially be achieved with cells taken from an adult person. Daleys team used human stem cells that could in theory be made from skin cells, bolstering the prospect that lab-made human blood could be next.

The lab-made stem cells are not quite ready to be used in people just yet, says Daley. Although all of his mice were healthy throughout the experiments, there is a risk that the cells could mutate and cause cancer. And the cells are not quite as efficient at making blood as those found in the body.

But once Daley and his team have honed their procedure, they might be able to make platelets and red blood cells for hospital use. These cell types dont have a nucleus, so are unable to divide and potentially cause cancer. He hopes this procedure could be used within the next couple of years.

Eventually, Daley hopes his cells could be used to create whole blood suitable for transfusions. Not only would such a supply be more reliable than that from donors, but it would also be free of disease. When new pathogens like Zika pop up, you have to make sure that blood is safe, says Daley. Wed be able to have more quality control.

Journal references: Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature22326; Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature22370

Read more: Synthetic bone implant can make blood cells in its marrow; Lab-grown blood given to volunteer for the first time

More on these topics:

Go here to see the original:
Human blood stem cells grown in the lab for the first time – New Scientist

Press Release: New Stem Cell Collection Center Opens in Boston – The Scientist

Press Release: New Stem Cell Collection Center Opens in Boston
The Scientist
We support biomedical researchers globally by offering human hematopoietic stem cells and blood derived cell products from bone marrow, cord blood, peripheral blood and mobilized peripheral blood. StemExpress guarantees every sample delivers only …

See the rest here:
Press Release: New Stem Cell Collection Center Opens in Boston – The Scientist

‘Incredibly strong and brave’ Albury girl, 3, recovering after stem cell transplant to cure cancer – Hertfordshire Mercury

Comments(0)

An ‘incredibly strong and brave’ three-year-old is on the road to recovery after having a stem cell transplant to cure her rare form of cancer.

Hazel Richardson, who lives in the village of Albury near Bishop’s Stortford, was diagnosed with Juvenile Myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) in 2015.

She had her second stem cell transplant at Great Ormond Street Hospital in September 2016 after a donor in Germany was found.

Hazel’s aunt, Jemma MacFadyen said: “Hazel is such a little character, so strong and brave and cheeky. She turned three in April, but she thinks she is four.

“She was incredibly strong and brave, I think it was much harder for her parents. She was very strong.

“She was diagnosed with an incredibly rare form of leukaemia in November 2015, while her mum Alice was in Addenbrooke’s Hospital having a baby.

“There did not appear to be anything that wrong with Hazel, but her mum knew that something was not right.

“She was a bit floppy and kept getting these temperatures and she also had spots on her face, which we now know is quite characteristic of JMML, but at the time did not seem like anything.”

READ MORE: Cheshunt boy with cerebral palsy takes first steps after potentially life-changing 75,000 operation

Hazel had her first stem cell transplant in April of last year, but unfortunately it did not take and her disease returned.

Mrs MacFadyen explained: “The only treatment for JMML is a bone marrow transplant, or stem cell transplant as it is known now.

“Hazel had her first transplant at Great Ormond Street Hospital in April last year.

“How it works is they gave her a very strong dose of chemotherapy, then they attach a drip with the transplant.

“It did not work and quickly she began relapsing even before she left Great Ormond Street.”

Fortunately the blood cancer charity Anthony Nolan managed to find Hazel another donor, one with an even higher match percentage.

Mrs Facfadyen said: “JMML is very, very rare, Addenbrooke’s said they have only had six or seven patients who have had the disease.

“Anthony Nolan, who have the register for donors, found another match for Hazel. He was German and was a nine out of ten match, which was better than the first one.

“So far this one has helped. We are hopeful that this has been more successful than the first one.

“They say if it comes back it comes back quickly and very hard. So every day is a day away from where we were.

“All donors make their donations in their home countries then an Anthony Nolan courier brings the stem cells over. It is all very secretive.

“When two years elapses after the transplant you can meet with the donor, if they want to, and I think this is what the family is planning on doing.”

Hazel has recently started to go to Albury Acorns pre-school, and the Furnuex Pelham Church of England School is planning to donate some of the money raised from the Felham Fayre on June 25 to Anthony Nolan.

In the future Hazel’s family hopes to raise money for the charity themselves according to Mrs Macfadyen.

She said: “We definitely want to do some fundraising for Anthony Nolan, something big.

“We want to be sure and we want to now as a family that we can handle it because we have just come out of a difficult time.”

