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Biotechnology – Shoreline Community College

Pharmaceutical labs

Dina Kovarik, M.S., Ph.D. (Program Chair)

206-546-4747

dkovarik@shoreline.edu

Joyce Fagel, M.A. (Advisor, Science Division)

206-546-6984

jfagel@shoreline.edu

Biotechnology is an exciting and rapidly expanding field. Biologists and other scientists working in research and development use biotechnology techniques for the production of genetically engineered drugs, gene therapy, microbiology, virology, forensic science, agriculture and environmental science. Shoreline’s Biotechnology Lab Specialist Program opens the door to a field filled with opportunity.

Weprovide practical, “hands-on” learning with cutting edge techniques, technologies, and equipment.You willgain a working knowledge of molecular biology, recombinant DNA, immunology, protein purification and tissue culture. The curriculum also provides a foundation in a variety of math and science disciplines including algebra, statistics, chemistry, biology, microbiology and computer science.

* Both options include an internship in local biotechnology labs.

Both degree and certificate students must submit an application in the Spring prior to beginning thesecond year (core) Biotechcourses. Students accepted into the program will receive notification by the first week of June. Acceptance into the program guarantees you a space in all of the Biotech core courses in the second year of the program.

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Biotechnology – Shoreline Community College

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Biotechnology – University of WisconsinRiver Falls

Mission Statement

The mission of the Biotechnology Program at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls is to provide its students with an education that establishes a strong foundation and appreciation for understanding developments in the rapidly advancing field of biotechnology, to develop the technical and critical thinking skills necessary for success in the field, to foster ethical behavior, and to promote outreach.

The field of modern biotechnology was born of molecular biology and biochemistry. Modern Biotechnology provides a set of tools that allow scientists to modify and harness the genetic capabilities of organisms. This has led to rapid advances in many areas including pharmaceutical development, agriculture, food microbiology, medical devices and environmental sciences.

Some examples of the products of biotechnology include herbicide, drought and insect resistant crops, drugs targeted specifically to disease processes resulting in fewer side effects, and bioremediation capable of removing greater amounts of environmental toxins at reduced cost.

The Biotechnology major at UWRF is an interdepartmental program with an emphasis on the molecular basis of life and the techniques utilized to study and control these processes under in vivo, in vitro, and commercial production conditions. UWRF LogoThe Biotechnology curriculum is an integrated sequence of courses selected from the curricula of the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Animal and Food Science, and Plant and Earth Science. It includes both traditional offerings of the departments involved and courses that reflect advances in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology. The Biotechnology major is designed to provide students interested in pursuing careers in this rapidly expanding field with the academic background required to either secure entry level positions in industry or to continue their education in graduate or professional schools. A student may complete a B.S. degree in Biotechnology in the College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences.

Current curriculum check list (2008-2009)

Planning sheets

A scholarship has been established that is awarded to an outstanding junior or senior biotechnology major that either has worked on a research project, or will be participating in a research project during the year of the scholarship award. Follow the link above for information regarding scholarship criteria, recipients of the scholarship, and contributing to the scholarship fund.

Assessment of student learning is important to the University, the Colleges and the Biotechnology Program. Through appropriate assessment practices, we maintain a strong, current degree program and improve the quality of the education our students receive.

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Biotechnology – University of WisconsinRiver Falls

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Home | Master of Science in Biotechnology | Northwestern’s …

Biotechnology is a young, vibrant and diverse discipline, whose tenet is to use microorganisms for the manufacturing of biological therapeutics, foods, chemicals, and other products benefitting people. It includes agrobiotechnology, biopharmaceuticals, diagnostics, and bioremediation. The future of biotechnology lies in advances in healthcare, industrial biotechnology, biofuels, and cleantech.

Graduates of the Master of Biotechnology program at Northwestern University possess:

Read a message from the director Learn more about the curriculum Meet the faculty

Degree Name

Master of Science in Biotechnology

Duration

15 months, full-time, without internship 21 months, full-time, with internship

Start Date

September 2016

Program Structure

Program Features

Location

Evanston campus

Cost

$14,292 tuition fee per quarter, plus cost of living, textbooks, and other miscellaneous fees

Scholarships of up to $10,000 available to domestic students

Tuition and funding information

Application opens

September 1

Application deadlines

The majority of MBP students are recent graduates seeking careers in biotechnology and associated professions, as well as the competitive advantage a higher degree provides. At least half are typically biology majors; the rest are engineers, biotechnologists, and other science majors. The expected class size is 3540 students per year.

Learn more about our student body

Northwestern’s program is distinguished from other MS in biotechnology programs by the integration of biology and engineering combined with extensive hands-on research in Northwestern University faculty laboratories.

In addition to research experience, students benefit from:

The program also offers multiplecertificate and minor options for students seeking to complement their technical skills.

Our interdisciplinary approach provides students with the flexibility and knowledge to pursue a number of biotechnology professions. In addition to becoming research and process development specialists, MBP graduates have taken up roles as consultants, regulatory affairs associates, and analysts.

Our program can also prepare students to meet the demands of doctoral programs. MBP graduates have pursued PhDs in Chemical Engineering and the Biological Sciences while others have gone on to work towards their MD or JD.

Learn more about career opportunities

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Personalized Medicine: Redefining Cancer and Its Treatment

This story is part of the American Cancer Societys Cutting-Edge Cancer Science series, which is exploring some of the most promising areas of cancer research in depth.

This is part 1 of a 3-part feature exploring what personalized medicine means for cancer patients. Part 2 covers where personalized cancer stands today and part 3 reviews personalized medicine for cancer prevention.

The type of cancer a person has and how it gets treated is no longer just about where in the body the cancer started, such as in the breast or lungs or the colon. More so now than ever, when doctors decide how to attack a cancer, they are arming themselves with a wealth of knowledge about the specific molecular and genetic makeup of their patients tumor.

Many researchers and cancer centers are already embracing this personalized approach to cancer care. Though still in early stages, this field of work is moving and improving at a rapid pace, and just got a boost from President Barack Obama, with his announcement of a $215 million investment to launch the Precision Medicine Initiative. The initiative aims to speed up progress toward personalized medicine for all.

Delivering on the promise of personalized medicine, though, is going to take a massive effort from not just researchers and doctors, but also from health insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and government agencies, among others.

Personalized vs. Precision Medicine

The terms personalized medicine and precision medicine are often used interchangeably. While experts are not in agreement as to whether the two terms mean the same thing, the definitions of personalized medicine and precision medicine seem to be merging. Even President Obama, in his remarks about the Precision Medicine Initiative, commingled the two: Precision medicine in some cases, people call it personalized medicine gives us one of the greatest opportunities for new medical breakthroughs that we have ever seen.

The meaning of the terms and source of the forthcoming breakthroughs is essentially the ability to tailor treatments, as well as prevention strategies, to the unique characteristics of each person.

The presidents initiative, and the terms themselves, extend beyond cancer, and are meant to encompass all health issues. Cancer, though, is a major focus of the Precision Medicine Initiative, especially its nearer-term goals.

