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Most Popular Chemistry Papers 2010 (1/3)

There are finally enough people visiting ChemFeeds (~150/day) that metrics like most accessed chemistry paper might actually be statistically significant information. So below I present the top two most clicked on abstracts from ChemFeeds for the first third of 2010.

First Place: Emil Knoevenagel and the Roots of Aminocatalysis
by Benjamin List in Angewandte Chemie International Edition
(DOI: 10.1002anie.200906900)

2nd Place: Total Synthesis of the N,C-Coupled Naphthylisoquinoline Alkaloids Ancistrocladinium A and B and Related Analogues
by Gerhard Bringmann, Tanja Gulder†, Barbara Hertlein, Yasmin Hemberger and Frank Meyer in Journal of American Chemical Society
(DOI: 10.1021/ja9097687)

Some Notes on the metrics. This information probably says more about the people visiting ChemFeeds than the quality of the papers. It would appear ChemFeeds visitors skewer heavily towards the organic synthetics. Perhaps with the recent addition of being able to click on category feeds like all materials and all physical feeds it’ll balance out.

Mitch


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

The International Society for Stem Cell Research Selects Yokohama, Japan for its 10th Annual Meeting; First in Asia

Story Summary: Worlds leading stem cell scientists to gather in Japan in June 2012We have noted the importance of stem cell research since its early phase. The ISSCR annual meeting is the worlds premier stem cell research event, bringing together more than 3,000 stem cell professionals from public and private academic and research institutions and government settings. D. , of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, Calif. , USA, said, It is an honor to have the City of Yokohama as the host city of the first meeting of the ISSCR in Asia. He will preside over the 2012 annual meeting with Dr. Yamanaka as president – elect. org) is an independent, nonprofit membership organization established to promote and foster the exchange and dissemination of information and ideas relating to stem cells, to encourage the general field of research involving stem cells and to promote professional and public education in all areas of stem cell research and application. The Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) is one of the core institutions responsible for the implementation of science and technology policy in Japan, including the governments Science and Technology Basic Plan. JST also works to provide a sound infrastructure of science and technology information and raise awareness and understanding of science and technology-related issues in Japan. The university founded the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) in January 2008 to advance induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research and applications. CiRA is a pioneering organization that specializes in iPS cell research, the worlds first research institute of its kind….Read the Full Story

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  2. 59th Annual Meeting In Honolulu Of The American Society Of Human Genetics
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Lollipops and Ice Fishing: Molecular Rulers Probe Nanopores

Story Summary: Studies at NIST and other research institutions have shown that a single nanometer-scale pore in a thin membrane can be used as a miniature analysis laboratory to detect and characterize individual biological molecules such as DNA or toxins as they pass through or block the passage. The probes consist of DNA strands of known lengths topped on one end by a polymer sphere. If the chain is shorter than the distance to the pinch point, it will be bounced out of the nanopore, telling researchers that a longer-length chain is needed to measure the distance to the gap. The NIST/Maryland researchers also developed a second means of measuring the length of the nanopore to confirm the results of the single lollipop method. In this system, polymer molecules are allowed to circulate freely in the solution found on the inner side of the membrane. Polymer-capped DNA probes of different lengths are forced one at a time into the nanopore from the opposite side. If the end of a probes chain is long enough to completely transverse the channel, it will grab hold of a free polymer molecule in solution. Additionally, this ice fishing method provides insight into the structure of the nanopore. The molecular rulers could serve as a way to calibrate tailor-made nanopores for applications such as rapid DNA analysis. Both images show DNA strands of known lengths topped by a polymer cap (orange sphere) being driven through the nanopore….Read the Full Story

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Pitt researchers discover big role for microRNA in lethal lung fibrosis

Story Summary: Ten percent of the microRNAs were different between IPF and control lungs, said Kusum Pandit, Ph. The researchers particularly noted a diminished amount of a microRNA called let-7d and examined it more closely. They found almost no expression of let-7d in the fibrotic, or scarred, areas of 40 IPF lung samples, whereas it was abundant in 20 healthy samples used for comparison. Further experimentation showed them that let-7d is inhibited by the cytokine TGF-beta, a signalling protein that promotes the development of fibrosis through several biological pathways. These results suggest that by increasing let-7d in the lung, we may be able to slow down or even prevent lung fibrosis, Dr Kaminski said. Our next challenge is to develop methods that will allow us to safely do that so we can test its therapeutic value. — full story– 16 August 2009Scientists at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital have identified inherited variations in two genes that account for 37 percent of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), including….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