NEXT STORY: Cheshunt seven-year-old comes through life-changing 75,000 operation

See the original post here:
‘Incredibly strong and brave’ Albury girl, 3, recovering after stem cell transplant to cure cancer – Hertfordshire Mercury

CytoDyn Treats First Patient with PRO 140 in Phase 2 Trial for Graft versus Host Disease – GlobeNewswire (press release)

May 17, 2017 06:00 ET | Source: CytoDyn Inc.

VANCOUVER, Washington, May 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — CytoDyn Inc. (OTC.QB:CYDY), a biotechnology company focused on the development of new therapies for combating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, announces the treatment of the first patient in its Phase 2 clinical trial for Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD), its leading immunologic indication for PRO 140.

GvHD is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients requiring a bone marrow transplant because their immune systems have been depleted during aggressive cancer therapy for certain types of leukemia. These patients have a 40-60% one-year survival rate, with relapsed GvHD as the leading causes of death.

The multicenter, 60-patient Phase 2 trial will evaluate the safety and efficacy of PRO 140 with an equal number of patients receiving PRO 140 and placebo. The trial is supported by study data using a xeno-GvHD animal model where human bone marrow stem cells were administered to immunocompromised mice, which leads to severe GvHD culminating in death. PRO 140 at a comparable dose to that being employed in CytoDyns Phase 2 trial completely eliminated any signs of GvHD in these mice. Effects of stem cell engraftment was apparent in blood, spleen and bone marrow of the mice without signs of GvHD. This preclinical study is being submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in support of CytoDyns Orphan Drug Designation application and publication of this data is forthcoming.

We selected the transplantation indication called GvHD as our first expansion of PRO 140 into a non-HIV clinical indication because it targets the CCR5 receptor, which is known to be an important mediator of GvHD, especially in the organ damage that is the usual cause of death, said Denis R. Burger, Ph.D., CytoDyns Chief Science Officer. We plan to explore additional opportunities to expand the clinical applications of PRO 140 to those indications where CCR5 plays an important role, namely certain autoimmune diseases and cancer.

If CytoDynreceives positive results from this Phase 2 study, the Companyexpects to file for Breakthrough Designation with the FDA to expedite the commercialization of PRO 140 for this clinical indication. As previously reported, PRO 140 is considered safe and well tolerated with negligible toxicities or side effects. The Company believes these attributes make it promising for the treatment of GvHD.

About Graft versus Host Disease GvHD occurs after a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in which an individual receives bone marrow tissue or cells from a donor, known as allogeneic transplant.The transplanted cells regard the recipient’s body as foreign and attack the recipient’s body. GvHD does not occur when an individual receives his or her own cells during a transplant. Before a transplant, tissue and cells from possible donors are tested to determine how closely they match the person having the transplant with GvHD is less likely to occur, or symptoms to be milder, when the match is close. The chance of GvHD can be between 30% and 40% when the donor and recipient are related and 60% to 80% when the donor and recipient are not related. There are two types of GvHD: acute and chronic. Symptoms in both acute and chronic GvHD range from mild to severe. Acute GvHD usually occurs within the firstthree months after a transplant. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, nearly 5,000 allogeneic transplants were performed in the U.S. in 2016.

About CytoDyn CytoDyn is a biotechnology company focused on the clinical development and potential commercialization of humanized monoclonal antibodies for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. The Company has one of the leading monoclonal antibodies under development for HIV infection, PRO 140, which has completed Phase 2 clinical trials with demonstrated antiviral activity in man and is currently in Phase 3. PRO 140 blocks the HIV co-receptor CCR5 on T cells, which prevents viral entry. Clinical trial results thus far indicate that PRO 140 does not negatively affect the normal immune functions that are mediated by CCR5. Results from seven Phase 1 and Phase 2 human clinical trials have shown that PRO 140 can significantly reduce viral burden in people infected with HIV. A recent Phase 2b clinical trial demonstrated that PRO 140 can prevent viral escape in patients during several months of interruption from conventional drug therapy. CytoDyn intends to continue to develop PRO 140 as a therapeutic anti-viral agent in persons infected with HIV and to pursue non-HIV indications where CCR5 and its ligand CCL5 may be involved. For more information on the Company, please visit http://www.cytodyn.com.

