Study uses Chinese wolfberries to improve vision imperfections caused by type-2 diabetes

Posted: April 4, 2010 at 8:11 am

Story Summary: Dingbo Daniel Lin, K-State research assistant professor of human nutrition, is studying wolfberries and their potential to improve damage to the retina. His findings show that the fruit can lower the oxidative stress that the eye undergoes as a result of type-2 diabetes. In our cultures history, we have traditional medicine literature that describes things like the wolfberry and its functions, Lin said. Oxidative stress is known as cell impairment of the production of reactive oxygen, Lin said. Cellular oxidative stress is involved in many human diseases, such as diabetes, vision impairment and blindness. The researchers also looked at the endoplasmic reticulum, which is where the folding process of proteins occurs in a cell. The in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the wolfberrys phytochemicals protect the retinal pigment epithelial cells from hyperglycemia, or high glucose. Lin said wolfberries could be used as a dietary supplement, though the fruit isnt likely to be found in traditional U. S. food stores. Lin said wolfberries could be used as a dietary supplement, though the fruit isnt likely to be found in traditional U. S. food stores. He said consumers might find them in a Chinese food store or on the Internet. He said consumers might find them in a Chinese food store or on the Internet. The research is part of a fast-moving field called nutrigenomics, which studies the effects of food on gene expression and disease. At K-State, other researchers collaborated on the project: Denis Medeiros, professor and department head of human nutrition; Yu Jiang, research associate in human nutrition; Edlin Ortiz, junior in life sciences, Liberal; and Yunong Zhang, a former research assistant in human nutrition. At K-State, other researchers collaborated on the project: Denis Medeiros, professor and department head of human nutrition; Yu Jiang, research associate in human nutrition; Edlin Ortiz, junior in life sciences, Liberal; and Yunong Zhang, a former research assistant in human nutrition….Read the Full Story

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