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Archive for the ‘Hypogonadism’ Category

The Ball’s In Your Court – Lexology (registration)

Defenders should seize the opportunity to seek assertive case management of complex negligence claims, following Lord Glennies comments in JD v Lothian Health Board [2017] CSIH 27.

JD, a party litigant, sued Lothian Health Board in the Court of Session. He alleged his consultant negligently misdiagnosed him with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, a condition where a lack of testosterone causes small testicles, abnormal body appearance and sexual dysfunction. The Health Board took the case to debate, arguing JDs case was legally irrelevant. He made no relevant allegations of breach of duty; he had not offered to prove the cause of his low testosterone; and he claimed only for emotional upset. Without any physical injury, emotional distress not amounting to a psychiatric condition does not sound in damages.

At first instance, the court agreed with the Health Board and dismissed the case.

JD appealed to the Inner House and his case came before Lord Brodie, Lady Clark and Lord Glennie. He argued that he had an independent medical expert, a Dr Quinton, who agreed he had been misdiagnosed and was willing to speak to the court.

The Inner House examined JDs written case closely. He had quoted Dr Quinton as saying, I could show a photo of your testicles to every expert around the world and not one of them would diagnose you with hypogonadism. Affording JD some considerable leeway as a party litigant, all three judges were satisfied he had said enough to make a relevant case under Hunter v Hanley. They considered Dr Quintons quote could be construed as meaning no reasonable doctor would diagnose hypogonadism if acting with reasonable skill and care.

However, the appeal was dismissed by a 2-1 majority. Lord Brodie and Lady Clark agreed that, as JD claimed only for emotional upset, he had failed to show any recoverable loss and therefore his claim was irrelevant. Lord Glennie disagreed. He found that, as the emotional upset arose from continued abnormal bodily appearance and sexual dysfunction, there had been physical injury and the loss was relevant. He would have allowed the appeal and sent the case back for a case management hearing.

Lord Glennie, supported by Lady Clark, also stressed a wider need for pro-active case management. He observed the rules under Chapter 42A afford judges wide-ranging case management powers in complex negligence claims. Before allowing a case to go to proof, the judge must consider whether there is a relevant case supported by expert evidence, and likewise a relevant and supported defence. If not, the judge can make orders for the pursuer (or defender) to provide further specification and lodge expert reports. If a party failed to comply, the other could seek decree in default. Lord Glennie also reminded parties that, where a claim for professional negligence is not supported by an expert report, the court has an inherent power to dismiss it as an abuse of process.

Case management orders provide a real opportunity for defenders. The smart defender will scrutinise the pursuers pleadings early and, where they are found wanting, attend case management hearings armed with a shopping list of points for further specification. Where expert reports are inadequate or missing altogether, the savvy defender will highlight this and seek orders for adequate reports to be lodged within a reasonable time. If the pursuer does not comply, they may face decree in default. For the defender, this is an attractive alternative to the traditional route of a protracted and costly debate.

Not every judge will be as proactive, but Lord Glennies comments are an open invitation to defenders to make better use of the courts powers through assertive case management. If JD had been ordered to produce Dr Quintons report, perhaps his case would have been resolved at a much earlier stage, avoiding great public expense.

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The Ball’s In Your Court – Lexology (registration)

Hypogonadism Hormone Health Network

March 2012

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Additional Resources American Urological Association Foundation

What is the role of testosterone in mens health?

Testosterone is the most important sex hormone that men have. It is responsible for the typical male characteristics, such as facial, pubic, and body hair as well as muscle. This hormone also helps maintain sex drive, sperm production, and bone health. The brain and pituitary gland (a small gland at the base of the brain) control the production of testosterone by the testes.

In the short term, low testosterone (also called hypogonadism) can cause

Over time, low testosterone may cause a man to lose body hair, muscle bulk, and strength and to gain body fat. Chronic (long-term) low testosterone may also cause weak bones (osteoporosis), mood changes, less energy, and smaller testes. Signs and symptoms (what you see and feel) vary from person to person.

What causes low testosterone?

Low testosterone can result from

Low testosterone is common in older men. In many cases, the cause is not known.

How is low testosterone diagnosed?

During a physical exam, your doctor will examine your body hair, size of your breasts and penis, and the size and consistency of the testes and scrotum. Your doctor may check for loss of side vision, which could indicate a pituitary tumor, a rare cause of low testosterone.

Your doctor will also use blood tests to see if your total testosterone level is low. The normal range is generally 300 to 1,000 ng/dL, but this depends on the lab that conducts the test. To get a diagnosis of low testosterone, you may need more than one early morning (710 AM) blood test and, sometimes, tests of pituitary gland hormones.

If you have symptoms of low testosterone, your doctor may suggest that you talk with an endocrinologist. This expert in hormones can help find the cause. Be open with your doctor about your medical history, all prescription and nonprescription drugs you are now taking, sexual problems, and any major changes in your life.

How is low testosterone treated?

Testosterone replacement therapy can improve sexual interest, erections, mood and energy, body hair growth, bone density, and muscle mass. There are several ways to replace testosterone:

The best method will depend on your preference and tolerance, and the cost.

There are risks with long-term use of testosterone. The most serious possible risk is prostate cancer. African American men, men over 40 years of age who have close relatives with prostate cancer, and all men over 50 years of age need monitoring for prostate cancer during testosterone treatment. Men with known or suspected prostate cancer, or with breast cancer, should not receive testosterone treatment.

Other possible risks of testosterone treatment include

Questions to ask your doctor

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Hypogonadism Hormone Health Network

AUA 2017: Calculated Free T and T:E Ratio but not Total Testosterone and Estradiol Predict Low Libido – UroToday

Boston, MA (UroToday.com) Libido is thought to be influenced by hormonal milieu, particularly testosterone. The knowledge about the role of estradiol in male sexual function has been found to be more important than originally thought. The estradiol cut-off point of 5 ng/dL in hypogonadal men is thought to directly affect libido. Dr. Gupta presented a study assessing the impact of sex hormones on libido specifically in a cardiac patient population.

The study focused on 200 men in a cardiology practice who completed the IIEF-15, ADAM, and previous ED treatment questionnaires. Additionally all patients had serum total testosterone (T), estradiol (E), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels measured via morning lab draws. Their free testosterone (CFT) was calculated using an online ISSM calculator. Patients that were diagnosed for hypogonadism in the past or who were currently on medications possibly affecting T levels were excluded. Hormonal levels were correlated to responses to the IIEF questions 11 and 12 (IIEF11, IIEF12), focusing on libido.

Results demonstrated the mean total T level to be 310 ng/dL with CFT of 5.4 ng/dL. Mean E levels were 4.4 ng/dL and mean T:E ratio was 8.2. Importantly, 55% of patients had T levels less than 300 ng/dL and 74% of patients had a CFT

In summary, CFT and T:E ratio were predictive of positive libido response on IIEF11 & 12 questions in the IIEF questionnaire. Estradiol, even at a cutoff of 5 ng/dL, was not independently associated with improved libido. Surprisingly, no correlation was found between total testosterone and IIEF11 (desire frequency). The effect of testosterone and estradiol on libido requires further research with prospective studies.

