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Walking after Spinal Cord injury and Stem Cells – Video


Juan Carlos after having Stem Cell treatment.

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Walking after Spinal Cord injury and Stem Cells – Video

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Regenerative Medicine and Applications of Stem Cell Research – Video


(June 1, 2010) Renee Reijo Pera, Ph.D., and Professor Michael Longaker discuss the future of regenerative medicine and the promise that stem cell research holds for this field. During the final quarter of the Stanford Mini Med School, some of the most timely and important topics in contemporary medicine and the biosciences are addressed. Stanford Mini Med School is a series arranged and directed by Stanford’s School of Medicine and presented by the Stanford Continuing Studies program.

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Regenerative Medicine and Applications of Stem Cell Research – Video

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Regenerative Medicine – Video


This video describes the advancements in use of cord blood stem cells as a possible treatment for over 70 diseases. It provides a review of applications in regenerative medicine (rebuilding damaged organs or creating living tissue) including diabetes and heart disease.

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Regenerative Medicine – Video

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McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine – Video


The McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine was established at University Health Network in 2003 with a generous donation from Rob and Cheryl McEwen, which they matched in 2006 with a second donation.

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McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine – Video

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Dr Farshchian: Regenerative Medicine shows Potentials – Video


Dr Alimorad Farshchian said: Regenerative Medicine shows the Potential of Stem Cell Therapies for ALS and SMA.

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Dr Farshchian: Regenerative Medicine shows Potentials – Video

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Elaine Fuchs Part 1: Introduction to Stem Cells English Subtitle


http://www.ibioseminars.org During embryogenesis, a single fertilized oocyte gives rise to a multicellular organism whose cells and tissues have adopted differentiated characteristics or fates to perform the specified functions of each organ of the body. As embryos develop, cells that have acquired their particular fate proliferate, enabling tissues and organs to grow.

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Elaine Fuchs Part 1: Introduction to Stem Cells English Subtitle

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Harvesting stem cells from horse bone marrow at UT


Staff at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center demonstrate how they harvest allogenic stem cells from horse bone marrow.

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Harvesting stem cells from horse bone marrow at UT

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Trans America Genetics – Genomic Power Sale


Trans America Genetics – Genomic Power Sale

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Trans America Genetics – Genomic Power Sale

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Harvesting stem cells from horse bone marrow at UT


Staff at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Medical Center demonstrate how they harvest allogenic stem cells from horse bone marrow.

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Harvesting stem cells from horse bone marrow at UT

Recommendation and review posted by sam

Biology 1B – Lecture 18: Population Genetics III


General Biology

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Biology 1B – Lecture 18: Population Genetics III

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Glazer’s Edge: Peyton’s Stem Cells


Jay Glazer has the latest on Peyton Manning’s neck injury.

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Glazer’s Edge: Peyton’s Stem Cells

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Mid-Market Innovation: Analytics Tames Genetic Modeling’s Data Explosion


Genetic modeling is changing the face of medicine, and Coriell Institute for Medical Research is helping to lead this transformation. Scott Megill, CIO of the nonprofit research organization, discusses the role of business analytics and business process management in transforming the efficiency of this complex and highly technical field.

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Mid-Market Innovation: Analytics Tames Genetic Modeling’s Data Explosion

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Biology 1B – Lecture 17: Population Genetics II


General Biology

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Biology 1B – Lecture 17: Population Genetics II

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Elaine Fuchs Part 1: Introduction to Stem Cells English Subtitle


http://www.ibioseminars.org During embryogenesis, a single fertilized oocyte gives rise to a multicellular organism whose cells and tissues have adopted differentiated characteristics or fates to perform the specified functions of each organ of the body.

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Elaine Fuchs Part 1: Introduction to Stem Cells English Subtitle

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Breast Cancer and Personalized Medicine


Dr. Carlos Arteaga, director of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center’s breast cancer program, describes how advances in personalized cancer medicine contributes to breast cancer treatment.

