Hunt for Missing Genetic Killer Comes Up Empty

Posted: April 4, 2010 at 11:25 pm

Story Summary: Known as copy-number variations, or CNVs, these extra or missing sequences of the genome have been linked to some rare diseases. Researchers thought they might play a role in common diseases, too. To find whether CNVs might play a part, Wellcome Trust researchers compared CNVs in the genomes of 3,000 healthy people with CNVs in the genomes of 16,000 patients. No individual CNVs had a powerful effect on disease, nor did large numbers of them. Though some rare CNVs are linked to disease, and more remain to be found, the bulk appear to do nothing, wrote the researchers. Comments (2)Not a member?If youre not yet registered with Wired. com, join now so you can share your thoughts and opinions. But what studies/experiments that can be done to continue this research? Sounds like the study attempted to examine junk DNA for correlations to specific diseases, without considering genes at all. If genes are active variables in how junk DNA might be expressed to produce disease, the study would not see it. Statistics is funny that way. If you dont look at all the connected variables, you dont get good results. All rights reserved….Read the Full Story

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