Presented By: Nikhil Gupta, Springfield, IL

Written By: Hanan Goldberg, MD, Urologic Oncology Fellow (SUO), University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

at the 2017 AUA Annual Meeting – May 12 – 16, 2017 Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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AUA 2017: Calculated Free T and T:E Ratio but not Total Testosterone and Estradiol Predict Low Libido – UroToday

AUA 2017: Prevalence of Hormonal Abnormalities in Young Men with Erectile Dysfunction – UroToday

Boston, MA (UroToday.com) The risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) increases with age and typically occurs in middle and older aged men. Dr. Mazur presented a study on young men referred with ED with symptoms of low testosterone. The authors aimed to describe the hormonal profiles of young men with the chief complaint of ED, hypothesizing that the majority of young men with ED will have normal hormonal evaluations.

This was a retrospective single center study of men aged 18-40 years who presented with the complaint of ED and had a hormonal evaluation from 2002- 2016 at a tertiary care institution. Data on demographics, co-morbidities, medications, and hormonal evaluations was obtained for all patients. Hypogonadism was defined as a testosterone level 13.1 ng/mL.

A total of 2,292 relevant men were identified. The median age was 32.7 years with a larger proportion complaining of ED as they neared age 40 compared to younger ages. 43% of men were White, 8.6% Black, 4% Asian, 0.9% Hispanic, and 43.6% other or unknown. Median BMI was 26.8. Some of the men took medication on a regular basis that have been linked to ED including anti-hypertensives, antihistamines, and H2-receptor antagonists. The average total testosterone level was 368 160 ng/dL. 10.6% of men had hypogonadism and 8.5% of men had hyperprolactinemia. Abnormalities of LH and FSH were noted in 10% and 9.1% of men, respectively. Regarding their ED treatment, 68.7% of men were given a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) and 2.4% were given alprostadil. Lastly, 12.9% of men were started on testosterone therapy.

The majority of men under age 40 with ED exhibit a normal hormonal milieu. Additionally, many men were using medications that have been linked to ED. Most men with ED were treated with a PDE5i.

Presented By: Daniel J. Mazur, Chicago, IL

Written By: Hanan Goldberg, MD, Urologic Oncology Fellow (SUO), University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

at the 2017 AUA Annual Meeting – May 12 – 16, 2017 Boston, Massachusetts, USA

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AUA 2017: Prevalence of Hormonal Abnormalities in Young Men with Erectile Dysfunction – UroToday

Hypogonadism Treatment & Management: Approach …

In prepubertal patients with hypogonadism, treatment is directed at initiating pubertal development at the appropriate age. Age of therapy initiation takes into account the patient’s psychosocial needs, current growth, and growth potential. Treatment entails hormonal replacement therapy with sex steroids, ie,estrogen for females and testosterone for males.

Introduction of sex steroids in such cases startswith the use ofsmall, escalating doses over a period of a couple of years. In females, introduction of puberty can begin with administration of small doses of estrogen given either orally or transdermally. One traditional regimen uses conjugated estrogen startingat doses as low as 0.15 mg daily and titrating upwards in 6-12 month intervals to typically 0.625 mg daily, at which point menses can be induced with the introduction of a progestin. Alternatively, transdermal 17-estradiol (0.08 to 0.12 mcg estradiol/kg) can be used.

In boys, introduction of puberty is achieved with the use of testosterone, administered intramuscularly or transdermally (in the form of a patch or gel). A typical regimen involves testosterone enanthate injections 50 mg monthly, titrating up to 200-250 mg every 2 weeks, which is a typical adult replacement dose. Adult testosterone dose can be adjusted to maintain serum testosterone concentrations in the normal adult range.

Therapy with sexsteroid replacement ensures development of secondary sexual characteristics and maintenance of normal sexual function. In patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, fertility is not possible. However, patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism have fertilitypotential,although therapy with sex steroids does not confer fertility or stimulate testicular growth in men.An alternative for men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been treatment with pulsatile LHRH or hCG, either of which can stimulate testicular growth and spermatogenesis.

Because such treatment is more complex than testosterone replacement, and because treatment with testosterone does not interfere with later therapy to induce fertility, most male patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism prefer to initiate and maintain virilization with testosterone.At a time when fertility is desired, it may be induced with either pulsatile LHRH or (more commonly) with a schedule of injections of hCG and FSH. Similarly, fertility can be achieved in females with pulsatile LHRH or exogenous gonadotropin. Such therapy results in ovulation in 95% of women.

A phase III, multicenter, open-label, single-arm trial by Nieschlag et al indicated that corifollitropin-alfa therapy combined with hCG treatment can significantly increase testicular volume and induce spermatogenesis in adult males with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism whose azoospermia could not be cured by hCG treatment alone. Patients in the study who remained azoospermic, though with normalized testosterone levels, after 16 weeks of hCG treatment underwent 52 weeks of twice-weekly hCG therapy along with every-other-week corifollitropin-alfa treatment (150 g). Mean testicular volume in these patients rose from 8.6 mL to 17.8 mL, while spermatogenesis was induced in more than 75% of subjects. [9]

The use of oral testosterone preparations, such as 17-alkylated androgens (eg, methyltestosterone), is discouraged because of liver toxicity. However, oral testosterone undecanoate is available in some countriesand is now approved in the United States. Intramuscular testosterone is available as testosterone enanthate or cypionate. Transdermal testosterone can be administered either in the form of a patch or gel. A nasal testosterone replacement therapy has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for adult males with conditions such as primary hypogonadism (congenital or acquired) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (congenital or acquired) resulting from a deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone. [10] The recommended dosage is 33 mg/day in three divided doses. The drug has not been approved for males younger than 18 years.

For older men with testosterone deficiency, a review by the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) found that the evidence concerning the risk of serious cardiovascular side effects from the use of testosterone in men with hypogonadism was inconsistent. [11, 12] The PRAC determined that the benefits of testosterone outweigh its risks but stressed that testosterone-containing medicines should be used only when lack of testosterone has been confirmed by signs and symptoms, as well as by laboratory tests. However,a literature review by Albert and Morley indicated that testosterone supplementation in males aged 65 years or older may increase the risk of cardiovascular events, particularly during the first year of treatment, althoughintramuscular testosterone seemed to carry less risk than other forms. [13]

On the other hand,a study by Traish et al suggested that long-term testosterone therapy in men with hypogonadism significantly reduces cardiovascular diseaserelated mortality. Patients in the studys testosterone-treated group (n=360) underwent therapy for up to 10 years, with median follow-up being 7 years. The investigators found no cardiovascular eventrelated deaths in the treated patients, compared with 19 such deaths in the group that received no testosterone therapy (n=296). According to the study, mortality in the testosterone-treated patients was reduced by an estimated 66-92%. [14]

The latest Endocrine Society clinical practice guidelines suggest testosterone therapy for men receiving high doses of glucocorticoids who also have low testosterone levels, to promote bone health. The guidelines also suggest such therapy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected men with low testosterone levels, to maintain lean bone mass and muscle strength.