Taking Steps Toward Personalized Medicine

A lot of work has already been done to make cancer care more personalized, partly because cancer is so complex that it has forced scientists to dig deep into the inner workings of human cells to figure out cancers causes.

Decades of advances in basic science, technology, therapeutics, and the understanding of the genetic causes of cancer have coalesced in recent years to make personalized cancer care possible.

What researchers have learned over time is that cancer can arise from any number of genetic malfunctions, and often is due to a combination of errors, that ultimately lead to the out-of-control cell growth that causes tumors to grow and spread.

This knowledge has allowed doctors to sometimes move cancer treatment from a broad-brush approach using radiation, surgery, and chemotherapy to wipe out cancer and taking out normal healthy cells in the process to a more targeted technique.

Targeted therapy took off in the late 1990s and early 2000s, with the advent of drugs that interfere with the essential functions of cancer cells in order to get them to die off such as by stopping cancer cells from dividing or keeping tumors from making the new blood vessels they need to grow.

Targeted drugs gave doctors the ability to start customizing treatments, to a certain degree, to the patient. But researchers discovered that like radiation and chemo targeted therapies arent one size fits all. Every patient has a unique set of factors driving their cancer. In other words, there are multiple targets in each patient that may need to be hit. This is where tumor profiling comes in.

Better Treatments, Fewer Side Effects

The idea of analyzing an individual patients tumor to determine what combination of drugs will work best is what personalized cancer care is all about. With this level of specificity also comes greater potential to decrease toxic side effects. The overall toxicity to patients should be reduced because you are more likely to use the best collection of drugs the first time around, says William Phelps, Ph.D., the director of preclinical and translational cancer research at the American Cancer Society.

When it comes to cancer, personalization can take several different forms currently. It might mean:

The ability to look at the genetic makeup of a persons tumor in a relatively quick and low-cost manner has been one of the most important contributors to progress in personalized cancer care. A major technological advance that has made my work possible was the tumbling down in cost and time of sequencing patients tumors, says Ross Cagan, Ph.D., director of the Mount Sinai Center for Personalized Cancer Therapeutics.

Lower cost, though, does not yet mean affordable for everyone.

Bottom Line

A 2011 National Research Council report on precision medicine explains why these advances matter, by contrasting breast cancer treatment today and 25 years ago. Twenty-five years ago, women had few treatment options basically hormone therapy or chemo, both of which could have significant side effects.

Today, many patients have treatment options based on the particular markers in their tumors. These patients can get better, more specific treatments, which might also have fewer side effects.

This is one of the major goals of personalized medicine give cancer patients the treatments that are most likely to work on their particular cancer with fewer harmful side effects.

READ PART 2: Personalized Cancer Care: Where it Stands Today

Excerpt from:
Personalized Medicine: Redefining Cancer and Its Treatment

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Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

Quadriplegia, incomplete 31.2% – Paraplegia, complete 28.2% – Paraplegia, incomplete 23.1% – Quadriplegia, complete 17.5%

The figures above represent the resultant permanent disability suffered by a survey of people breaking their backs and necks. These statistics show that an incomplete spinal cord injury is more prevalent than complete ones. The figures for incomplete spinal cord injury may indeed be much higher because they don’t take account of those people who have been treated by general hospitals instead of a specialist spinal injuries unit. Today advances in medical knowledge and patient management at the scene of an injury mean a lot more people will survive what used to be a fatal injury. These advances, critically in patient management are leading to a greater prevalence of incomplete injuries too.

An incomplete spinal cord injury is the term used to describe damage to the spinal cord that is not absolute. The incomplete injury will vary enormously from person to person and will be entirely dependant on the way the spinal cord has been compromised.

The true extent of many incomplete injuries isn’t fully known until 6-8 weeks post injury. The spinal cord normally goes into what is called spinal shock after it has been damaged. The swelling and fluid masses showing on any resultant X-ray, MRI or CT scans, may well mask the true nature of the underlying injury. It is not uncommon for someone who is completely paralysed at the time of injury to get a partial or very near full recovery from their injuries after spinal shock has subsided.

Incomplete Paraplegia – Incomplete Tetraplegia

Types of Incomplete Spinal Injury An incomplete lesion is the term used to describe partial damage to the spinal cord. With an incomplete lesion, some motor and sensory function remains. People with an incomplete injury may have feeling, but little or no movement. Others may have movement and little or no feeling. Incomplete spinal injuries differ from one person to another because the amount of damage to each persons nerve fibres is different.

The effects of incomplete lesions depend upon the area of the cord (front, back, side, etc) affected. The part of the cord damaged depends on the forces involved in the injury.

Anterior Cord Syndrome: is when the damage is towards the front of the spinal cord, this can leave a person with the loss or impaired ability to sense pain, temperature and touch sensations below their level of injury. Pressure and joint sensation may be preserved. It is possible for some people with this injury to later recover some movement. This is a type of incomplete spinal cord injury

Central Cord Syndrome: is when the damage is in the centre of the spinal cord. This typically results in the loss of function in the arms, but some leg movement may be preserved. There may also be some control over the bowel and bladder preserved. It is possible for some recovery from this type of injury, usually starting in the legs, gradually progressing upwards. This is a type of incomplete spinal cord injury

Posterior Cord Syndrome: is when the damage is towards the back of the spinal cord. This type of injury may leave the person with good muscle power, pain and temperature sensation, however they may experience difficulty in coordinating movement of their limbs. This is a type of incomplete spinal cord injury

Brown-Squard syndrome: is when damage is towards one side of the spinal cord. This results in impaired or loss of movement to the injured side, but pain and temperature sensation may be preserved. The opposite side of injury will have normal movement, but pain and temperature sensation will be impaired or lost. This is a type of incomplete spinal cord injury

Cauda equina lesion: The Cauda Equina is the mass of nerves which fan out of the spinal cord at between the first and second Lumbar region of the spine. The spinal cord ends at L1 and L2 at which point a bundle of nerves travel downwards through the Lumbar and Sacral vertebrae. Injury to these nerves will cause partial or complete loss of movement and sensation. It is possible, if the nerves are not too badly damaged, for them to grow again and for the recovery of function. This is a type of incomplete spinal cord injury

Incomplete Paraplegia – Incomplete Tetraplegia – Treatment – Complications – Causes of SCI – My Injury

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Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS) | UCLA Broad Stem …

iPSC are derived from skin or blood cells that have been reprogrammed back into an embryonic-like pluripotent state that enables the development of an unlimited source of any type of human cell needed for therapeutic purposes. For example, iPSC can be prodded into becoming beta islet cells to treat diabetes, blood cells to create new blood free of cancer cells for a leukemia patient, or neurons to treat neurological disorders.

In late 2007, a BSCRC team of faculty, Drs. Kathrin Plath, William Lowry, Amander Clark, and April Pyle were among the first in the world to create human iPSC. At that time, science had long understood that tissue specific cells, such as skin cells or blood cells, could only create other like cells. With this groundbreaking discovery, iPSC research has quickly become the foundation for a new regenerative medicine.