About PRO 140 PRO 140 belongs to a new class of HIV/AIDS therapeutics viral-entry inhibitors that are intended to protect healthy cells from viral infection. PRO 140 is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody directed against CCR5, a molecular portal that HIV uses to enter T-cells. PRO 140 blocks the predominant HIV (R5) subtype entry into T-cells by masking this required co-receptor, CCR5. Importantly, PRO 140 does not appear to interfere with the normal function of CCR5 in mediating immune responses. PRO 140 does not have agonist activity toward CCR5 but does have antagonist activity to CCL5, which is a central mediator in inflammatory diseases. PRO 140 has been the subject of seven clinical trials, each demonstrating efficacy by significantly reducing or controlling HIV viral load in human test subjects. PRO 140 has been designated a fast track product by the FDA. The PRO 140 antibody appears to be a powerful antiviral agent leading to potentially fewer side effects and less frequent dosing requirements as compared to daily drug therapies currently in use.

Forward-Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements and forward-looking information within the meaning of United States securities laws, including statements regarding CytoDyns current and proposed trials and studies and their results, costs and completion. These statements and information represent CytoDyns intentions, plans, expectations, and beliefs and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors, many beyond CytoDyns control. These factors could cause actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements or information. The words believe, estimate, expect, intend, attempt, anticipate, foresee, plan, and similar expressions and variations thereof identify certain of such forward-looking statements or forward-looking information, which speak only as of the date on which they are made.

CytoDyn disclaims any intention or obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements or forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements or forward-looking information. While it is impossible to identify or predict all such matters, these differences may result from, among other things, the inherent uncertainty of the timing and success of and expense associated with research, development, regulatory approval, and commercialization of CytoDyns products and product candidates, including the risks that clinical trials will not commence or proceed as planned; products appearing promising in early trials will not demonstrate efficacy or safety in larger-scale trials; future clinical trial data on CytoDyns products and product candidates will be unfavorable; funding for additional clinical trials may not be available; CytoDyns products may not receive marketing approval from regulators or, if approved, may fail to gain sufficient market acceptance to justify development and commercialization costs; competing products currently on the market or in development may reduce the commercial potential of CytoDyns products; CytoDyn, its collaborators or others may identify side effects after the product is on the market; or efficacy or safety concerns regarding marketed products, whether or not scientifically justified, may lead to product recalls, withdrawals of marketing approval, reformulation of the product, additional preclinical testing or clinical trials, changes in labeling of the product, the need for additional marketing applications, or other adverse events.

CytoDyn is also subject to additional risks and uncertainties, including risks associated with the actions of its corporate, academic, and other collaborators and government regulatory agencies; risks from market forces and trends; potential product liability; intellectual property litigation; environmental and other risks; and risks that current and pending patent protection for its products may be invalid, unenforceable, or challenged or fail to provide adequate market exclusivity. There are also substantial risks arising out of CytoDyns need to raise additional capital to develop its products and satisfy its financial obligations; the highly regulated nature of its business, including government cost-containment initiatives and restrictions on third-party payments for its products; the highly competitive nature of its industry; and other factors set forth in CytoDyns Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2016 and other reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Related Articles

View post:
CytoDyn Treats First Patient with PRO 140 in Phase 2 Trial for Graft versus Host Disease – GlobeNewswire (press release)

It worked! Jonathan Pitre’s transplant takes root – Ottawa Citizen

Mom, we did it.

With those words, Jonathan Pitre hugged his mother, Tina Boileau, and shared his joy and relief at learning the news late Tuesday afternoon that his stem cell transplant has worked.

Blood tests revealed that all of the new white cells in his bloodstream are from his mothers donated stem cells, and contain her two telltale X chromosomes. It means his mothers donated stem cells have taken root in his bone marrow and have started to produce new blood cells.

This is the best news ever, the best Mothers Day gift, said an elated Boileau, who has remained at her sons side throughout his marathon treatment for epidermolysis bullosa, a rare and painful disease that causes his skin to blister and tear easily.

Jonathan Pitre rests in bed, his pillow with his Boston terrier, Gibson, on it close by. Tina Boileau / –

Oftentimes, doctors find a mix of white blood cells, from the donor and patient, soon after a stem cell transplant. But in Pitres case, all of the new white blood cells, 100 per cent, were donor cells.

Jon is full of me, said Boileau. He doesnt have any T-cells that are his.

Pitre, who turns 17 next month, was allowed out of his room for the first time Tuesday since his April 13 transplant when he was infused with stem cells drawn from his mothers hip bone. His infection-fighting white blood cells are now numerous enough his count hit 1.0 on Tuesday that he was allowed to emerge from medical isolation.

We celebrated our good news by going for a walk in the hallway, Boileau said.

Pitre has been in Minnesota since mid-February to undergo his second attempt at the experimental treatment pioneered by doctors at the University of Minnesota Masonic Childrens Hospital.His first transplant ended in disappointment on Thanksgiving Day last year, but the family opted to undergo a second transplant, despite its risks and hardships.