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Hypogonadism Treatment & Management: Approach …

AUA 2017: The Effect of Shift Work on a Man’s Sexual and Urologic Health – UroToday

Boston, MA, May 13, 2017 (UroToday.com) A series of studies evaluating the relationship between shift work,sleep disorders and a mans urologic health will be presented at a special press conferenceduring the 112th Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA). Howard L. Adler,MD, clinical associate professor of urology and medical director of the prostate care program atStony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, will moderate the session, which will take place onSaturday, May 13 at 10:30 a.m. in the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center in Boston, MA. Shift work is known for having unique demands that set it apart from other jobs with traditionaldaytime working hours. It is also known for having such benefits as better pay or theconvenience of not needing child care; however, new studies show the downside to men whoregularly work hours outside of a 7 am. 6 p.m. workday may include an increased risk ofhypogonadal or low-T symptoms, altered semen parameters (e.g., sperm count, motility) andincreased lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

Study Details

Shift Workers with Shift Work Sleep Disorder Have Increased Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms(#MP13-12): Previous studies suggest non-standard male shift workers have an increased risk ofLUTS, which can include frequency or urgency of urination, reduced urine flow, painful urinationor a sensation of incomplete emptying. They also suggest these workers are at an increased riskfor developing shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), a primary circadian rhythm disorder thatdisrupts the bodys internal clock. Utilizing questionnaires from men who presented to a singleandrology clinic between July 2014 and September 2016, researchers set out to examine theassociation between SWSD and LUTS in shift workers. The study population included 2,487 men,of whom 37 percent were diagnosed with SWSD. Each participants work schedule, SWSD riskand LUTS (International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) were examined. The impact of nonstandardshift work and SWSD on IPSS score was also assessed using ANOVA and linearregression.

Results showed:

Shift workers diagnosed with SWSD have worse LUTS than those without SWSD. Poor sleep habits, rather than shift work itself, contribute to worse LUTS. Modifying work and sleep schedules may reduce risk for SWSD and subsequent LUTS.

Study Details

Increased Risk of Hypogonadal Symptoms in Shift Workers with Shift Work Sleep Disorder(#MP91-06): Men with hypogonadism have low testosterone levels accompanied by physicalsymptoms such as erectile dysfunction, decreased muscle mass, low sex drive and troublesleeping. In an effort to determine whether a relationship exists between non-standard shiftwork and hypogonadal symptoms, researchers examined data from nearly 2,500 men who werepatients at an andrology clinic between July 2014 and September 2016. Seven hundred sixty-sixmen worked non-standard shifts, and 282 were diagnosed with SWSD. The men completedquestionnaires about their shift work schedule, SWSD risk and hypogonadal symptoms(Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (qADAM) questionnaire). The impact of non-standardshift work and SWSD on responses to qADAM was then assessed utilizing ANOVA and linearregression.

Results showed:

Shift workers with SWSD have lower testosterone levels and worse hypogonadal symptoms than daytime workers. Poor sleep habits caused by SWSD may contribute to more severe hypogonadal symptoms in non-standard shift workers. SWSD was independently associated with lower testosterone levels when controlling for age, comorbidities and history of testosterone supplementation.

Study Details

Shift Work is Associated with Altered Semen Parameters in Infertile Men (#: PD13-08):Recognizing shift work negatively impacts circadian rhythms and the hypothalamic-pituitarygonadal(HPG) axis, an integral regulator of spermatogenesis, researchers in Texas set out tostudy the impact of shift work on semen parameters and reproductive hormones in infertilemen. Participants included men who were not able to achieve pregnancy within 12 months, andhad no known genetic or obstructive causes of infertility, as well as, men who had fathered achild within the last five years. Nearly 200 men: 75 infertile shift workers, 98 infertile non-shiftworkers and 27 fertile controls were compared.

Results showed:

Sperm density, total motile count (TMC) and testosterone levels were lower in shiftworkers. No differences in semen volume, sperm motility, leutinizing hormone or follicle stimulating hormone were observed. Infertile shift workers have worse semen parameters than non-shift workers, which is consistent with alterations in the HPG axis observed in shift workers.

Study Details

The Relationship Between Sleep Disorders and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Results fromthe National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (#: MP13-15): By examiningthe NHANES database, researchers sought to investigate the frequency of LUTS in men, with andwithout such sleep disorders as obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia. Researchers examinedthe NHANES database over a two-year period and included men ages 18-70 who completedsleep questionnaires in addition to prostate and kidney forms. Physician-diagnosed sleepdisorders were self-reported by patients and statistical analyses were used to compare groups.

Results showed:

Of the 6,158 men who completed the survey questions, seven percent reported a sleep disorder. Men with sleep disorders, particularly obstructive sleep apnea, have increased nocturia and are more likely to experience daytime LUTS. Older age, Caucasian race, elevated BMI and increased comorbidity score are factors associated with an increased risk of LUTS in men with sleep disorders. Men with obstructive sleep apnea were more likely to experience bothersome daytime LUTS compared to men with other sleep disorders.

These findings demonstrate how sleep disruption and shift work can negatively impact a mansurologic health, said Dr. Adler. The improved understanding about the role sleep plays incontributing to or worsening lower urinary tract symptoms, male infertility and low testosteronecan lead to more effective diagnosis and treatment options.

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AUA 2017: The Effect of Shift Work on a Man’s Sexual and Urologic Health – UroToday

The Effect of Shift Work on a Man’s Sexual and Urologic Health – PR Newswire (press release)

Study DetailsShift Workers with Shift Work Sleep Disorder Have Increased Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (#MP13-12):Previous studies suggest non-standard male shift workers have an increased risk of LUTS, which can include frequency or urgency of urination, reduced urine flow, painful urination or a sensation of incomplete emptying. They also suggest these workers are at an increased risk for developing shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), a primary circadian rhythm disorder that disrupts the body’s internal clock. Utilizing questionnaires from men who presented to a single andrology clinic between July 2014 and September 2016, researchers set out to examine the association between SWSD and LUTS in shift workers. The study population included 2,487 men, of whom 37 percent were diagnosed with SWSD. Each participant’s work schedule, SWSD risk and LUTS (International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) were examined. The impact of non-standard shift work and SWSD on IPSS score was also assessed using ANOVA and linear regression.

Results showed:

Study DetailsIncreased Risk of Hypogonadal Symptoms in Shift Workers with Shift Work Sleep Disorder (#MP91-06): Men with hypogonadism have low testosterone levels accompanied by physical symptoms such as erectile dysfunction, decreased muscle mass, low sex drive and trouble sleeping. In an effort to determine whether a relationship exists between non-standard shift work and hypogonadal symptoms, researchers examined data from nearly 2,500 men who were patients at an andrology clinic between July 2014 and September 2016. Seven hundred sixty-six men worked non-standard shifts, and 282 were diagnosed with SWSD. The men completed questionnaires about their shift work schedule, SWSD risk and hypogonadal symptoms (Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (qADAM) questionnaire). The impact of non-standard shift work and SWSD on responses to qADAM was then assessed utilizing ANOVA and linear regression.

Results showed:

Study DetailsShift Work is Associated with Altered Semen Parameters in Infertile Men (#: PD13-08): Recognizing shift work negatively impacts circadian rhythms and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, an integral regulator of spermatogenesis, researchers in Texas set out to study the impact of shift work on semen parameters and reproductive hormones in infertile men. Participants included men who were not able to achieve pregnancy within 12 months, and had no known genetic or obstructive causes of infertility, as well as, men who had fathered a child within the last five years. Nearly 200 men: 75 infertile shift workers, 98 infertile non-shift workers and 27 fertile controls were compared.