Using iPSC technology our faculty have reprogrammed skin cells into active motor neurons, egg and sperm precursors, liver cells, bone precursors, and blood cells. In addition, patients with untreatable diseases such as, ALS, Rett Syndrome, Lesch-Nyhan Disease, and Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy donate skin cells to BSCRC scientists for iPSC reprogramming research. The generous participation of patients and their families in this research enables BSCRC scientists to study these diseases in the laboratory in the hope of developing new treatment technologies.

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS) | UCLA Broad Stem …

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Spinal cord injury | girlshealth.gov

http://www.girlshealth.gov/

Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin, a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Childrens National Medical Center. Check out an article on wheelchairs just for teens.

Your spinal cord is a big bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals from your brain to the rest of your body and from your body to your brain.

A spinal cord can be injured in several different ways, including from a fall or while playing sports. The most common causes are car accidents. And alcohol often plays a part in spinal cord injuries.

A person who has a spinal cord injury loses all or some feeling and movement below the site of the injury. For example, if your spinal cord is injured just above your hips, you might lose feeling and movement in your hips, legs, and feet.

If you have a spinal injury you may need surgery, physical therapy, and other forms of treatment. You likely will work with a treatment team that includes rehabilitation specialists (see the box below for more information) who will help you build your strength and learn some new ways to do things. They also can help you learn how to take good care of your body. If youll be using a wheelchair, for example, you may learn how to avoid skin sores that can come from sitting for a long time.

Of course, if you have a spinal cord injury, its not just your body thats affected. Your emotions have taken a big hit too. Peoples reactions range from relief that their accident wasnt worse to fear about how their lives may change. Whatever your reactions, your treatment team can help you deal with all that too. Tell them, your parents, or other people you trust how you feel and what they can do to help.

Adjustment is a big part of dealing with a spinal cord injury. Adjustment means getting used to something new and also making changes to better handle something new. Each person who is injured adjusts in his or her own way. For example, some people may not realize how serious their injury is right away. For teens, coping with changes after an injury can be even harder. This is because, as a teen, you also are coping with the change from childhood to adulthood.

Keep in mind that anger and grief are normal. But do not let your feelings keep you from taking care of yourself. Make sure to do what the doctor tells you to do and try to focus on your therapy.

Adjusting to your injury likely will be easier if you:

You will have to adjust to new experiences throughout your life with this injury. As tough as it can be, dealing with the different challenges that come your way will make you strong and will really make you shine! Had you hoped to be a doctor someday before your injury? Or hoped to have a family? Well, your long-term goals may not have to change! Talk to your parents or guardians, health care team, and teachers about what you need to feel more comfortable at school so that you can do well. And, most importantly, follow the advice of your health care team about taking care of your health on a daily basis.

What are pediatric rehabilitation specialists?

They are professionals who help young people get better after a serious illness or injury. They include physical therapists and others who can help you build your skills and strength.

Dr. Jeffrey Rabin, a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Childrens National Medical Center, offers this advice on living with spinal cord injury:

Q. What can teens do to feel more comfortable in a hospital or rehabilitation center? A. Teens should know that a hospital is not a pleasant place, and that recovery is going to be hard work. It can help to trust your health care team members they always have your best interests in mind. And, they will do what they can to make your stay as nice as possible.

Q. How can teens make the recovery process smoother? A. Healing after a spinal cord injury is hard on your body and mind. There is also a lot to learn about the other health issues that can go along with spinal cord injuries, but it will get easier to manage these in time. Listen to your doctor and other health care team members when they teach you how to care for yourself.

Q. What should patients ask their doctors? A. Ask your doctor about doing the things you enjoy. He or she wants to hear you ask if you can still go camping and play sports!

Q. What can make it easier for teens with spinal cord injuries to deal with friends and family? A. Let people know that you are still the same person, only now you are dealing with a medical problem. You can tell them that everyone has a medical problem at some point in their lives and that you are dealing with yours early in life.

Q. What should teens know about spinal cord injury research that is going on? A. It is important to be aware of how serious your injury is. At the same time, there is a lot of spinal cord injury research taking place and it is okay to hope for a cure for paralysis someday. The best thing you can do is focus on moving ahead and living life with the injury you have, in the healthiest way possible.

Q. Can teen girls with spinal cord injuries have babies? A. Girls can absolutely become mothers someday! The doors are still wide open for your future goals whether those goals are to have a family or do anything else that you put your mind to.

Content last reviewed February 16,2011 Page last updated October 31,2013

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Home – Spinal Cord Injury BC

Aberdeen Helicopters Ltd.

Back Eddy Pub

Best Western Cowichan Valley Inn

Blenz at Richmond Centre

Blenz Coffee Vernon

Blusson Spinal Cord Centre

Campbell River Online Gourmet Cafe

Cascades Casino (Langley)

Cates Park

Centennial Park

College of New Caledonia

Cool Beans Cafe

Creekside Community Centre

Diver Lake Park (Nanaimo)

Duchess Park Secondary School

Elk Lake

Fintry Provincial Campground

Fore Bistro & Patio

Fort Bowling Lanes

GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre

Granville Island – a rented community hall

Granville Island Picnic Pavilion

Home of Charlie & Barb Jaggernath

Hummus Brothers Tapas Bar

IHOP – Chilliwack

Jericho Sailing Centre (Vancouver)

Kinsmen Hall

Kitsilano Beach Park Tennis Courts (Vancouver)

Likely

Locarno Beach Park (Vancouver)

Lost Lake Park (Whistler)

Maffeo Sutton Park (Nanaimo)

Metchosin Community House

Milano Coffee Lounge and Tasting Bar (Vancouver)

MS Society Prince George

MS Society Victoria

Murphy Battista Personal Injury Resource Centre (Vancouver)

Nanaimo Aquatic Centre

Nanaimo Curling Club

North Peace Arena

Northern Grand Hotel

Northern Lights Estate Winery

Northern Sports Centre

Orpheum Theatre

Owl’s Roost

Penticton Lake City Resort and Casino

Petra’s Arts Kafe (Tsawwassen Shopping Centre)

Point Grey Golf & Country Club (Vancouver)

Pomeroy Sport Centre (Fort St. John)

Prince George Aquatic Centre

Prince George Fort George Park Bandshell

Quality Foods (Courtenay)

Richmond Curling Club

Richmond Olympic Oval

River Rock Pub & Steakhouse

Roundhouse Community Centre (Vancouver)

Savalas Steak House (Quesnel)

Spinal Cord Injury BC (Prince George)

Spinal Cord Injury BC (Vancouver)

Stanley Park Fish House (Vancouver)

Steel Toad

Surrey City Centre Library

Surrey Sport & Leisure Centre

Temptasian Restaurant & Lounge

Terra Breads (Kitsilano)

Trinity Baptist Church

Twisted Cork

University of Northern BC – Administration Atrium

University of the Fraser Valley Canada Education Park

Vancouver – The Backstage Lounge

Vancouver Heritage Hall

Vancouver Olympic Village Square (The Birds sculpture)

VanDusen Botanical Gardens (Vancouver)

Victoria Disability Resource Centre

Victoria Save-On-Foods Memorial Arena

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BioOne Online Journals – BioScience

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American Osteopathic Association of Prolotherapy …

Prolotherapy has as its current primary applications in the treatment of:

With a precise injection of a mild irritant solution directly on the site of the torn or stretched ligament or tendon, Prolotherapy creates a mild, controlled injury that stimulates the bodys natural healing mechanisms to lay down new tissue on the weakened area. The mild inflammatory response that is created by the injection encourages growth of new ligament or tendon fibers, resulting in a tightening of the weakened structure. Additional treatments repeat this process, allowing a gradual buildup of tissue to restore the original strength to the area. Injection of varicose veins and other similar abnormalities creates a mild inflammatory response causing them to contract so that they become smaller or even vanish.