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Breast Cancer and Personalized Medicine

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Chocolate compounds fight high cholesterol

Chocolate has received a lot of attention for being a treasure trove of nutritional goodness. Polyphenols in cacao beans are linked to promoting heart, brain, and liver health, which has sparked renewed interest in chocolate as a medicinal food. And a new study adds to the growing list of benefits, showing that chocolate polyphenols also help to lower bad cholesterol.

Published in the journal Diabetic Medicine, the study tested the effects of polyphenol-rich chocolate in a group of 12 volunteers with type-2 diabetes. After 16 weeks, the researchers from Hull University in the U.K. discovered that the polyphenols helped lower participants’ bad cholesterol levels while raising good cholesterol levels.

“Chocolate with a high cocoa content should be included in the diet of individuals with type-2 diabetes as part of a sensible, balanced approach to diet and lifestyle,” said professor Steve Akin, author of the study. Read more…

Immunice for Immune Support

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http://feeds.feedburner.com/integratedmedicine

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Australopithecus sediba – A Close Relative?

Newly discovered skeletons of a 2-million-year old member of the human family called Australopithecus sediba have piqued the interest of paleontologists. Some are suggesting that A. sediba may be a closer relative of modern humans than Australopithecus afarensis – the most famous skeleton of which is “Lucy”, who lived about 3.2 million years ago. Others are not so sure.

In five articles in the September 9 issue of Science, scientists describe some of the primitive and modern features of the brain, pelvis, hands, and feet of this transitional archaic human. The brain shows signs of reorganization, including an enlarged frontal lobe. The hand looks like that of a modern human’s, but it is attached to a long arm typical of species that still swing from trees. The pelvis has some, but not all, of the features of an upright-walker. And the lower leg, ankle, and foot are an odd mixture of primitive and modern features. A. sediba probably could walk upright, though it’s gait would have been significantly different from our own.

Regardless of where paleontologists ultimately choose to place A. sediba in the human ancestral tree, further analysis of the species will almost certainly add significantly to our understanding of the transition to modern humans.

Source:
http://humanbiologyblog.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Motor Fuel From Waste Biomass Material

A long-term goal of policymakers in the U.S. has been to reduce our reliance on imported oil for our gasoline needs. Producing ethanol from corn has been a partial solution, but in the long run it will not provide enough energy meet our needs. Furthermore, using farmland to produce fuel rather than food increases the price of food. But what if we could produce energy efficiently from waste biomass material, such as wood chips, corn stalks, or grass? There’s plenty of energy there; the technical problem has been to find an efficient way to unlock the sugars from cellulose, the main structural component of plant cells.

Researchers at a company called Renmatrix believe they have found the answer; treating waste biomass with supercritical water. Apparently when water is heated to over 374 degrees centigrade and pressurized to 217 atmospheres (about 3,200 pounds per square inch), it enters a “supercritical” state that is neither gas nor liquid, but something in between. Supercritical water has a density of only about 30% of that of liquid water, for example. When treated with supercritical water, the five- and six-carbon sugars in waste biomass material are broken off from cellulose and harvested for further conversion to motor fuels. The energy required to fuel the process comes from burning lignin, a material leftover from the process itself.

So far it’s only been done on a small scale with wood chips. But Renmatrix is opening a new research and development center in Pennsylvania with the goal of developing an industrial-scale process. This is one to watch.

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http://humanbiologyblog.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

An Earth-Abundant Photoelectochemical Cell: One Step Closer to a Hydrogen Economy?

In June I wrote a blog post titled “Artificial Leaf or Solar Powered Electrosynthesis?” about a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The goal of this research was to create a PEC that can use sunlight to split water (H2O) into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2). The stored energy in hydrogen can then be used to generate electricity via a hydrogen fuel cell.

In that post I described the device and how it operates. It essentially has a water oxidation catalyst on top of a p-n junction silicon solar cell. It was a step toward a solar driven device, but unfortunately the solar cell alone did not provide the force (>1.23 V) necessary to drive water oxidation and proton reduction.  The cell had to be supplemented with an external power supply. The device marked a great step forward but not quite a standalone earth-abundant PEC. I concluded the post with the sentence “With further optimization, possibly involving a tandem solar cell architecture, I have no doubt we will see a fully functioning device within the next few years.” While I was technically right in my timeline (< a few years) my estimate was clearly too pessimistic.