Results showed:

Study DetailsThe Relationship Between Sleep Disorders and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (#: MP13-15): By examining the NHANES database, researchers sought to investigate the frequency of LUTS in men, with and without such sleep disorders as obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia. Researchers examined the NHANES database over a two-year period and included men ages 18-70 who completed sleep questionnaires in addition to prostate and kidney forms. Physician-diagnosed sleep disorders were self-reported by patients and statistical analyses were used to compare groups.

Results showed:

“These findings demonstrate how sleep disruption and shift work can negatively impact a man’s urologic health,” said Dr. Adler. “The improved understanding about the role sleep plays in contributing to or worsening lower urinary tract symptoms, male infertility and low testosterone can lead to more effective diagnosis and treatment options.”

NOTE TO REPORTERS: Experts are available to discuss this study outside normal briefing times. To arrange an interview with an expert, please contact the AUA Communications Office at 410-689-3932 or e-mail cfrey@AUAnet.org.

About the American Urological Association: The 112th Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association takes place May 12 16 at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center in Boston, MA.

Founded in 1902 and headquartered near Baltimore, Maryland, the American Urological Association is a leading advocate for the specialty of urology, and has more than 21,000 members throughout the world. The AUA is a premier urologic association, providing invaluable support to the urologic community as it pursues its mission of fostering the highest standards of urologic care through education, research and the formulation of health policy.

Contact: Christine Frey, AUA 443-909-0839, cfrey@AUAnet.org

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-effect-of-shift-work-on-a-mans-sexual-and-urologic-health-300456690.html

SOURCE American Urological Association

http://www.AUAnet.org

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The Effect of Shift Work on a Man’s Sexual and Urologic Health – PR Newswire (press release)

Adherence to Topical Testosterone Therapy in Primary and Secondary Hypogonadism – Endocrinology Advisor

Adherence to Topical Testosterone Therapy in Primary and Secondary Hypogonadism
Endocrinology Advisor
A retrospective study of males with primary or secondary hypogonadism reports that low adherence to topical testosterone therapy shows an "unmet need and scope for improved health outcomes in this population of men," presented Michael Grabner, PhD, …

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Adherence to Topical Testosterone Therapy in Primary and Secondary Hypogonadism – Endocrinology Advisor

19 foods that lower testosterone levels – Bel Marra Health

Home General Health 19 foods that lower testosterone levels

Testosterone is an important male hormone and one that can be depressed by foods that lower testosterone. It is important to recognize that both males and females have this sex hormone coursing through their bodies and produce them in varying amounts. The difference is that males produce much more of it than females, giving men their defining characteristics.

Testosterone also goes by the name androgen and is produced in the testes. Inadequate amounts may lead to infertility in men as the process of sperm production requires it. Testosterone is also implicated in libido and plays a role in fat distribution, production of bone mass, muscle size and strength, and red blood cell creation.

As men age, testosterone levels lower, which is often referred to as low T syndrome or late-onset hypogonadism. After the age of 40, testosterone levels fall as much as 1.6 percent every year for most men. Low testosterone levels can be further augmented by the foods you eat, with the following being some examples.

Related: 7 Ways to boost testosterone levels naturally

Related Reading:

Is male menopause real? Low testosterone level signs and treatment tips

How low testosterone is affecting more than just intimacy

http://www.shawacademy.com/blog/6-foods-to-avoid-to-optimise-natural-testosterone/ http://build-muscle-101.com/foods-that-lower-testosterone/ https://www.anabolicmen.com/foods-that-decrease-testosterone/ https://www.thedailymeal.com/11-foods-are-killing-your-sex-drive http://vkool.com/foods-that-lower-testosterone/ http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276013.php http://www.artofmanliness.com/2013/01/14/testosterone-benefits/

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19 foods that lower testosterone levels – Bel Marra Health

AYTU BIOSCIENCE, INC. (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Files An 8-K Results of Operations and Financial Condition – Market Exclusive


MoneyMakingArticles
AYTU BIOSCIENCE, INC. (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Files An 8-K Results of Operations and Financial Condition
Market Exclusive
Aytu BioScience, Inc. is a commercial-stage healthcare company focused on acquiring, developing and commercializing products in the field of urology. The Company focuses on hypogonadism, prostate cancer, urinary tract infections and male infertility.
Aytu Bioscience Inc (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Releases Financial Results and Business UpdateStockNewsUnion
EPS for Lands' End, Inc. (LE) Expected At $-0.25; AYTU …MoneyMakingArticles

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AYTU BIOSCIENCE, INC. (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Files An 8-K Results of Operations and Financial Condition – Market Exclusive

AYTU BIOSCIENCE, INC. (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Files An 8-K Entry into a Material Definitive Agreement – Market Exclusive


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AYTU BIOSCIENCE, INC. (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Files An 8-K Entry into a Material Definitive Agreement
Market Exclusive
Aytu BioScience, Inc. is a commercial-stage healthcare company focused on acquiring, developing and commercializing products in the field of urology. The Company focuses on hypogonadism, prostate cancer, urinary tract infections and male infertility.
Aytu BioScience Announces the Acquisition of Nuelle, Inc., Developer and Marketer of Fiera Female Personal Care …PR Newswire (press release)

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AYTU BIOSCIENCE, INC. (OTCMKTS:AYTU) Files An 8-K Entry into a Material Definitive Agreement – Market Exclusive

In Hypogonadism, Stroke May Be Prevented With Testosterone Replacement Therapy – Neurology Advisor


Neurology Advisor
In Hypogonadism, Stroke May Be Prevented With Testosterone Replacement Therapy
Neurology Advisor
Patients with primary hypogonadism, secondary hypogonadism related to overt hypothalamic pituitary pathology, HIV infection, metastatic cancer, a history of prostate cancer, prostate specific antigen >4 ng/mL, elevated hematocrit, or a history of

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In Hypogonadism, Stroke May Be Prevented With Testosterone Replacement Therapy – Neurology Advisor

Testosterone replacement therapy lowers mortality, CV risk in secondary hypogonadism – Healio

AUSTIN, Texas Testosterone replacement therapy may lower the risk for myocardial infarction, stroke and all-cause mortality in men with secondary hypogonadism.

In men with secondary hypogonadism unrelated to overt hypothalamic/pituitary pathology, with a modest prevalence of prior cardiovascular disease, testosterone replacement therapy was associated with a 50% risk reduction of the composite outcome (myocardial infarction, stroke or all-cause mortality), Kevin Pantalone, DO, ECNU, FACE, staff endocrinologist and director of clinical research in the department of endocrinology at Cleveland Clinic, told Endocrine Today.

Kevin Pantalone

Using data from an electronic health record in a large, integrated health care system, Pantalone and colleagues studied outcomes in 418 men with secondary hypogonadism exposed to testosterone replacement therapy (median age, 53.8 years) and 283 matched controls (median age, 54.9 years). The main outcomes of interest were MI, stroke and all-cause mortality after testosterone replacement therapy.

The prevalence of established CVD was 9.8% in the testosterone-replacement group compared with 12.7% in the control group.