Each patient must be evaluated thoroughly with patient history, physical exam, X-ray exam, and full laboratory work up before treatment will be administered. With this information, your physician can evaluate your potential success with this therapy. Success depends on factors which include the history of damage to the patient, the patients overall health and ability to heal, and any underlying nutritional deficiencies that would impede the healing process.

This form of therapy can be used to treat dislocation of the joints, knee pain, shoulder pain, Temporal Mandibular Joint dysfunction, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and disc problems at any level of the spine. The therapy affects only the area treated and does not cause any problem in any other area. Spider veins, abnormal or bulging veins and other similar conditions can be treated on the legs, feet, hands, arms, breast, face, and most other areas.

The treatments should be administered every one, two, or three weeks, as determined by your treating physician. Vein treatments are usually scheduled four or more weeks apart. The American Osteopathic Association of Prolotherapy Regenerative Medicine, Inc. is dedicated toward improving the practice of, and disseminating knowledge about Prolotherapy. (Previously known as Sclerotherapy)

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American Osteopathic Association of Prolotherapy …

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Gene Therapy IPS Cell Therapy IPS Cell Therapy

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Center for Personalized Medicine | Roswell Park Cancer …

TheCenter for Personalized Medicine (CPM)is helping doctorsdeliver the best possible patient care by developing laboratory testing solutions that accurately, quickly and deeply inform cliniciansof the latest treatment and careoptions based on their patients’unique tumor profiles.

The CPM brings together a multidisciplinary expert teamin the areas of oncology, pathology, laboratory and information technology, bioinformatics, medical informaticsand health care delivery to perform cutting edge research and createthe highest quality, evidence-based genomic tests available using advanced molecular diagnostic technologies. The team is developing a comprehensive OmniSeq Programto implement personalized genomic medicine in routine cancer care.

This is the future of medicine, not just in oncology but across all diseases. Candace Johnson, PhD, President & CEO of RPCI

In cancer, personalized medicine uses advanced laboratory technologies to detect alterations in tumor DNA to match a patient to the treatments that will work best for their specific tumor, help avoid unnecessary treatment, find out how well treatment is working over time or make a prognosis.

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Center for Personalized Medicine | Roswell Park Cancer …

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Health Science Major | Bachelor of Science Degree | Nova …