MS study suggests key role of environmental factor in the disease

Story Summary: The study was the first to examine all three levels of a human genome at the same time, giving the first full picture of a living genome. The MS genome was explored at a depth of 20-fold coverage. By comparison, the first two single human genomes ever published – those of biologist and entrepreneur Craig Venter, PhD, followed by Nobel laureate James Watson, PhD – were sequenced at a depth of 7 to 8 fold coverage. As far as what environmental factor(s) could be playing a role in multiple sclerosis, the scientists did not speculate in their paper. If this were the case, each persons unique genetic make-up would influence the bodys immune reactions and determine whether they would lead to the disease. Other current hypotheses include vitamin D deficiency brought on by a lack of exposure to sunlight, and smoking. Multiple sclerosis is thought to be an autoimmune disease, a condition in which cells of the immune system turn against a particular tissue of the body. The current study was designed to investigate whether monozygotic twins are truly identical and whether there were genetic or epigenetic differences between identical twins that were discordant for MS. The results, says Baranzini, put us a step closer to teasing out the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors on multiple sclerosis. Interestingly, the researchers noticed a surprising difference between the genomes of twins that was not correlated to MS. They discovered an imbalance in which one copy of a gene is expressed at higher levels than the other copy. We found many instances where an allelic imbalance was larger in one twin than in the other, or where the imbalance was flipped between the two alleles, said Baranzini….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Most states offer HPV vaccinations to girls in juvenile justice system

Story Summary: Most states offer HPV vaccinations to girls in juvenile justice systemNearly all U. S. states offer the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to adolescent girls who have been arrested or detained, according to a new report from The Miriam Hospital and Brown University. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Henderson, along with co-investigators Michelle A. Lally, MD, MSc, and Josiah D. Rich, MD, MPH, both from The Miriam Hospital, surveyed state immunisation program managers or juvenile justice medical personnel from all 50 states. Given that approximately 25,000 adolescent girls pass through detention facilities annually, and their increased risk for HPV, vaccinating these teens should be a priority, says Lally, who along with Rich, are also affiliated with The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and are physicians with University Medicine. The health of this high risk population could be significantly improved with health care programs based in the juvenile justice setting. In most states that offer the HPV vaccine, the state or facility superintendent is authorised to consent for vaccination with the adolescents agreement. Other states initially seek out or require some form of parental consent in order to administer the vaccine. To increase the uptake of the HPV vaccine in the juvenile justice system, the authors recommend all states make the vaccine available to juvenile offenders, offer the vaccine universally to both detained and incarcerated adolescents, and adopt more liberal vaccine consent protocols. Source: Lifespan– 23 August 2009A diagnosis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis is not much better than a death sentence: there is no treatment and the survival rate is less than three years. — full story– 29 July 2009Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have shown that they can engineer mouse and human cells to produce brown fat, a natural energy-burning type of fat that counteracts obesity. — full story– 29 July 2009Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have shown that they can engineer mouse and human cells to produce brown fat, a natural energy-burning type of fat that counteracts obesity….Read the Full Story

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Scientists report several different species of killer whales likely

Story Summary: All for one and one for all– 2 Apr 2010 — There is strength in numbers if you want to get your voice heard. Samples came from killer whales found in the North Pacific, the North Atlantic and oceans surrounding Antarctica. Highly parallel sequencing of DNA is far faster and less costly than historical methods of analysis. For instance, the examination of mitochondrial DNA genome in one sample could have taken as long as several months. But with the use of high throughput sequencing, researchers can complete the same analysis for 50 or more samples in just a few weeks, and technology to sequence larger parts of the genome and more individuals continues to improve rapidly. Determining how many species of killer whales there are is critically important for resource managers to establish conservation priorities and to better understand the ecological role of this large and widespread predator in the worlds oceans. Source: NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service– 17 September 2009Researchers used gene therapy to cure two squirrel monkeys of colour blindness – the most common genetic disorder in people. — full story– 9 September 2009A large international research team has decoded the genome of Phytophthora infestans, the notorious organism that triggered the Irish potato famine in the mid-19th century and also….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