Patients were followed for a median duration of 3.8 years in the testosterone-replacement group and 3.4 years in the control group. During that time, the event rate for the composite outcome of MI, stroke or all-cause mortality was 3.3% in the testosterone-replacement group vs. 6.4% in the control group (P = .06). The researchers concluded that testosterone replacement therapy reduced the odds of the combined CV endpoint (HR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24-0.99).

Our study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting [testosterone replacement therapy] may not be harmful in certain populations of hypogonadal men and may even afford a protective effect, Pantalone said. A prospective randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of [testosterone replacement therapy] in men with secondary hypogonadism is needed to establish the safety of [testosterone] replacement therapy, particularly in men with established CVD or those at high CV risk. by Amber Cox

Reference:

George J, et al. Abstract #906. Presented at: AACE Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress; May 3-7, 2017; Austin, Texas.

Disclosure: Pantalone reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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Testosterone replacement therapy lowers mortality, CV risk in secondary hypogonadism – Healio

What’s in the Cards for Repros (RPRX) this Earnings Season? – Zacks.com

Repros Therapeutics Inc. (RPRX – Free Report) is expected to report first-quarter 2017 results this month. Lets see how things are shaping up for this quarter.

Repros Therapeutics share price has decreased 28.8% year to date, while the Zacks classified Medical-Biomed/Genetics industry gained 4.7%.

Repros is a development-stage biotech company focused on the development of treatments for hormonal and reproductive system disorders. With no approved products in its portfolio yet, investors are expected to remain focused on pipeline-related updates by the company. Repros pipeline presently comprises enclomiphene and Proellex.

The most advanced candidate in Repros pipeline is enclomiphene, which is currently under review in the EU. The company intends to get the candidate approved for the treatment of secondary hypogonadism. A decision on the approval status of the candidate should be out in 2017.

Moreover, Repros is evaluating enclomiphene for the treatment of low testosterone level in overweight men. The drug was approved in the EU in 2016 for this indication while the phase II study data is under review in the U.S.

Proellex is being evaluated in phase II orally administered trials for the treatment of endometriosis and uterine fibroids under partial clinical hold with low oral dosage. Repros held a discussion with the FDA in April regarding its progress and the next steps in the development of Proellex for the treatment of uterine fibroids. As per the discussion, the FDA will continue to maintain partial clinical hold as the agency internally reviews data related to the effect of the same on the liver. Repros Therapeutics and its panel of liver experts said that they will submit additional information to the FDA and offer a proposed clinical protocol in a month. We expect update on the data at the first quarter conference call.

The company is also evaluating Proellex in a phase IIb study for uterine fibroids by vaginal delivery. However, this study has no clinical hold issues. The company presented positive topline data from this study in November last year.

Stocks that Warrant a Look

Here are some health care stocks that you may want to consider, as our model shows that they have the right combination of elements a positive Zacks Earnings ESP and a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy), 2 (Buy) or 3 (Hold) to post an earnings beat this quarter.

You can uncover the best stocks to buy or sell before theyre reported with our Earnings ESP Filter.

Aurinia Pharmaceuticals Inc (AUPH – Free Report) has an Earnings ESP of +10% and a Zacks Rank #3. The company is expected to report on May 10. You can see the complete list of todays Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.

FibroGen, Inc (FGEN – Free Report) has an Earnings ESP of +23.81% and a Zacks Rank #3. The company is scheduled to report on May 9.

Immune Design Corp. (IMDZ – Free Report) has an Earnings ESP of +11.29% and a Zacks Rank #3. The company is expected to report on May 9.

More Stock News: 8 Companies Verge on Apple-Like Run

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What’s in the Cards for Repros (RPRX) this Earnings Season? – Zacks.com

Testosterone Replacement Therapy May Protect Against Stroke, Heart Attack in Hypogonadism – Endocrinology Advisor


Endocrinology Advisor
Testosterone Replacement Therapy May Protect Against Stroke, Heart Attack in Hypogonadism
Endocrinology Advisor
Patients with primary hypogonadism, secondary hypogonadism related to overt hypothalamic pituitary pathology, HIV infection, metastatic cancer, a history of prostate cancer, prostate specific antigen >4 ng/mL, elevated hematocrit, or a history of

See the article here:
Testosterone Replacement Therapy May Protect Against Stroke, Heart Attack in Hypogonadism – Endocrinology Advisor

Aytu BioScience to Provide Fiscal Third Quarter 2017 Business Update – PR Newswire (press release)

Interested participants and investors may access the conference call by dialing either:

1 (855) 656-0926 (U.S.)

1 (412) 542-4198 (international)

The webcast will be accessible live and archived on Aytu BioScience’s website, within the Investors section under Corporate Presentations & Media, at aytubio.com, for 90 days.

A replay of the call will be available for seven days. Access the replay by calling 1 (877) 344-7529 (U.S.) or 1 (412) 317-0088 (international) and using the replay access code 10106783.

About Aytu BioScience

Aytu BioScience is a commercial-stage specialty pharmaceutical company focused on global commercialization of novel products in the field of urology. The company currently markets two products in the U.S.: Natesto, the first and only FDA-approved nasal formulation of testosterone for men with hypogonadism (low testosterone, or “Low T”) and ProstaScint (capromab pendetide), the only FDA-approved imaging agent specific to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) for prostate cancer detection and staging. Additionally, Aytu is developing MiOXSYS, a novel, rapid semen analysis system with the potential to become a standard of care for the diagnosis and management of male infertility caused by oxidative stress. MiOXSYS is commercialized outside the U.S. where it is a CE Marked, Health Canada cleared product, and Aytu is conducting U.S.-based clinical trials in pursuit of 510k medical device clearance by the FDA. Aytu’s strategy is to continue building its portfolio of revenue-generating urology products, leveraging its focused commercial team and expertise to build leading brands within well-established markets. For more information visit aytubio.com.

Forward Looking Statement

This press release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this presentation, including statements regarding our anticipated future clinical and regulatory events, future financial position, business strategy and plans and objectives of management for future operations, are forward-looking statements. Forward looking statements are generally written in the future tense and/or are preceded by words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “forecast,” “could,” “expect,” “suggest,” “believe,” “estimate,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” or similar words, or the negatives of such terms or other variations on such terms or comparable terminology. These statements are just predictions and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause the actual events or results to differ materially. These risks and uncertainties include, among others: risks relating to gaining market acceptance of our products, obtaining reimbursement by third-party payors, the potential future commercialization of our product candidates, the anticipated start dates, durations and completion dates, as well as the potential future results, of our ongoing and future clinical trials, the anticipated designs of our future clinical trials, anticipated future regulatory submissions and events, our anticipated future cash position and future events under our current and potential future collaborations. We also refer you to the risks described in “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of Aytu BioScience, Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K and in the other reports and documents we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time.

Contact for Investors:

Amato and Partners, LLC

Investor Relations Counsel

admin@amatoandpartners.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/aytu-bioscience-to-provide-fiscal-third-quarter-2017-business-update-300450288.html

SOURCE Aytu BioScience, Inc.