A follow up paper to the PNAS publication was published last week in Science. The article “Wireless Solar Water Splitting Using Silicon-based Semiconductors and Earth-Abundant Catalysts”  by Daniel Nocera and the team at Sun Catalytix introduces a fully functional hydrogen and oxygen generating PEC. In fact two different architectures for the PEC were investigated and both can be seen below.

 

The article describes a triple junction amorphous silicon solar cell (3jn a-Si) as the light absorbing and charge separating component which creates the electricity necessary to run the electrolysis of H2O. The 3jn a-Si is composed of alternating layers of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy on a stainless steel back plate. Unlike the devices described in the previous post, the 3jn a-Si can produce > 2 V of driving force and thus it does not require a power supply to run catalysis.

Fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) was deposited on the solar cell to prevent oxidation of the silicon.  The cobalt phosphate oxygen evolving catalyst, discovered by Matthew Kanan and Daniel Nocera, was then electrodeposited on the FTO.  Two different devices, based on the way the cell was completed, were created. In the wired configuration (a) the NiMoZn proton reduction catalyst, electrodeposited on nickel mesh, is connected to the steal back plate via a wire.  In the wireless configuration (2) the NiMoZn catalyst is deposited directly on the steel back plate.

When the devices are submerged in water and hit with light, H2O is photocatalytically split into O2 and H2 without the assistance of an external power supply. The device’s efficiency – the stored energy created during H2 and O2 bond formation per the solar energy that is absorbed – was 2.5% and 4.7% for the wireless and wired cell, respectively. The efficiency of catalysis is primarily limited by the efficiency of the solar cell which were 6.2% and 7.7% in the wireless and wired devices, respectively. This means that even if catalysis is 100% efficient these are the maximum device efficiencies that can be reached. With a more efficient solar cell, the device performance will no doubt improve.

The use of a tandem solar cell to run water oxidation is by no means a new strategy. Almost the exact same wired device architecture shown above was published more than a decade ago by Kaselev and Turner (below).

The key differences are that the previous system 1) used platinum as the catalyst and 2) it was in a strongly basic solution (pH~14) which can lead to corrosion and thus a short device lifetime. The platinum containing device had a significantly higher efficiency (7.8 % from a 9% solar cell). While the efficiency of the recently published system is lower, it is important because it is made with relatively abundant and inexpensive materials (Zn, Ni, Co…) and can operate at a lower base concentration (pH~10). The use of earth-abundant materials hints of a future where such devices are an economically feasible solution to our energy needs.

The pursuit and publication of these wireless and wired devices is less interesting from a chemical perspective, yet quite interesting in an economic and engineering sense. I am not versed in the cost-benefit analysis of these strategies but I know that each has their advantages and disadvantages. For example, the wireless architecture is potentially easier to manufacture and could possibly be adapted as photocatalytic nanoparticles in solution. On the other hand, both H2 and O2 are generated in the same compartment and must be separated for use in a fuel cell. This is not an issue in the wired configuration where each electrode can be operated in its own compartment. The efficiency of the wireless configuration is also lower due to slow transport of protons from one side of the electrode to the other. These are all issues that may be solvable with the right engineering and manufacturing strategies.

What is it going to take for me to have one of these devices at my home? Ignoring the hydrogen storage and fuel cell aspect of the equation, there are a few notable issues about these PECs that need to first be addressed before they can populate our daily lives. First, the efficiency and lifetime of the device needs to be improved. Increases in efficiency and lifetime are likely with better manufacturing techniques. Regardless of how well you put the current components together, manufacturing techniques will only increase the efficiency by a moderate amount because it is limited by the efficiency of the solar cell. Which leads us to the crux of the problem: the price. The complex structure of a multijunction tandem solar cell greatly increases the cost of these solar cells compared to single junction cells. Unless you plan on sending the cells to Mars, it is unlikely that your return on investment will be worth the purchase. The current high cost of this architecture is likely inhibitory for mass production and release to the general public, especially to supply power to the “non-legacy world”. Increases in amorphous silicon tandem solar cells in conjunction with more efficient and inexpensive manufacturing techniques are likely required.