New computational method to uncover gene regulation

Story Summary: The researchers, from The University of Manchester (UK), Aalto University (Finland) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Heidelberg (Germany), say the new method identifies targets of regulator genes. Uncovering these mechanisms holds a key to greatly improving our understanding of biological systems. One important regulatory mechanism is based on genes that actively promote or repress the activity of other genes. It combines a simple biochemical model of the cell with probabilistic modelling to deal with incomplete and uncertain measurements. Dr Magnus Rattray, a senior researcher at Manchesters Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, said: Combining biochemical and probabilistic modelling techniques as done here holds great promise for the future. Dr Antti Honkela, his colleague at Aalto University School of Science and Technology, added: A major contribution of our work is to show how data-driven machine learning techniques can be used to uncover physical models of cell regulation. This demonstrates how data-driven modelling can clearly benefit from the incorporation of physical modelling ideas. Source: University of Manchester– 17 September 2009Researchers used gene therapy to cure two squirrel monkeys of colour blindness – the most common genetic disorder in people….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Einstein researchers find molecular structure of key fluorescent proteins

Story Summary: That finding has allowed them to propose a chemical mechanism by which the red colour in fluorescent proteins is formed from blue. Their study appears in the April 22 online edition of Chemistry and Biology, a Cell Press publication. This advance will expand the imaging revolution that began with a protein found in jellyfish. They were able to use high-resolution light (optical) microscopes to observe the activation of genes of interest and to quantify and track newly expressed proteins as they perform their functions in living cells. Many more fluorescent proteins of various colours were later found in other marine organisms such as corals. Scientists seeking new fluorescent probes first had to fuse the genes for known fluorescent proteins to bacteria; then they exposed millions of these microorganisms to radiation, in hopes of producing random genetic mutations that lead to new and useful fluorescent proteins. The discovery by Einstein researchers will allow fluorescent proteins to be created in a much more systematic and rational way. Since researchers can now follow only two or three proteins at a time, an expanded fluorescent protein palette would be a big help. To understand many cellular functions, you would like to follow dozens of different proteins, so the more colours we can develop, the better, says study co-author Steven C. Almo, Ph. He is an expert in x-ray crystallography, a method that determines the arrangement of atoms within a protein by striking the protein crystal with a beam of x rays. Dr Verkhushas laboratory has also developed new red fluorescent proteins that are photoactivatable, meaning that they can be turned on from the dark to the fluorescent state using a short pulse of light. With these versatile probes, researchers can use real-time super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to capture images as small as 15 to 20 nanometres (the scale of single molecules) in living cells. Before such probes were available, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy could be done only in non-living cells. Mapping the fate of tumour cells in different regions of a tumour was not possible before the development of photoswitching technology, explains John S. Condeelis, Ph….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Gene discovery may lead to new varieties of soybean plants

Story Summary: The find is a significant key to diversifying the types of soybeans growers can produce all over the world. Ma tested the find by using an indeterminate soybean Dt1 gene to change an Arabidopsis thaliana plant from determinate to indeterminate. Ma believes that ancient farmers selected determinate plants that stay relatively short because they are less likely to lodge, or bend at the stem. Their appearance probably resulted in an ancient green revolution in soybean cultivation in the southern parts of ancient China, Ma said. Ma collaborated with Lijuan Oiu at the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Phil McClean at North Dakota State University, Randy Nelson at the University of Illinois and Jim Specht at the University of Nebraska. Ma said he would next try to find a gene that makes soybeans semi-determinate. Source: Purdue University– 17 September 2009Researchers used gene therapy to cure two squirrel monkeys of colour blindness – the most common genetic disorder in people. — full story– 27 July 2009Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to make a movie of bacteria infecting their living host. — full story– 27 July 2009Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to make a movie of bacteria infecting their living host….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Paper wasps and honey bees share a genetic toolkit