BHS 3100 Current Issues in Health Care This course discusses current issues and concepts regarding health care to prepare the student with the essential vocabulary and thought processes to understand and evaluate the legal, political and ethical challenges facing health care in the US. 3 BHS 3101 History of the US Health System This course will examine the origins and ongoing development of the US health system. Students will gain historical understanding of the origins and forces that have influenced change within the US health care system. 3 BHS 3110 Health Care Ethics (required) This course is designed to introduce ethical thinking and concepts regarding health care to prepare the student with the essential vocabulary and thought processes to understand, evaluate and participate in ethical decision making. 3 BHS 3120 Introduction to Epidemiology (required) The purpose of this course is to introduce the history and development of epidemiology in relation to public health and disease. Communicable, epidemic and endemic as well as social disease will be discussed. 3 BHS 3130 Research Design in Health Care This course is designed as an introduction to critical analysis of research and medical literature as well as basic research methods. The course includes an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics and research design. Statistical and research concepts and procedures are combined with an emphasis on practical health care applications. 3 BHS 3140 Health Care Practice The purpose of this course is to study the legal implications of licensing, practice, and contractual employment. The importance of understanding rules of practice and standards of care are discussed 3 BHS 3150 Principles of Leadership (required) This course will provide an overview of numerous leadership theories to prepare the student for a leadership role in Health Care. The course will critically analyze the differences between leadership and management 3 BHS 3151 Health Services Management This course will provide an overview of health care and general management to prepare the student for a managerial role in Health Care administration. Course topics include human resource issues and policy, personnel planning, staffing, development, coaching and training of employees. 3 BHS 3155 Conflict Resolution in Health Care (required) The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the conflict and effective methods and strategies for reducing the incidence of workplace conflict including employee-employee conflict, supervisor subordinate conflict, patient-patient conflict and patient/client provider conflict. 3 BHS 3160 Health Policy (required) This course provides the student with a broad understanding of policy, how health care is organized, dispensed and how the practitioner can better work in the system. Topics of discussion include cost control, long term care, quality control, ethical issues and insurance. 3 BHS 3161 Concepts of Health Care Finance The course introduces the fundamental tools, concepts, and applications aimed at providing students an understanding of numerous financial theories and techniques utilized in health care financial management. The course materials are structured around emerging health care policies and the role finance and economics play in establishing policy. Cases studies are drawn from a variety of sources such as health maintenance organizations, home health agencies, nursing units, hospitals, and integrated health care systems. Some topics of discussion also include: concepts of capital financing for providers, budgeting, financial ethics, payment systems, provider costs, high cost of health care, and measuring costs. 3 BHS 3162 Economics of Health Care Services This course will teach the student to use economic analysis to understand critical issues in health care and health policy. Issues to be studied include the demand for health care, health insurance markets, managed care, medical technology, government health care programs, national health reform, and the pharmaceutical industry. The course will focus on the US health care sector, but will also examine the health care systems of other countries. 3 BHS 3170 Health Care Delivery Systems This course is designed as an introduction to health care plans that are underwritten by the federal government as well as selected private HMO’s. Topics will include Medicare, Medicaid, Public Health, Indian Health Service, Veteran’s Administration, Military Health Systems and Managed Care. An understanding of the social, political and professional forces that shape the health care delivery system will be discussed 3 BHS 3190 Patient Education in Health Care Patient education is an integral part of health care in every setting, from patient treatment, to health and wellness promotion, to injury and illness prevention. The focus of this course is to explore the many issues that impact patient education, from both a health care professional and management perspective. Adult education theory, patient/practitioner interaction, communication barriers, strategies for success, web-based patient education, documentation, federal laws and initiatives and standards for patient education are some of the topics that will be examined. 3 BHS 3195 Therapeutic Communications for Health Care Professionals This course covers a variety of general concepts and contemporary discussions in the area of therapeutic communications. Attention is paid to self-awareness, basic communication skills, and therapeutic responses from all health care professionals. 3 BHS 4000 Cultural Competency in Health Care (required) The purpose of this course is to develop competency and better understanding when confronted with issues related to culture, diversity and ethnically based customs, rituals, alternative health care choices, folk medicine, cultural structure and viewpoints and the practitioner’s delivery of health care. 3 BHS 4001 Individuals with Disabilities and Special Needs With the continued graying of the American population and the extending life expectancy of individuals with disabilities there are a growing number of individuals facing chronic life challenges. These individuals are consumers of health care. It is incumbent on health care providers to understand how different challenges affect a person’s abilities. Topics of discussion include: laws that impact services, the history of disability care, and specific disabilities and their impact on functioning. 3 BHS 4005 Alternative and Integrative Medicines in Health Care This course examines and analyzes alternative and integrative medicines and their impact on the healthcare industry. The approach to the subject is to present selected alternative and integrative medicine fields in an informative, non-judgmental format. Example topics include acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, homeopathy, massage and naturopathic medicine 3 BHS 4006 Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine This course will discuss and analyze the impact, origins and background of Chinese medicine. It is important to enter this class with an open mind, and understand that there are other forms of treatment for disease, different than those taught in westernized medicine programs. Critical analysis of the meridians and pathways and various signs and symptoms associated with disease will be covered. 3 BHS 4009 Sports Medicine Principles and Practice This course will present a study of athletic injuries and the principle concepts and practices of Sports Medicine including discussion of; prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery. The major musculoskeletal portions of the body will be covered, major preventive measures will be studied, and the major sports injuries will be addressed. The course will identify the medical treatments associated with the major sports injuries. 3 BHS 4010 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to work with communities to improve health status of the community. Major topics will include health promotion and disease prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the “Healthy People 2010” initiatives. 3 BHS 4011 Bioterrorism: Health Care Readiness and Response This course uses a systems perspective to provide health professionals with an understanding of the prevention and response to the intentional release of harmful biologic agents. Category A diseases will be reviewed including anthrax and smallpox. Risk assessment and reduction for health care facilities will be discussed. The structure of public disaster response agencies and the potential difficulties integrating with privately-held critical infrastructure will be evaluated. Tactics and structural components from the class can also be used in unintentional outbreaks to reduce their impact. 3 BHS 4012 Torture, Violence and Trauma – Health Care’s Healing Role This course provides an overview of the physical and psychological effects of torture, violence, and trauma. It focuses on the relationship between health care professionals and victims of human rights violations. Discussion topics include the detection, treatment and documentation of victims of these events. The course examines the role health care as it relates to incidents of torture, violence and trauma. 3 BHS 4020 Topics in Maternal Child Health The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) issues and topic areas. One to two MCH topics will be discussed weekly. To adequately prepare for class discussion questions and course assignments, students are expected to complete the required readings for each session. This course is designed for individuals who have an interest in working in the area of maternal and child health, program development and intervention. 3 BHS 4031 Statistics for Health Sciences This course is designed to introduce the conceptual foundation of statistical analysis & statistical reasoning of health sciences data, and prepare the student to calculate, interpret and utilize appropriate software packages for basic statistical analysis. 3 BHS 4100 Academic and Professional Writing* (required) The purpose of this course is to strengthen the skills and thought processes students require for successful academic and professional writing. Proper sentence and paragraph structure, grammar, punctuation usage, formatting and bibliographic referencing will be discussed. Students will learn the five chapter model utilized in scholarly writing and be introduced to the fundamentals of APA formatting. * must be taken during the first semester of enrollment in program 3 BHS 4110 Health Care and Aging This course examines the psychosocial and cultural variations associated with maturing and aging. Topics covered will be an overview of life choices, living wills, and treatment, as well as cultural implications of senior care. 3 BHS 4130 Internship The student will complete 40 hours of internship in an area of interest within a health care organization. The final project of this internship will be to produce a S.W.O.T. analysis of the unit or health care organization. Student must receive departmental and advisor approval in order to be allowed to register for this course. 3 BHS 4140 Independent Study Students select an area of study in cooperation with the course advisor and/or program director. The project may include such items as work-related studies, conference attendance, grant proposals and/or planning documents. A comprehensive paper will be developed and delivered according to the NSU B.H.Sc. form and style manual. Student must receive departmental and advisor approval in order to be allowed to register for this course. 3 BHS 4150 Science of Sound This course is designed to introduce students to acoustics. Students will study production of sound waves in general, and more specifically the production of sound waves during speech. Students will also study the characteristics of sound waves, how sound waves are propagated through a medium, and the perception of sound. 3 BHS 4151 Linguistics & Psycholinguistic Variables of Lang. Dev’l. This course will provide an overview of speech and language development as it relates to the typically developing child from birth through adolescence. This course will include topic areas related to the dimensions of communication, neurological and anatomical basis of communication, models of speech and language development, and speech-language differences and diversity. 3 BHS 4152 Neuroanatomy & Neurophysiology of Audition This course will provide an introduction to the gross structure of the brain and spinal cord. Functional relationship of their parts with emphasis on the auditory and vestibular peripheral and central nervous systems will be discussed. 3 BHS 4153 Speech and Language Disorders for Health Care Practitioners Overview of speech and language delays and disorders, their etiology, and treatment. How health-care practitioners can identify persons with possible disorders and make appropriate referrals. Consideration of the communication needs within health-care system of persons with speech-language disorders. 3 BHS 4154 Effect of Hearing Impairment on Speech and Language Phonologic, morphologic, syntactic and pragmatic aspects of human communication associated with hearing impairment. Study of methods of screening hearing-impaired patients for concomitant speech and language disorders. Prerequisite: course in normal language development. 3 BHS 4160 Education for the Health Professions This course will provide an opportunity to explore learning theories, learning styles, testing and assessment, education trends, and utilizing technology in instruction as it relates to the health professional and professions. 3 BHS 5001 APA Writing Seminar This course is designed to introduce students to the APA writing form and style. Students will be guided by an instructor in the use of the APA Publication Manual and the components of an APA style academic paper as well as practicum and internship reports. Students are recommended to take this course because all courses within the BHSc Program and Department of Health Science require that all written assignments be submitted in APA form and style. 3

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Health Science Major | Bachelor of Science Degree | Nova …

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Health Science – Sacramento State Catalog

Page Content

College of Health and Human Services

The academic area of study in Health Science is part of the total program of the College of Health and Human Services. Students pursue a concentration of courses leading to a degree with specialization and job skills applicable to community settings, health care administration, occupational health and safety, and other health related fields. The faculty continues to support the idea of broad based professional preparation such that graduates will have wider appeal in the job market.

Students can expect to be involved, both in class and field experiences, in areas that deal with significant issues such as health care costs, consumer related issues, drug related problems, sexuality related matters, non-intentional injury causes and prevention, and other personal, occupational, and community health and safety issues as well as management, business and administration skills in the health care administration option.

Students interested in pursuing advanced degrees in the broad health sciences will find that the BS program provides the foundation upon which to build MPH, MA or MS in community, health care administration, or occupational health and safety degree programs.