A side note: I really appreciated that this paper explicitly noted that the reported results were for their highest performing cells. It is commonly accepted that many of the devices we make in lab do not perform very well or at all. This makes sense being that every device we make is a prototype often put together by hand. The inconstancies in these manual manipulations often result in a wide range of measured results. In basic research settings were new devices are developed and tested the highest performing cells are known as “Hero devices.” The distinction of “hero devices” from the rest often goes unnoted since most scientists in the field recognize this practice and understand that, with further optimization of manufacturing techniques, we should be able to get at least that much efficiency.



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http://feeds2.feedburner.com/ChemicalForumsBlog

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Product Review: The Reagents App

James Ashenhurst over at Master Organic Chemistry has developed an awesome new app called Reagents.  The app is perfect for students taking undergraduate organic chemistry – but anyone working with organic reagents will benefit from this app.  It’s available from the iTunes App Store.

The Reagents App

via MasterOrganicChemistry.com

The app is a list of all of the most common reagents encountered in undergraduate organic chemistry.  Selecting a link takes you to a page which gives you a short narrative overview of the reagent, an image of the structure of the reagent, and several examples of prototypical reactions using the reagent.  You can ‘save’ a reagent to your favorites list so you don’t have to scroll through the whole list if you don’t want.

This is really a heroic effort.  James and his coauthor Richard Apodaca have given organic students everywhere the handy, mobile reagent guide they all should make for themselves… but never do.  The interface is clean, readily obvious, operationally simple, and does exactly what it needs to do.  It’s a slimmed down version of the full Organic Chemistry Reagent Guide James rolled out a while ago (which is also spectacular, btw). I’ve been playing with it for a little while now, and it’s great.

The Reagents app is currently free, but that is a limited time offer and will expire soon.  Tell all your organic chemistry professor friends so they can tell their students.  It’s currently only available for Apple mobile products, but according to the Reddit conversation, there may be an Android version in the works.

And thanks, James, for giving me one more reason to make sure cell phones are safely stowed during my exams. :)


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Scope of Biochemistry – Will I get a job ?

While talking to many of the students and to some of my counterparts in the city, I noticed that many of them feel that there is no or little scope for biochemistry.   They are actually confusing between the words “Scope” and the “Jobs” after studying biochemistry.
Scope means the areas where one can get into and Job means getting into one.
After studying Biochemistry (BSc or MSc) you can get into the following areas ( with necessary extra skills):
1.   Diagnostic labs in hospitals ( you need to complete Medical Lab Technician course).
2.   Research and Development wings of industries manufacturing all the products that are used in our body, i.e., soaps, shampoos, tooth pastes, perfumes, talcs etc.  because all these products involve the effectiveness in interacting with various biomolecules in our body.  And this can be done effectively by a Biochemist only.
3.   e-Publishing in scientific journals and magazines.
4.  ITeS – IT enabled services  –  this includes Medical Transcription, Medical Coding, Medical Billing.
5.  Off late  Online tutoring is getting more demand, especially from US, UK and other europeran countries.
If you like to set up your career in the area of biochemistry you can get into any of these.
For all of these areas you definitely require good communication, interpersonal skills, and basic computer knowledge.
Well, getting a Job depends on the vacancies and the expectations of those companies.
Cheers 🙂

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http://biochemistryonline.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Ivory Crisis: A simple case of supply and demand

Those of you who regularly read my blog will be aware I have more than a soft spot for Elephants. I’ve never had a favourite animal but I think the […]

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http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/medical-treatment/gene-therapy/feed

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Video Interview: Dr Derek Lim – University of Birmingham, UK

As mentioned in our latest newsletter, several new interviews were filmed at the Third BHD Symposium, and have been posted to BHDSyndrome.org. Dr Derek Lim’s work at the University of […]

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Marijuana use may double the risk of accidents for drivers

Over 10 million people age 12 or older are estimated to have driven under the influence of illicit drugs in the prior year, according to a 2009 National Survey on […]

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Clinical trial uncovers potential ‘functional cure’ for HIV/AIDS

Data from a clinical trial involving UCLA researchers suggest that a new therapy may potentially serve as a “functional cure” for HIV/AIDS. The therapy, called SB-728-T, involves the…

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