Story Summary: A genetic toolkit already has been found for physical traits, such as the development of eyes, said Robinson, who is also a professor in the Institute for Genomic Biology. The purpose of the study was to determine if differences in brain gene activity between the wasps rely on the same networks of genes that in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) drive their division of labour. A previous study of paper wasps by Robinson, Toth and their colleagues obtained a partial sequence of the wasp genome and looked at the expression of 32 genes. That analysis, published in Science in 2007, showed that – as in honey bees – most of the targeted genes are activated differently in different groups of paper wasps. Crop sciences professor Matt Hudson, the teams bioinformatics expert, used a computer algorithm to mine the sequencing data from the previous study to design a microarray. The microarray allowed the researchers to simultaneously measure those genes that were most active in the paper wasp brain. The effort identified more than 4,900 genes that were active in the wasp brain. Source: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign– 17 September 2009Researchers used gene therapy to cure two squirrel monkeys of colour blindness – the most common genetic disorder in people….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Alnylam Biotherapeutics Presents New Results on Use of RNAi Technologies for Biotherapeutics Manufacturing

Story Summary: Alnylam Biotherapeutics Presents New Results on Use of RNAi Technologies for Biotherapeutics ManufacturingCAMBRIDGE, Mass. –(BUSINESS WIRE)–Alnylam Biotherapeutics, a division of Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), a leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today the presentation of new data at the Cell Culture Engineering XII conference held in Alberta, Canada from April 25 – 30, 2010. Alnylam Biotherapeutics was formed by Alnylam to develop RNAi technologies for application in manufacturing processes for biotherapeutic products, including recombinant proteins and monoclonal antibodies. The new research employed siRNAs designed to target key genes involved in the survival and optimal growth of CHO cells: Bax and Bak, which are apoptotic regulators, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a key metabolic enzyme. About RNA Interference (RNAi)RNAi (RNA interference) is a revolution in biology, representing a breakthrough in understanding how genes are turned on and off in cells, and a completely new approach to drug discovery and development. About Alnylam PharmaceuticalsAlnylam is a biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics based on RNA interference, or RNAi. The company is applying its therapeutic expertise in RNAi to address significant medical needs, many of which cannot effectively be addressed with small molecules or antibodies, the current major classes of drugs. In addition, Alnylam formed Alnylam Biotherapeutics, a division of the company focused on the development of RNAi technologies for application in manufacturing processes for biotherapeutic products, including recombinant proteins and monoclonal antibodies. The companys leadership position in fundamental patents, technology, and know-how relating to RNAi has enabled it to form major alliances with leading companies including Medtronic, Novartis, Biogen Idec, Roche, Takeda, Kyowa Hakko Kirin, and Cubist. In addition, any forward-looking statements represent Alnylams views only as of today and should not be relied upon as representing its views as of any subsequent date….Read the Full Story

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Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundationas Genetic Genealogy Database Crosses Historic Milestone with 100,000 DNA Samples, Aided by Multi-Million Dollar Gift from Founder

Story Summary: When Woodward heard Sorenson describe this vision, he suggested the creation of a comprehensive database of genetic and genealogical information from a diverse set of world populations, and the SMGF database came into being. The SMGF database is also the worlds most diverse collection of genetic information, with samples from more than 170 nations. Over the course of the last decade, the Foundation has been engaged in collecting DNA samples from a broad range of cultures from all but a handful of nations throughout the world. The collections include remote villages in South and Central America where the descendants of the Incan, Mayan, Aztec and Toltec empires live; Mennonite populations in the U. S. and Mexico; rich sample sets from China, Singapore, Micronesia, Nepal, Kyrgystan and the Mongolian steppes; and samples from every African and European nation. This database verified family connections no other database has, opened up new avenues for exploration when I had run into a genealogical dead end and provided the closest genetic match Ive experienced in my research. Polley has a family line in Kentucky that reaches back to the 1780s and credits the SMGF database for helping him achieve what he describes as his greatest family history success story–verifying his family line in Virginias Pittsylvania County. Polley is also working to extend his line back to Woburn, Massachusetts in the 17th Century. I am excited to see what it helps us discover in the years ahead. To enable people everywhere to maximize the information and meaning they can derive from their genetic and genealogical data, GeneTree, a wholly owned subsidiary of the non-profit SMGF, was launched in 2007. We invite people everywhere to collaborate with us by bringing us not only their DNA and genealogical data, but also their stories and aspirations. We are committed to extending our unparalleled ability to help people add rich new chapters to their family histories. About the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy FoundationThe Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation (SMGF) is a non-profit research organization that has created the worlds largest repository of correlated genetic and genealogical information. The SMGF database currently contains information about more than 8 million ancestors through linked DNA samples and pedigree charts from more than 170 countries, approximately 90 percent of the nations of the world. For more information about the foundations free, publicly available database, visit www. smgf. org. genetree….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Unigene to Release First Quarter 2010 Results and Host Conference Call