The Health Science program at Sacramento State is one of the most highly sought after programs in Northern California. Due to the large number of applications, the program is now officially impacted. Students wishing to become Health Science majors must complete a series of required lower division courses and must apply for admission to the program. Check the Department website for requirements, and it is highly recommended that interested students speak with a Health Science advisor as soon as possible.

Note: Students who have completed the physician assistant program at UC Davis Medical Center and who wish to obtain a BS degree in Health Science at California State University, Sacramento, should contact the Sacramento State Outreach Office for application and course requirements.

Units required for Major: 58-62 Minimum total units required for BS: 120 All courses must be completed with at least a “C” grade.

Note: Students graduating with a BS in Health Science (all concentrations) will not be subject to the Universitys Foreign Language Graduation Requirement. Students who change major may be subject to the Universitys Foreign Language Graduation Requirement.

Courses in parentheses are prerequisites.

(4)

BIO 25

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

(4)

BIO 26

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (BIO 25 or instructor permission)

(5)

CHEM 6A*

Introduction to General Chemistry (One year high school algebra; high school chemistry strongly recommended)

(3)

STAT 1*

Introduction to Statistics (MATH 9 or three years of high school mathematics which includes two years of algebra and one year of geometry; completion of ELM requirement and the Intermediate Algebra diagnostic test)

(3)

HLSC 114*

Human Ecology and Health

(3)

HLSC 118

Community Health

(3)

HLSC 148

Epidemiology (STAT 1, or instructor permission; must be a Health Sciences or Biological Sciences major or minor )

(3)

HLSC 195

Fieldwork Health or Safety (Permission of faculty advisor, program coordinator and Department chair)

Note: Health Science courses depend upon concentration, permission of the faculty advisor, program coordinator, and department chair.

Select one concentration from the following three options, in addition to requirements above.

(3)

HLSC 100

Fundamentals of Safety and Health (Health Sciences or a Fire Service Management major or minor)

(3)

HLSC 112

Disease Prevention

(3)

HLSC 116

Public Health Administration and Policy

(3)

HLSC 119

Community Health Education (must be a Health Science major or minor; HLSC 118 or instructor permission)

(3)

HLSC 122

Health Psychology (must be a Health Sciences or Child Development major or minor)

(3)

HLSC 124*

Consumer Health Education

(3)

HLSC 130*

Alcohol and Other Drugs

(3)

HLSC 144

Community Health Planning and Evaluation (HLSC 118, HLSC 148; GWAR certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 80+, or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109 M/W, or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109 M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X or WPJ score 70/71 and ENGL 109X or instructor permission)

(3)

HLSC 147

Health Data Analysis (STAT 1 and/or instructor permission)

(3) Select one of the following courses for 3 units:

(3)

ACCY 1

Accounting Fundamentals (Entry Level Math (ELM) test of at least 36 or a CR grade in MLSK 7A)

(3)

ECON 1A*

Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis OR

ECON 1B*

Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

(3)

HLSC 116

Public Health Administration and Policy

(3)

HLSC 144

Community Health Planning and Evaluation (HLSC 118, HLSC 148; GWAR certification before Fall 09, or WPJ score of 80+, or 3-unit placement in ENGL 109 M/W, or 4-unit placement in ENGL 109 M/W and co-enrollment in ENGL 109X or WPJ score 70/71 and ENGL 109X; or instructor permission)

(3)

MKTG 160

Principles of Quality Management

(3)

MGMT 102

Business Communications (Completion of Area A in General Education and ENGL 20; COMS 2 and COMS 4 recommended) OR

COMS 103

Presentational Speaking in the Organization (a general education oral communication course)

Organizational Behavior Competenies. Select two courses from the following for 6 units:

(3)

DS 101

Data Analysis for Managers (MATH 24 , STAT 1)

(3)

HLSC 152

Healthcare Systems and Operations (HLSC 151; HLSC majors only or instructor permission)

(3)

HROB 101

The Management of Contemporary Organizations

(3)

HROB 151

Management of Human Resources

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Health Science – Sacramento State Catalog

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Health Sciences – Weber State University

Why choose Health Sciences at WSU?

An Associate of Science (AS) with an emphasis in:

The majority of our courses are available online or through independent study. Please go to WSU Online for more information.

By individualizing our ASHS tracks, we can help prepare you for your chosen program, while you are earning your Associate of Science degree. This degree will advance your knowledge for any entry level program or profession in a variety of health and/or medical related fields. There are many opportunities in these correlated fields such as: health care accountant, medical illustrator, bilingual health educator, health care technical writer, medical sales, criminal justice worker, music therapist, medical secretary, medical social worker, and many more.

In addition, you will gain an in-depth understanding of the language of medicine, the complexities of the human body, and the response of the biological system to diseases. You will have provided yourself with an enriched education in the health sciences areas from which you can build and advance learning opportunities or any number of careers.

The General Education (GE) requirements of the university are part of the degree, but remember that classes required for General Education are also prerequisites for the health professions programs. All students pursuing an ASHS must complete the core Health Sciences courses, and the remaining courses you complete depend on the track you select. This is an open-enrollment program. The application process is open throughout the academic year, with a $25 program fee.

For more information, please contact us at:

The Health Sciences Department (801) 626-6505 healthsciences@weber.edu

Or visit us at:

Weber State University Dr. Ezekiel R. Dumke College of Health Professions The Health Sciences Department – MH 109 3909 University Circle Ogden, UT 84408-3909

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Health Sciences – Weber State University

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Master in Health Science, Health Science Master Programs

master was rated

10 out of 10 based on 12 rating(s)

Q:Going through Master of Science in Health Sciences, I came across Community Health course. What is taught in it?

A:There are number of courses that you will come across in the two year Master of Science in Health Sciences program. In Community Health course, the special emphasis are laid on issues regarding community health. Students get to study various problems faced in the field and also about the possible solutions.

Q:Can I pursue a health science masters degree over the internet?

A:Yes, students from all around the world can pursue a health science master’s degree online. These programs are specifically designed for students who are already employed or homemakers looking to learn something new. There are a number of online institutions listed on our website that allow students to complete their education from the comfort of their homes. Students also find these online courses relatively inexpensive as there is no travelling and accommodation expenses involved.

Q:Can you name a few specialization areas offered in a master degree in health science?

A:A master degree in health science is a graduate level program that focuses on health related topics. Students can opt for a single health area for specialization in this degree program. Following are a few options available: public health, infectious diseases and health, kinesiology, nutrition, international public health, prevention and cure, and many more.

Q:While searching for master in health science, I came across a course on Pharmacology and Therapeutics. What is included in this course?

A:Course on Pharmacology and Therapeutics would be mentioned when searching for master in health science. This course is usually worth 3 credit hours and deals with the Principals of Pharmacodynamics, Clinical Therapeutics, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacology. With the health care industry expanding all over the United States, there is huge potential for students interested in this qualification.

Q:What is taught in the master health degree program?