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Aytu BioScience to Provide Fiscal Third Quarter 2017 Business Update – PR Newswire (press release)

Global Male Hypogonadism Market, 20162024: Type. Size, Share, Trends & Forecast Report – satPRnews (press release)

Sarasota, FL (SBWIRE) 04/25/2017 Zion Market Research, the market research group announced the analysis report titled Male Hypogonadism Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecasts 20162024

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Overview

Male hypogonadism is a medical condition, wherein the testes fail to generate enough testosterone which leads to incomplete development or delayed puberty. The condition is related to the development of breast tissues, impaired development of muscle mass, lack of deepening of the voice, and impaired body hair growth.

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Segmentation

The male hypogonadism market is globally segmented into therapy, drug delivery, and type. On the basis of therapy, the market is segregated into testosterone replacement therapy and gonadotropin-releasing hormones therapy. The gonadotropin-releasing hormones therapy is further sub-divided into luteinizing hormone (LH), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Based on the drug delivery, the market is categorized into injectables, topical gels, transdermal patches, and others. Depending on the type, the market is divided into Kallmann syndrome, Klinefelters syndrome, pituitary disorders, and others.

Request Free Sample Report @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/sample/male-hypogonadism-market

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Growth Factors

The key factor that is driving the male hypogonadism market includes increasing cases of testosterone deficiency among men, increasing awareness among people about hypogonadism treatment owing to awareness drives that are organized by several governments across the world, and increasing infertility rates. The high risk of hypogonadism among the aged population with obesity and diabetes and escalating cases of chronic disorders among the geriatrics are further boosting the markets growth. On the other hand, factors such as high side effects of testosterone products challenge the growth of the market. The market players are focusing on research and development activities to introduce newer products with less or negligible side effects and better results. Technological advancements are anticipated to extend new opportunities to the markets growth.

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Regional Analysis

The male hypogonadism market can be segmented into regions such as North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East and Africa. North America dominates the market owing to the increase in the number of individuals that are suffering from the primary and secondary conditions of hypogonadism, and the rising awareness among the people about treatment. Other factors that contribute to this growth are the presence of unconventional health care infrastructure and growing popularity of the technologically advanced products which will offer new opportunities to the top market players in this market. The region is strongly followed by Europe. Asia-Pacific region is expected to offer productive opportunities to this market owing to the modernization of the healthcare infrastructure in the developing economies of India and China and the growing awareness about the treatment for the condition. In Asia Pacific, there is a rise in the number of people that suffer from hypogonadism and infertility rates coupled with the rise in the geriatric population base having obesity and diabetes are triggering the growth of the market.

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Competitive Players

Some of the key market players that are involved in the male hypogonadism market include Astrazeneca Plc., Merck & Co. Inc., Laboratories Genevrier, Allergan Plc., Endo International Plc., Ferring, AbbVie Inc., Eli Lilly and Company Ltd., Finox Biotech, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Bayer AG, and IBSA Institut Biochimque.

Request Report TOC (Table of Contents) @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/toc/male-hypogonadism-market

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Regional Segment Analysis

North America U.S. Europe UK France Germany Asia Pacific China Japan India Latin America Brazil The Middle East and Africa

What Reports Provides

Full in-depth analysis of the parent market Important changes in market dynamics Segmentation details of the market Former, on-going, and projected market analysis in terms of volume and value Assessment of niche industry developments Market share analysis Key strategies of major players Emerging segments and regional markets Testimonials to companies in order to fortify their foothold in the market.

Browse detail report @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/report/male-hypogonadism-market

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Global Male Hypogonadism Market, 20162024: Type. Size, Share, Trends & Forecast Report – satPRnews (press release)

Global Male Hypogonadism Market, 20162024: Type. Size, Share, Trends & Forecast Report – MilTech

Sarasota, FL (SBWIRE) 04/25/2017 Zion Market Research, the market research group announced the analysis report titled Male Hypogonadism Market: Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecasts 20162024

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Overview

Male hypogonadism is a medical condition, wherein the testes fail to generate enough testosterone which leads to incomplete development or delayed puberty. The condition is related to the development of breast tissues, impaired development of muscle mass, lack of deepening of the voice, and impaired body hair growth.

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Segmentation

The male hypogonadism market is globally segmented into therapy, drug delivery, and type. On the basis of therapy, the market is segregated into testosterone replacement therapy and gonadotropin-releasing hormones therapy. The gonadotropin-releasing hormones therapy is further sub-divided into luteinizing hormone (LH), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Based on the drug delivery, the market is categorized into injectables, topical gels, transdermal patches, and others. Depending on the type, the market is divided into Kallmann syndrome, Klinefelters syndrome, pituitary disorders, and others.

Request Free Sample Report @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/sample/male-hypogonadism-market

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Growth Factors

The key factor that is driving the male hypogonadism market includes increasing cases of testosterone deficiency among men, increasing awareness among people about hypogonadism treatment owing to awareness drives that are organized by several governments across the world, and increasing infertility rates. The high risk of hypogonadism among the aged population with obesity and diabetes and escalating cases of chronic disorders among the geriatrics are further boosting the markets growth. On the other hand, factors such as high side effects of testosterone products challenge the growth of the market. The market players are focusing on research and development activities to introduce newer products with less or negligible side effects and better results. Technological advancements are anticipated to extend new opportunities to the markets growth.

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Regional Analysis

The male hypogonadism market can be segmented into regions such as North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East and Africa. North America dominates the market owing to the increase in the number of individuals that are suffering from the primary and secondary conditions of hypogonadism, and the rising awareness among the people about treatment. Other factors that contribute to this growth are the presence of unconventional health care infrastructure and growing popularity of the technologically advanced products which will offer new opportunities to the top market players in this market. The region is strongly followed by Europe. Asia-Pacific region is expected to offer productive opportunities to this market owing to the modernization of the healthcare infrastructure in the developing economies of India and China and the growing awareness about the treatment for the condition. In Asia Pacific, there is a rise in the number of people that suffer from hypogonadism and infertility rates coupled with the rise in the geriatric population base having obesity and diabetes are triggering the growth of the market.

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Competitive Players

Some of the key market players that are involved in the male hypogonadism market include Astrazeneca Plc., Merck & Co. Inc., Laboratories Genevrier, Allergan Plc., Endo International Plc., Ferring, AbbVie Inc., Eli Lilly and Company Ltd., Finox Biotech, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Bayer AG, and IBSA Institut Biochimque.

Request Report TOC (Table of Contents) @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/toc/male-hypogonadism-market

Global Male Hypogonadism Market: Regional Segment Analysis

North America U.S. Europe UK France Germany Asia Pacific China Japan India Latin America Brazil The Middle East and Africa

What Reports Provides

Full in-depth analysis of the parent market Important changes in market dynamics Segmentation details of the market Former, on-going, and projected market analysis in terms of volume and value Assessment of niche industry developments Market share analysis Key strategies of major players Emerging segments and regional markets Testimonials to companies in order to fortify their foothold in the market.

Browse detail report @ https://www.zionmarketresearch.com/report/male-hypogonadism-market

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Global Male Hypogonadism Market, 20162024: Type. Size, Share, Trends & Forecast Report – MilTech

Impact of metabolic status on the association of serum vitamin D with hypogonadism and lower urinary tract symptoms … – UroToday

The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of metabolic status on associations of serum vitamin D with hypogonadism and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

A total of 612 men underwent physical examination, biochemical/hormonal blood testing, and transrectal prostate ultrasound. Moreover, the subjects filled out standard questionnaires for identification and grading of LUTS and hypogonadism symptoms. Parameters were statistically compared with independent t-tests and correlation analyses.