Story Summary: Unigene to Release First Quarter 2010 Results and Host Conference CallBOONTON, N. J. –(BUSINESS WIRE)–UnigeneLaboratories, Inc. Unigene invites all those interested in hearing managements discussion to join the call by dialing 877-407-8035 for participants in the United States and 201-689-8035 for international participants. About Unigene Laboratories, Inc. Unigene Laboratories, Inc. is a biopharmaceutical company focusing on the oral and nasal delivery of large-market peptide drugs. Unigene has licensed the U. S. rights for Fortical to Upsher-Smith Laboratories, worldwide rights for its oral PTH technology to GlaxoSmithKline, worldwide rights for its calcitonin manufacturing technology to Novartis and worldwide rights (except for China) for its oral calcitonin program to Tarsa Therapeutics, Inc. Unigenes patented oral delivery technology has successfully delivered, in preclinical and/or clinical trials, various peptides including calcitonin and PTH analogs. Unigenes patented manufacturing technology is designed to cost-effectively produce peptides in quantities sufficient to support their worldwide commercialization as oral or nasal therapeutics. Such forward-looking statements are based upon Unigene Laboratories, Inc. s managements current expectations, estimates, beliefs, assumptions, and projections about Unigenes business and industry. Such forward-looking statements are based upon Unigene Laboratories, Inc. s managements current expectations, estimates, beliefs, assumptions, and projections about Unigenes business and industry. Words such as anticipates, expects, intends, plans, predicts, believes, seeks, estimates, may, will, should, would, potential, continue, and variations of these words (or negatives of these words) or similar expressions, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Words such as anticipates, expects, intends, plans, predicts, believes, seeks, estimates, may, will, should, would, potential, continue, and variations of these words (or negatives of these words) or similar expressions, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties, and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Therefore, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements as a result of various risk factors….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Preventing HPV might lower risk of HIV infection in men: study

Story Summary: com) — Men infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) are at greater risk of becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than men who are not HPV positive, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Preventing HPV infection could be a way to slow the HIV epidemic, the researchers said in a study published online recently in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. The main trial, conducted by University of Illinois at Chicago researcher Robert Bailey, Ph. The men were tested for HPV infections at the start of the trial and over 24 months; most were followed for 42 months. At the outset, researchers found that half of the men (1,089 out of 2,168) were infected with HPV on the skin of their penis. They speculated that since HPV can cause penile lesions and affect immune responses, it may enhance susceptibility to HIV infection. 8 percent of the men who were HPV positive at the beginning of the trial were HIV positive, compared to 3. Even when we controlled for circumcision status, herpes and other sexual and sociodemographic risk factors, men infected with HPV at the first study visit were at greater risk for HIV infection than men without HPV, Smith said. If our findings are confirmed in other studies, then HPV prevention could become an effective tool for HIV prevention. Carcinogenic types of HPV are the leading cause of cervical cancer, both globally and in the United States. HPV vaccination is routinely recommended for females aged 11 to 12, by agencies including the U. S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the Centers for Disease Control, and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. Cervical cancer screening is still necessary for women following vaccination. More information:The study is titled Increased Risk of HIV Acquisition among Kenyan Men with Human Papillomavirus Infection….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

UMCES fisheries biologist Dr. David Secor receives USM Regents Faculty Award for research

Story Summary: As a fisheries biologist, a large proportion of Dr. Secors research has focused on species that often have management conflicts: striped bass, bluefin tuna, white perch and sturgeon. The Board of Regents Faculty Awards, established in 1995, publicly recognizes distinguished performance by educators and researchers within the University System of Maryland. Dr. Secor is the sixth UMCES faculty member to be honored with the Regents award, joining Drs. Patricia Glibert, Rodger Harvey, Ed Houde, Tom Malone and Diane Stoecker. The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science is the University System of Marylands environmental research institution….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Research pinpoints action of protein linked to key molecular switch