A:The Master Health Science degree program is a professional two year degree which can only be opted if the student has completed their undergraduate degree in a related field. Students are taught two types of courses in the degree which include core and elective courses. Core courses focus on introductory content of the program whereas electives are for the chosen area of specialization.

Q:Why should I take the master of health science degree online?

A:The Master Of Health Science degree program offers a number of benefits to those students who take the program online. Students get to make their own class schedule and complete the program at a pace of their own. They do not have to rush through the course to match the speed of the course mates. Online programs also allow students to take the class from anywhere in the world with a single internet connection.

Q:How can I take the master of health science online?

A:The Master Of Health Science Online degree is offered by a number of renowned institutes listed on our website. To get enrolled in an online master in health sciences, students need to select their online institute and apply for admission directly. They will only be required to have completed the bachelor’s degree in a related discipline.

Q:How long is the master of health sciences?

A:The Master Of Health Sciences can be completed ideally within 2 years when opted in a traditional campus based institute. However, students looking to complete the degree in much less time duration can get enrolled in the online program and take as much as they see fit. Online programs have no specified time durations for completing the degree.

Q:What is the duration of the executive masters degree health science?

A:The Masters Degree Health Science is typically for 2 years. However, students who are already working somewhere and are taking up master’s degree to increase their career prospects without giving up on their employment can get enrolled in the executive masters program and complete the degree at a much lighter pace. Generally, executive degrees are completed in 3 years or more since their classes only take place after office hours.

Q:My search on Masters degree in Health Science led me to Clinical Classification Systems course, can you tell me more about it?

A:It is common to come across the reference of various courses and programs relevant to the field while going through search such as Masters degree in Health Science. Clinical Classification Systems course is included in various programs related to Health Sciences. In this course the students get to study nomenclature and classification of coding and systems.

Q:My search related to masters degree in Health Sciences took me to Biomedical Terminology course, what is it about?

A:It is common to come across the reference of various courses and programs relevant to the field while going through search such as Masters degree in Health Sciences. Biomedical Terminology course is included in a number of programs related to Health Sciences. In this course the students get to study about the terminology used in medicines.

Q:Is a Masters in Health Science degree focused on research?

A:Almost all masters’ degrees have a core course component of qualitative and qualitative research methods. In addition to this you will have to submit a research paper applying scientific methods towards the end of your masters program in order to get your degree. You can also opt for a specialization in research administration.

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Master in Health Science, Health Science Master Programs

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Personalized Medicine Conference | Medical Events | 2016 …

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College of Health Sciences – DeVry University

DeVry University’s College of Health Sciences offers degree programs in many in-demand specialties at all levelsfrom undergraduate certificate to associate degree to bachelors degree. DeVry’s programs are designed with input from leading hospitals and professionals active in the healthcare technology industry. Our health sciences degree programs provide hands-on education in areas that can prepare you for success in your field. Through experiential learning, you can gain the skills, knowledge, and experience needed for increased employment eligibility in hospitals, clinics, research firms, and teaching laboratories.

In addition, the College of Health Sciences offers a stackable degree path that allows students to apply all qualifying credits in the Medical Billing and Coding Undergraduate Certificate program to the Associate of Applied Science in Health Information Technology. If you choose to go on to earn a bachelors degree, you can apply the earned credits from the associate degree to the Bachelor of Science in Technical Management with a specialization in Health Information Management.

The College of Health Sciences offers the degree programs listed below. Unless otherwise noted, all health programs are also available online.

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College of Health Sciences – DeVry University

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Genetic counseling | March of Dimes

Genetic counseling is a service to help individuals and families translate scientific knowledge into practical information. A genetic counselor works with a person or family that may be at risk for an inherited disease or abnormal pregnancy outcome, discussing their chances of having children who are affected.

Providers of genetic counseling include:

These health care professionals are experienced in helping families understand birth defects and how inheritance works. They provide information that helps families make personal decisions about pregnancy, child care and genetic testing.

Anyone who has unanswered questions about origins of diseases or traits in the family should consider genetic counseling. People who may find it valuable include:

When you go to see a genetic counselor, he or she:

Often genetic counselors can determine the risk of occurrence or recurrence of a condition and the availability of tests for it.

Evaluation of tests results usually is coordinated between the genetic counselor, the person or couple and the doctor. In the occasional case of troubling results, the counselor will provide information to help you make decisions (for instance, on the risk of having a child or more children). The counselor or the doctor can refer you to resources in your community that deal with a specific genetic condition, or to medical specialists, educational specialists or family support groups.

A family can seek genetic counseling directly or be referred by a physician. Comprehensive genetic services centers are available in the United States, usually located within large medical centers or teaching hospitals. Smaller areas may be served by satellite clinics.

If you think you could benefit from genetic counseling:

There are many organizations that can provide you with guidance and information on a wide variety of topics related to genetics and specific inherited disorders. These are just a few:

March of Dimes – Ask us 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue White Plains, NY 10605 (914) 997-4488 askus@marchofdimes.org

Genetic Alliance 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404 Washington, DC 20008 (202) 966-5557 info@geneticalliance.org

National Society of Genetic Counselors 401 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 321-6834 nsgc@nsgc.org

National Center for Education on Maternal and Child Health P.O. Box 571272 Washington, DC 20057 (202) 784-9770 mchlibrary@ncemch.org

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) P.O. Box 1968 Danbury, CT 06813 (800) 999-6673 (203) 744-0100 RN@rarediseases.org

Last reviewed: December, 2013

Genetic counseling is a service to help individuals and families translate scientific knowledge into practical information. A genetic counselor works with a person or family that may be at risk for an inherited disease or abnormal pregnancy outcome, discussing their chances of having children who are affected.

Providers of genetic counseling include:

These health care professionals are experienced in helping families understand birth defects and how inheritance works. They provide information that helps families make personal decisions about pregnancy, child care and genetic testing.

Anyone who has unanswered questions about origins of diseases or traits in the family should consider genetic counseling. People who may find it valuable include:

When you go to see a genetic counselor, he or she:

Often genetic counselors can determine the risk of occurrence or recurrence of a condition and the availability of tests for it.

Evaluation of tests results usually is coordinated between the genetic counselor, the person or couple and the doctor. In the occasional case of troubling results, the counselor will provide information to help you make decisions (for instance, on the risk of having a child or more children). The counselor or the doctor can refer you to resources in your community that deal with a specific genetic condition, or to medical specialists, educational specialists or family support groups.

A family can seek genetic counseling directly or be referred by a physician. Comprehensive genetic services centers are available in the United States, usually located within large medical centers or teaching hospitals. Smaller areas may be served by satellite clinics.