Vitamin D levels positively correlated with total testosterone (TT) but not with prostate volume or International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly lower vitamin D levels, which were not correlated with TT, prostate volume, or IPSS. However, vitamin D was positively correlated with TT, and negatively correlated with prostate volume and quality-of-life IPSS in subjects without metabolic syndrome.

The clinical usefulness of vitamin D for treatment of hypogonadism or LUTS/BPH varies according to metabolic status.

The aging male : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male. 2017 Apr 17 [Epub ahead of print]

Sun Gu Park, Jeong Kyun Yeo, Dae Yeon Cho, Min Gu Park

a Department of Preventive Medicine , Gachon University College of Medicine , Incheon , Korea., b Department of Urology , Inje University Seoul Paik Hospital , Seoul , Korea., c Department of Urology , Inje University, Sanggye Paik Hospital , Seoul , Korea.

PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28414251

More:
Impact of metabolic status on the association of serum vitamin D with hypogonadism and lower urinary tract symptoms … – UroToday

XOMA Announces Positive Results from its Phase 2 Proof-Of … – Yahoo Finance

BERKELEY, Calif., April 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — XOMA Corporation (XOMA), a pioneer in the discovery and development of therapeutic antibodies, today announced that it has achieved positive Phase 2 proof-of-concept results for X213 in physiological hyperprolactinemia (HPRL). X213 is a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes prolactin action.

This proof-of-concept study was an important milestone in demonstrating the potential efficacy of this novel antibody. We believe that X213 could be a treatment option for a wide range of patients with hyperprolactinemia including prolactinoma and anti-psychotic induced HPRL as the signs and symptoms are similar irrespective of the etiology, said Jim Neal, Chief Executive Officer of XOMA. Consistent with our business strategy, we intend to maximize the value of X213 for shareholders by seeking a license partner for the program.

The Phase 2 study was a multi-center, open-labelled, randomized, single-dose, controlled trial of intravenously administered X213 in women who wished to suppress lactation immediately post-partum. The results of the study indicate that X213, when given as a single 700mg intravenous infusion during the first day post-partum, was effective in suppressing milk secretion, as well as breast engorgement and pain in 100 percent of the treated women. In addition, none of the treated women experienced rebound breast symptomatology during the 21-day study period. While the study was not intended, or powered to show statistical significance, it demonstrated that X213 was: safe and well tolerated; caused no significant adverse events (SAEs); showed favorable pharmacokinetics with a terminal half-life of two weeks and; demonstrated target (prolactin receptor) engagement and mechanism of action confirmation by serum prolactin profiling.

The findings from this proof-of-concept study are encouraging and confirm that X213 inhibits prolactin signaling and thus, may be effective in blocking effects of symptomatic hyperprolactinemia, said Dr. Shlomo Melmed, endocrinologist, Dean of the Medical Faculty and Professor of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. New classes of drugs such as X213 may offer benefit to the up to 20 percent of patients who do not respond to, or are intolerant of, current standard of care involving dopamine agonist medications.

Prolactin is a multifunctional hormone that is primarily secreted by the pituitary and whose best-known functions are related to lactation and reproduction. In pregnant women, excess prolactin secretion (hyperprolactinemia) occurs to enhance breast development and to induce lactation postpartum. Commonly encountered etiologies of hyperprolactinemia include prolactinoma, medication effect, kidney failure, cystic or granulomatous pituitary lesions, and disorders which interfere with hypothalamic inhibition of prolactin release. Prolactinomas, benign tumors of the pituitary gland, hypersecrete prolactin with significant medical consequences, particularly hypogonadism, infertility and osteoporosis.

About X213 X213 (formerly LFA 102) is a first-in-class allosteric inhibitor of prolactin action. It is a humanized IgG1-Kappa monoclonal antibody that binds to the extracellular domain of the human prolactin receptor with high affinity at an allosteric site. The antibody has been shown to inhibit prolactin-mediated signaling, and it is potent and similarly active against animal and human prolactin receptors.

The Phase 2 study evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of X213 in post-partum women. The study was conducted at multiple medical centers in Spain.

About XOMA Corporation XOMA has an extensive portfolio of products, programs, and technologies that are the subject of licenses the Company has in place with other biotech and pharmaceutical companies. Many of these licenses are the result of the Company’s pioneering efforts in the discovery and development of antibody therapeutics. There are more than 20 such programs that are fully funded by partners and could produce milestone payments and royalty payments in the future. In order to maximize its value in a licensing transaction, XOMA continues to invest in X358, an allosteric monoclonal antibody that reduces insulin receptor activity, as the antibody could have a major impact on the treatment of hyperinsulinism. For more information, visit http://www.xoma.com.

Read More

Forward-Looking Statements Certain statements contained in this press release are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including statements regarding: X213 as a potential treatment option for patients with hyperprolactinemia including prolactinoma and anti-psychotic induced HPRL; XOMA’s portfolio of partnered programs and licensed technologies; XOMA’s intent to license X213 and X358; and statements that otherwise relate to future periods. These statements are based on assumptions that may not prove accurate, and actual results could differ materially from those anticipated due to certain risks inherent in the biotechnology industry and for companies engaged in the development of new products in a regulated market. Potential risks to XOMA meeting these expectations are described in more detail in XOMA’s most recent filing on Form 10-K and in other SEC filings. Consider such risks carefully when considering XOMA’s prospects. Any forward-looking statement in this press release represents XOMA’s views only as of the date of this press release and should not be relied upon as representing its views as of any subsequent date. XOMA disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statement, except as required by applicable law.

Continued here:
XOMA Announces Positive Results from its Phase 2 Proof-Of … – Yahoo Finance

Idiopathic hyperprolactinemia increases anterior pituitary hormone deficiency risk – Healio

Idiopathic hyperprolactinemia increases anterior pituitary hormone deficiency risk
Healio
Although hyperprolactinemia causes suppression of gonadotropin secretion, with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hyposecretion of the other anterior pituitary hormones is not considered to occur with sufficient frequency to justify routine testing..