Story Summary: When cells multiply too rapidly, multiply and migrate into inappropriate places in the body, do not die after their natural lifespan or create networks of blood vessels where they should not, cancer results. RhoGDI contains a pocket that can bind this lipid, thus protecting it. The authors show that, when the protein levels of a particular Rho protein are artificially increased, the other Rho proteins are displaced from RhoGDI and degraded. Notably, previous studies have shown that many cancers exhibit altered levels of Rho proteins, raising the possibility that RhoGDI may be playing an important role in the biology of these cancer cells. The authors hope that their work will help scientists better understand the subtle balancing mechanism that keeps cells functioning optimally, eventually leading to therapies that might target the balance of these proteins to prevent the cellular misbehavior that leads to cancers. The research team includes additional investigators from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, UNC McAllister Heart Institute, Nice Sophia Antipolis University in France and Northwestern University in Chicago….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Sensor gives valuable data for neurological diseases and treatments

Story Summary: The nanosensor not only measures glutamate around neural cells, it can tell how those cells are releasing or taking up glutamate, a key to those cells health and activity. Understanding neurotransmitter dynamics has implications for almost all normal and pathological brain function, Rickus said. They also use an enzyme, called glutamate oxidase, on the end of the probe that reacts with glutamate to create hydrogen peroxide. The carbon nanotubes enhance the conductivity of the hydrogen peroxide, and a computer can calculate the movement of glutamate relative to the cell surface. The sensor oscillates and samples the concentration activities of glutamate at various positions relative to the neurons in culture. Those measurements at different distances can tell researchers whether the glutamate is flowing back toward the neurons or dissipating in many directions. Current sensor technology allows for sensing in vitro, but those probes are large and invasive, Porterfield said, and they dont measure the movement of the chemicals. There are many compounds present near the neurons which can potentially create noise, but this sensor should be selective for one compound. The sensor also could be adapted to measure other chemicals by changing the enzyme used on its tip. Porterfield said the next step is to make small improvements to the sensor and adapt it to use other enzymes….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Central Commands Vexira Antivirus positioned among the leading security products in the world

Story Summary: Central Command, Inc . , a leading provider of antivirus, antispyware and Internet threat protection solutions for schools, businesses and enterprises, announced today that Vexira Antivirus was awarded the Virus Bulletins VB100 award in April, 2010. In order to display the VB100 logo, an antivirus product must detect all In-the-Wild viruses during both on-demand and on-access scanning and generate no false positives when scanning a set of known clean files using just its default settings. Additionally, Vexira Antivirus was noted as impressive when describing the results of the reactive and proactive (RAP) test which is an indication of the reactive and proactive detection capability of a protection product. We are honored that Vexira is positioned among the leading security products in the world. Our clients are accustomed to the quality of Vexiras protection and adding the VB100 award is another assurance for them that Vexira continues to meet and exceed industry standards. All Central Commands Vexira products share the same underling technology that protect against viruses, worms, spyware and other malware. The company services customers in over 100 countries and is headquartered in Medina, Ohio. Central Command and Vexira are trademarks of Central Command, Inc. All other trademarks, trade names, and products referenced herein are property of their respective owners. Please make sure to read our disclaimer prior to contacting 7thSpace Interactive….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

New methods identify thousands of new DNA sequences missing from reference map of the human genome

Story Summary: D. at the UW, and is now a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. The human reference genome was first created in 2001 and is updated every couple of years, Kidd explained. Its a mosaic of DNA sequences derived from several individuals. The fact that a person can have one or more copies, or no copy at all, of a particular DNA sequence may account for why these sequences were missing from the reference genome. Each segment of the reference genome is from a single person, and reflects the genome of that individual. That is why some of the positions on the reference genome represent rare structural configurations or entirely omit sequences found in the majority of people. The researchers also developed a method to accurately genotype many of the newly found DNA sequences and created a way to look at variations in the number of copies of these sequences, thereby opening up regions of the human genome previously inaccessible to such studies. Scientists can now begin trying to understand the functional importance of these sequences and their variations,Kidd said. Any study, he continued, that improves the completeness and quality of the reference genome assembly will thereby benefit these projects and lead to a fuller picture of the extent of human genomic variation. Kidds work on this study was supported by a U. S. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship….Read the Full Story

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  1. Company sequences whole human genome for $1,700
  2. Exome-Sequencing Might Help Identify Genetic Cause Of Thousands Of Disorders
  3. Establishing standard definitions for genome sequences


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Obesity gene, carried by more than a third of the U.S. population, leads to brain tissue loss