This time, wonderfully, it worked.

I just got official results: Jon is 100 per cent donor! Boileau said in a text message late Tuesday afternoon.

Offered to children and adolescents with severe EB as part of a clinical trial, the stem cell transplant is physically demanding and comes with a host of life-threatening side effects. One of those potential side effects is graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a complication in which the new white blood cells turn on the patients tissues and attack them as foreign.

BACKGROUND:Butterfly child dreams of the Northern Lights

Pitre has suffered infections, fevers and profound exhaustion ever since his transplant while battling to get his pain levels under control. Doctors will now be on guard for signs of GVHD.

A Grade 11 student from Russell, Pitre suffers from a rare form of EB that complicates how he moves, eats, bathes and sleeps. Many of those with severe EB die from an aggressive form of skin cancer in their 20s.

The stem cell transplant holds the potential to dramatically improve Pitres life and produce tougher skin that blisters less and heals more readily.

Link:
It worked! Jonathan Pitre’s transplant takes root – Ottawa Citizen

Engineered bone marrow could make transplants safer – Science Daily


Science Daily
Engineered bone marrow could make transplants safer
Science Daily
Bone marrow transplants are used to treat patients with bone marrow disease. Before a transplant, a patient is first given doses of radiation, sometimes in combination with drugs, to kill off any existing stem cells in the patient's bone marrow. This
Engineered Bone Marrow Improves Transplant SafetyR & D Magazine
Engineered bone marrow may ease transplantsThe San Diego Union-Tribune

all 4 news articles »

Follow this link:
Engineered bone marrow could make transplants safer – Science Daily

New Discovery Could Soon Replace The Painful Bone Marrow … – Wall Street Pit

Patients dealing with blood and immune disorders, especially those in the most advanced stages, often have no choice but to undergo bone marrow transplants. Ironically, even if the treatment can be life-saving, it would only work when the bone marrow cells of the recipients are completely eliminated using drugs and radiation. And this could cause serious negative side effects such as organ damage, cataracts, infertility, new cancers, and even death.

Thanks to the work of engineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), that kind of bone marrow transplant may soon be rendered obsolete. Rather than using a live bone marrow from a compatible donor or from the patients themselves, a synthetic bone implant will instead be used and such will not require the use of drugs that can cause all those harmful side effects.

Bone marrow is the flexible tissue inside the bones that is responsible for producing red blood cells from stem cells. If, for some reason, the bone marrow fails to do its job, the result can either be severe anemia or an impaired immune system. Whichever of these conditions arise, the most effective treatment is typically a bone marrow transplant.

To reduce the undesirable side effects caused by traditional bone marrow transplants, the UCSD team of bioengineers led by Shyni Varghese have developed a synthetic bone implant with a practical marrow that can produce its own blood cells. The implant is divided into two sections, both of which are engineered from a hydrogel matrix. The exterior layer containing calcium phosphate minerals functions as a bone, while the interior layer contains donor stem cells for bone marrow growth. The exterior layer works together with the hosts cells to assist in bone building, merging the implant with the natural structure of the body.

According to the team, they have tested their engineered implant in mice, and the tests proved successful. Specifically, they implanted the synthetic bone under the skin of mice, some of which had functional bone marrow, and some of which had defective bone marrow due to radiation.

Within a four-week observation period, the implant developed bone-like structures that didnt only have blood vessels, but also marrow that actually produced red blood cells. And after six months, the synthetic implants and the bloodstream of the mice showed a mix of blood cells from both the donor and the host. This shows that the implants can function as natural bones, with the blood cells produced by the synthetic implant naturally circulating within the hosts bloodstream without being rejected.

As promising as those results are, however, there is no guarantee that the technique will be as effective in humans. Further study will be required before it can be accepted and approved by the FDA.

Theres also the matter of the treatment only being effective on patients with non-malignant bone marrow disorders. The implant cannot do anything to stop or prevent cancerous mutation from spreading, which means when it comes to cancer patients, undergoing radiation therapy will still be required to kill off their cancer cells, before a bone marrow transplant can work.

Nevertheless, this is still considered a step forward and an exciting development, particularly for individuals suffering from blood disorders. Not only will the treatment ease their pain and distress because theyll be free of their disease; it will also keep them from suffering negative side effects.

The research was recently published in the journal PNAS.

Originally posted here:
New Discovery Could Soon Replace The Painful Bone Marrow … – Wall Street Pit

Archives