More:
Idiopathic hyperprolactinemia increases anterior pituitary hormone deficiency risk – Healio

Sex steroid concentrations linked with lean mass changes in men – Healio

Sex steroid concentrations linked with lean mass changes in men
Healio
Untreated hypogonadism adversely impacts body composition, bone mass and sexual function in men and has been associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and even early mortality, Arthi Thirumalai, MD, acting assistant …

Read more:
Sex steroid concentrations linked with lean mass changes in men – Healio

Testosterone level and endothelial dysfunction in patients with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. – UroToday

The association between endothelial dysfunction and late onset hypogonadism (LOH) in patients with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) is not yet well settled. Our objective was to assess the association between LOH and endothelial dysfunction in patients with vasculogenic ED. Throughout 2014-2015 a total of 90 men were enrolled in this cross-sectional observational study. Of them 60 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ED were further subdivided into two equal groups: patients with vasculogenic ED and LOH (A); patients with vasculogenic ED and euogonadal (B). Thirty age-matched men with no ED or hypogonadism were enrolled as control group (C). All patients were subjected to detailed medical and sexual history, total testosterone (TT), calculated free (FT) and bioavailable testosterone (BT), flow cytometric evaluation for endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) (CD45negative/CD34positive/CD144positive) and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) (CD45negative/CD144positive/annexin V positive). The mean age SD of the three groups A, B and C were 51.311.1, 53.610.6 and 48.35years, respectively, with insignificant age differences (p=0.089). The diagnostic criteria of LOH were adapted according to European male aging study, 2010. The means of TT(ng/mL) were 2.320.21, 6.430.36 and 5.370.30 in groups A, B and C, respectively. There were highly significant differences between group A and groups B and C (p

Andrology. 2017 May [Epub]

Y A Omar, S E Younis, I Y Ismail, A I El-Sakka

Department of Urology, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt., Department of Clinical Pathology, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28409902

Excerpt from:
Testosterone level and endothelial dysfunction in patients with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. – UroToday

Recent research: Male hypogonadism – strategic assessment and … – WhaTech

This report, Male Hypogonadism – Pipeline Review, H2 2016, provides an overview of the Male Hypogonadism pipeline landscape.

The report also covers the descriptive pharmacological action of the therapeutics, its complete research and development history and latest news and press releases.

Additionally, the report provides an overview of key players involved in therapeutic development for Male Hypogonadism and features dormant and discontinued projects.

This report features investigational drugs from across globe covering over 20 therapy areas and nearly 3,000 indications. The report is built using data and information sourced from This report proprietary databases, company/university websites, clinical trial registries, conferences, SEC filings, investor presentations and featured press releases from company/university sites and industry-specific third party sources.

Drug profiles featured in the report undergoes periodic review following a stringent set of processes to ensure that all the profiles are updated with the latest set of information. Additionally, various dynamic tracking processes ensure that the most recent developments are captured on a real time basis.

The report helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage.

Accessthis report @ http://www.htfmarketreport.com/buy-now?format=1&report=138812

Scope

– The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Male Hypogonadism

– The report reviews pipeline therapeutics for Male Hypogonadism by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources

– The report covers pipeline products based on various stages of development ranging from pre-registration till discovery and undisclosed stages

– The report features descriptive drug profiles for the pipeline products which includes, product description, descriptive MoA, R&D brief, licensing and collaboration details & other developmental activities

– The report reviews key players involved Male Hypogonadism therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects

– The report assesses Male Hypogonadism therapeutics based on drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type

– The report summarizes all the dormant and discontinued pipeline projects

– The report reviews latest news related to pipeline therapeutics for Male Hypogonadism

Reasons to access

– Gain strategically significant competitor information, analysis, and insights to formulate effective R&D strategies

– Identify emerging players with potentially strong product portfolio and create effective counter-strategies to gain competitive advantage

– Identify and understand important and diverse types of therapeutics under development for Male Hypogonadism

– Identify potential new clients or partners in the target demographic

– Develop strategic initiatives by understanding the focus areas of leading companies

– Plan mergers and acquisitions effectively by identifying key players and its most promising pipeline therapeutics

– Devise corrective measures for pipeline projects by understanding Male Hypogonadism pipeline depth and focus of Indication therapeutics

– Develop and design in-licensing and out-licensing strategies by identifying prospective partners with the most attractive projects to enhance and expand business potential and scope

– Modify the therapeutic portfolio by identifying discontinued projects and understanding the factors that drove them from pipeline

Make an enquiry on this Report @ http://www.htfmarketreport.com/enquiry-before-buy/138812-male-hypogonadism-pipeline-review-3

Table of Contents

List of Tables 6

List of Figures 7

Introduction 8

Global Markets Direct Report Coverage 8

Male Hypogonadism Overview 9

Therapeutics Development 10

Pipeline Products for Male Hypogonadism – Overview 10

Pipeline Products for Male Hypogonadism – Comparative Analysis 11

Male Hypogonadism – Therapeutics under Development by Companies 12

Male Hypogonadism – Therapeutics under Investigation by Universities/Institutes 14

Male Hypogonadism – Pipeline Products Glance 15

Late Stage Products 15

Clinical Stage Products 16

Early Stage Products 17

Male Hypogonadism – Products under Development by Companies 18

Male Hypogonadism – Products under Investigation by Universities/Institutes 20

Male Hypogonadism – Companies Involved in Therapeutics Development 21

Antares Pharma, Inc. 21

Clarus Therapeutics, Inc. 22

Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. 23

EndoCeutics, Inc. 24

Ferring International Center S.A. 25

Forendo Pharma Limited 26

Lipocine Inc. 27

M et P Pharma AG 28

Merck & Co., Inc. 29

Mereo Biopharma Group Plc 30

Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc 31

Pantarhei Bioscience BV 32

Repros Therapeutics Inc. 33

Variant Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 34

Male Hypogonadism – Therapeutics Assessment 35

Assessment by Monotherapy Products 35

Assessment by Target 36

Assessment by Mechanism of Action 38

Assessment by Route of Administration 40

Assessment by Molecule Type 42

Drug Profiles 44

BGS-649 – Drug Profile 44

Product Description 44

Mechanism Of Action 44

R&D Progress 44

corifollitropin alfa – Drug Profile 45

Product Description 45

Mechanism Of Action 45

R&D Progress 45

enclomiphene citrate – Drug Profile 47

Product Description 47

Mechanism Of Action 47

R&D Progress 47

fispemifene – Drug Profile 58

.. Continued

Read Detailed Table of Content @ http://www.htfmarketreport.com/reports/138812-male-hypogonadism-pipeline-review-3

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Recent research: Male hypogonadism – strategic assessment and … – WhaTech

Pituitary-testis axis function may improve with GnRH in congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency – Healio

Men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency may see an increase in serum testosterone levels with the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy, according to findings from researchers in China.

Xueyan Wu, MD, of the department of endocrinology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, Ministry of Health in Beijing, and colleagues evaluated 40 men (mean age, 25.5 years) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency assigned to subcutaneous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) therapy for 3 months to determine the pituitary response to the therapy.

Overall, 60% of participants responded to GnRH with a significant increase in testosterone levels compared with baseline levels; the remaining 40% of participants showed poor response to GnRH therapy with no increase in testosterone levels.

In the good response group, serum luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels increased to the normal range, total serum testosterone increased from 0.29 nmol/L to 8.67 nmol/L (P = .00002), and testicular volume increased from 3.3 mL to 6 mL (P = .00005). Eight participants in this group achieved spermatogenesis with mean sperm concentration of 5.51 million/mL at 3 months.

The poor response group showed an increased in luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels, but no change was observed in serum testosterone levels. However, testicular volume increased from 1.9 mL to 2.9 mL.

This study focused on male [congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency] patients and found that 60% of them responded to GnRH therapy, the researchers wrote. This surprising finding suggests the existence of a gonadotropic cell reservoir in the pituitary gland of these patients, despite their hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. To our knowledge, this is the first large study that has revealed the effectiveness of pulsatile GnRH therapy in restoring pituitary-gonadal axis function in [congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency] patients. by Amber Cox

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Read the original:
Pituitary-testis axis function may improve with GnRH in congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency – Healio

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