Story Summary: Further, the brain differences could not be directly attributed to other obesity-related factors such as cholesterol levels, diabetes or high blood pressure. If you dont carry FTO, higher body weight doesnt translate into brain deficits; in fact, it has nothing to do with it. People who carry this specific DNA sequence are heavier on average, and their waist circumference is half an inch bigger. Any loss of brain tissue puts you at greater risk for functional decline, he said. The risk gene divides the world into two camps — those who have the FTO allele and those who dont. But a healthy lifestyle will counteract the risk of brain loss, whether you carry the gene or not. So its vital to boost your brain health by being physically active and eating a balanced diet, he said. And from a scientific standpoint, he said, the gene discovery will help to develop and fine tune the anti-dementia drugs being developed to combat brain aging….Read the Full Story

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  1. Obesity gene, carried by more than a third of the US population, leads to brain tissue loss
  2. Study: Alzheimers Gene Leads to Early Changes in the Brain | Visitbulgaria.info
  3. Study: Type 2 Diabetes May Lower Brain Power, Lead To Memory Loss | AHN | April 12, 2009


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Discovery Of An Influenza Detector Gene That Could Potentially Prevent The Transmission Of The Virus To Humans

Story Summary: The chickens defenses against influenza were augmented and RIG-I reduced viral replication by half. Source: Brian Murphy University of Alberta Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Contact Our News EditorsFor any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. When Your Cycle Becomes a Major HeadacheCathys gets as many as 12 to 15 headaches a month and they are all associated with her menstrual cycle. Figuring out what was triggering her headaches helped Cathy and her doctor come up with a successful treatment plan….Read the Full Story

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  1. Discovery Of An Influenza Detector Gene That Could Potentially Prevent The Transmission Of The Virus To Humans
  2. DNA Testing Of Blood Sample Not Effective For Identifying Newborns With Infection That May Cause Hearing Loss
  3. New Gene For Childhood Deafness Discovered


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Scientists Devise Way To Link Complex Traits With Underlying Genes

Story Summary: There are some cases, he said, where scientists have identified mutations in single genes that produce a specific trait, such as a susceptibility to cystic fibrosisor Huntingtons disease. Scientists want to know all of the genes involved in producing a given complex trait, but they have not been able to find these groupings, leading to the missing problem. Kruglyak was part of an expert panel the National Human Genome Research Institute convened last year on the missing heritability problem. She and Thomas Lehner, chief of the genomic research branch at the institute, said Kruglyaks work is highly valued and described him as a pioneer in the field of statistical genomics. They also study how these changes lead to the observable differences among individuals within a species. For this research project, the team looked to develop a process that would identify genetic associations with observable traits. They crossed two strains of yeast, generating about 10 million offspring. Each of these progeny was genetically distinct as opposed to being a clone. They then sequenced the genomes of the few thousand yeast that survived, looking to see what genes they inherited from each parent. But, at the locations of the genes that protect yeast from the chemical, most of the cells should have genetic material from the parent with the version of the gene that produces greater resistance. The surviving yeast cells genomes were placed on tiny chips and scanned on automated laboratory machines, a process known as genotyping. The machines surveyed each yeast cells genome for strategically selected markers of genetic variation. The scientists repeated this experiment with other chemicals that were toxic to most of the yeast, looking again and again for skewed genetic patterns of inheritance. Detlef Weigel, director of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Germany, already sees additional applications for the technique. While the work was carried out with yeast, I am convinced that it can be easily extended to any other genetically tractable organism, including crop plants. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, a James S. McDonnell Centennial Fellowship and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Do Genes Play A Role In PTSD? Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account….Read the Full Story

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  3. Scientists suggest certain genes boost chances for distributing variety of traits, drive evolution


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Cells Without Mitochondrial Fusion Have Less MtDNA, More Mutations In Their MtDNA, And Less Ability To Tolerate Those Mutations

Story Summary: And indeed, Chan says, that is at least partially the case. Weve showed that in mammalian cells, there are physiological consequences if theres no mitochondrial fusion, says Chan. To show just what happens, the team created mice with defects in two proteins known as mitofusins – mfn1 and mfn2 – which are located on the surface of the mitochondria and are essential to the process of fusion. We were able to specifically delete these mitofusins in skeletal muscle, Chan explains. Their growth is severely stunted and they die by 7-8 weeks of age, just at the onset of adulthood. In other words, without fusion, the mtDNA contains more mistakes, suggesting that fusion is necessary for mtDNA stability. Scientists have noted that most cells have a remarkably high tolerance for the mtDNA mutations that cause these conditions; in fact, somewhere between 60 and 90 percent of mtDNA has to carry the mutation before symptoms will begin to appear in a person with the mtDNA mutation. Cells can tolerate a very high load of mtDNA mutations, Chan notes. Still, it could be much worse – as Chan and colleagues showed when they tweaked the mouse model so that its mitochondria could no longer fuse. When we added the mfn1 mutation into this model, we found that the mice died at birth instead of surviving to one year of age, he says. Now that theyve identified the problems that lack of fusion cause, the team plans to address the mechanisms by which these issues arise. Their work was funded by an RO1 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar Award, and a grant from the NIHs National Center for Research Resources. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Scientific Link To Autism Identified19 Nov 2009During its research into the application of neuroscience in business, a New Jersey based think tank, The Center for Modeling Optimal Outcomes(r), LLC (The Center) made an inadvertent and amazing discovery. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. Figuring out what was triggering her headaches helped Cathy and her doctor come up with a successful treatment plan. Figuring out what was triggering her headaches helped Cathy and her doctor come up with a successful treatment plan. Figuring out what was triggering her headaches helped Cathy and her doctor come up with a successful treatment plan….Read the Full Story

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  1. DNA Nanotechnology Breakthrough Offers Promising Applications In Medicine
  2. Caltech-led team uncovers new functions of mitochondrial fusion
  3. Genome-Driven Diagnoses And Treatments May Be Accelerated By Electronic Medical Records


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

First Mice, Then Fruit Flies, And Now Knockout Nematodes

Story Summary: It was scheduled for online publication Sunday, April 25 in the journal Nature Methods. Weve made it much easier and faster to change the genetic blueprint of a simple worm so we can study and understand how genes are regulated. Jorgensen adds: We want to know what human genes do because they allow us to do all the wonderful things we do – run, speak, live – and understand what goes wrong in genetic diseases and how we can possibly treat them. And we figured out how to delete genes in worms. A Genetic Knife Rather than a Hand GrenadeGenes are on long strands of DNA known as chromosomes. The method cannot specify how much DNA should be deleted or exactly where. Its like throwing a hand grenade at the genome genetic blueprint, Jorgensen says. If we are to understand human genes, its easier to understand their function in a worm. The method developed by Capecchi can hit every gene in mice, crippling them but usually not completely deleting them entirely because mouse genes are large, Jorgensen says. Jumping genes are pieces of DNA that can jump from one chromosome to another, cutting the DNA where they leave one chromosome and cutting DNA to insert themselves in another. The Mos1 gene carries the code to make an enzyme named Mos1 transposase. That enzyme does the actual cutting of DNA, Frokjaer-Jensen says. Frokjaer-Jensen says the Utah researchers crippled the jumping genes put into worms so we can control when and where they hop. Thus, the gene is knocked out in the worms offspring. They found their method could knock out a gene reliably only if that gene was within 25,000 base pairs of the location where the chromosome is broken. Random mutagenesis typically deletes only 300 to 500 base pairs at a time – only part of a gene, Frokjaer-Jensen says. But when the scientists used the DNA repair process to knock out a targeted gene, that process also inserts a working unc-119 gene. So the knockout worms can be identified because they are alive, even if they are ill or abnormal because of whatever targeted gene was knocked out. Knocking out genes in worms is advantageous because it is faster and more efficient than other methods. Adjacent genes can be deleted, making it easier to learn the combined effects of genes with similar functions. Frokjaer-Jensen says it might be possible to use the new method to study genes in other animals that serve as models for humans, including flatworms and zebrafish. But the method probably would not work in mammals because deleting a 25,000-base stretch of mammalian DNA probably would be insufficient for deleting their larger genes. Study Of Rwanda Genocide Survivors Suggests Yes26 Feb 2010A study of Rwandan Genocide survivors, some with and some without post traumatic stress disorder or PTSD, suggests that genetic factors influence the relationship between a persons traumatic load, or the number of. Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Treating First and Second Degree Burns the Right WayBurns are common accidents around the house….Read the Full Story

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