If you think you could benefit from genetic counseling:

There are many organizations that can provide you with guidance and information on a wide variety of topics related to genetics and specific inherited disorders. These are just a few:

March of Dimes – Ask us 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue White Plains, NY 10605 (914) 997-4488 askus@marchofdimes.org

Genetic Alliance 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404 Washington, DC 20008 (202) 966-5557 info@geneticalliance.org

National Society of Genetic Counselors 401 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago, IL 60611 (312) 321-6834 nsgc@nsgc.org

National Center for Education on Maternal and Child Health P.O. Box 571272 Washington, DC 20057 (202) 784-9770 mchlibrary@ncemch.org

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) P.O. Box 1968 Danbury, CT 06813 (800) 999-6673 (203) 744-0100 RN@rarediseases.org

Last reviewed: December, 2013

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Genetic counseling | March of Dimes

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International Center for Spinal Cord Injury | Kennedy …

Founded in 2005, the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury (ICSCI) represents something remarkable in the field of paralysis treatment: hope.

For many years, experts held that most improvements from spinal cord injuries (SCI) occurred in the first six months of recovery, and that improvement was impossible after two years. Rehabilitation focused mostly on teaching patients how to compensate for injuries they thought to be irreversible. The experts were wrong.

The International Center for Spinal Cord Injury (ICSCI) at Kennedy Krieger Institute was founded on the philosophy that individuals with paralysis can always hope for recovery of sensation, function, mobility, and independence, months and even years after injury. To maximize on this potential for recovery, ICSCI offers an intense, medically-supervised therapy program with a unique focus on Activity-Based Restorative Therapy.ICSCI is one of the first facilities in the world to combine innovative research with a unique focus on restoration and rehabilitation for both children and adults with chronic paralysis.

Transitioning today’s science to near-term therapeutic applications, we focus on developing and applying advanced restoration strategies for optimizing spontaneous recovery in those living with paralysis.

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International Center for Spinal Cord Injury | Kennedy …

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Organogenesis.com – Science – Regenerative Medicine

Regenerative medicine is a multidisciplinary field involving biology, medicine and engineering. It combines the physical nature of a product with living cells.

“Tissue Regeneration,” “Tissue Engineering” and “Regenerative Medicine” are related terms and are sometimes used interchangeably.

Where does regenerative medicine fit into modern medical practice? Current traditional approaches to treat medical diseases include:

These methods are all considered essential, but have their limitations. For example, drugs have unwanted side effects, prosthetics are not biologically active and do not integrate or remodel into the body, surgery is invasive, and organ transplantation is limited by donor availability and toxic immunosuppressive cocktails.

Regenerative medicine is an emerging approach in modern medicine as it delivers living tissue, stimulating the body’s own natural healing process by activating the body’s inherent ability to repair and regenerate. Innovative therapies are now available that aim to heal or reconstruct diseased tissue and support the regeneration of diseased or injured cells and organs.

Doctors use regenerative medicine to speed up healing and to help injuries that will not heal or repair on their own. Regenerative medicine may help heal broken bones, severe burns, chronic wounds, heart damage, nerve damage, and many other diseases.

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Organogenesis.com – Science – Regenerative Medicine

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Biotechnology | Define Biotechnology at Dictionary.com

British Dictionary definitions for biotechnology Expand

/batknld/

(in industry) the technique of using microorganisms, such as bacteria, to perform chemical processing, such as waste recycling, or to produce other materials, such as beer and wine, cheese, antibiotics, and (using genetic engineering) hormones, vaccines, etc

Derived Forms

biotechnological (batknldkl) adjectivebiotechnologically, adverbbiotechnologist, noun

Word Origin and History for biotechnology Expand

also bio-technology, 1947, “use of machinery in relation to human needs;” 1972 in sense of “use of biological processes in industrial production,” from bio- + technology.

biotechnology in Medicine Expand

biotechnology biotechnology (b’-tk-nl’-j) n.

The use of microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeasts, or biological substances, such as enzymes, to perform specific industrial or manufacturing processes. Applications include production of certain drugs, synthetic hormones, and bulk foodstuffs.

The application of the principles of engineering and technology to the life sciences.

biotechnology in Science Expand

The use of a living organism to solve an engineering problem or perform an industrial task. Using bacteria that feed on hydrocarbons to clean up an oil spill is one example of biotechnology.

The use of biological substances or techniques to engineer or manufacture a product or substance, as when cells that produce antibodies are cloned in order to study their effects on cancer cells. See more at genetic engineering.

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Biotechnology | Define Biotechnology at Dictionary.com

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Personalized medicine – ScienceDaily

Currently, much of medical practice is based on “standards of care” that are determined by averaging responses across large cohorts.

The theory has been that everyone should get the same care based on clinical trials.

Personalized Medicine is the concept that managing a patient’s health should be based on the individual patient’s specific characteristics, including age, gender, height/weight, diet, environment, etc.

Potential applications of personalized medicine Personalized medicine aims to identify individuals at risk for common diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

The simple family history has long been used by physicians to identify individuals at increased risk and to advise preventive measures such as lifestyle modifications (changes in diet, cessation of toxic habits, increased exercise) earlier screening, or even prophylactic medications or surgery.

Scientific advancements offer the potential to define an individual’s risk based on their genetic make-up.

Fields of Translational Research termed “-omics” (genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) study the contribution of genes, proteins, and metabolic pathways to human physiology and variations of these pathways that can lead to disease susceptibility.

It is hoped that these fields will enable new approaches to diagnosis, drug development, and individualized therapy.

Pharmacogenetics Pharmacogenetics (also termed pharmacogenomics) is the field of study that examines the impact of genetic variation on the response to medications.

This approach is aimed at tailoring drug therapy at a dosage that is most appropriate for an individual patient, with the potential benefits of increasing the efficacy and safety of medications.

Gene-centered research may also speed the development of novel therapeutics.

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Personalized medicine – ScienceDaily

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Genetics/Genetic Counseling | Rutgers Cancer Institute of …

American Cancer Society: Genetic Testing, What You Need to Know – The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service. Read all about genetic testing at this site.

Cancer.Net: Genetics – This is the patient information Web site of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). It is designed to help patients and families make informed health-care decisions. Comprehensive information on cancer genetics can be found here.

HealthyNJ: Genetics – Although not specific to cancer genetics, you can find valuable information on genetic disorders and testing.

Macmillan Cancer Support: Genetics – This UK based organization helps with all the things that people affected by cancer want and need. Learn about how genes work, how diseases are inherited and the risks for different cancer types at this site.

MedlinePlus: Genetic Counseling – Developed by the National Library of Medicine, this consumer health site directs the user to selected online resources on many common diseases, conditions, and concerns. Also in Spanish.

MedlinePlus: Genetic Testing – Developed by the National Library of Medicine, this consumer health site directs the user to selected online resources on many common diseases, conditions, and concerns. Also in Spanish.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center: Hereditary Cancer & Genetics – Here you will find an overview of hereditary cancer, genetic counseling, testing information, questions and answers about hereditary cancers and recent research findings.

National Cancer Institute: Cancer Genetics – The NCI, established under the National Cancer Act of 1937, is the Federal Government’s principal agency for cancer research and training. This site will provide a wealth of information on cancer genetics and testing.

National Human Genome Research Institute – The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) led the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) contribution to the International Human Genome Project, which had as its primary goal the sequencing of the human genome. Here you can learn about specific genetic diseases and genetic testing, and find tools for gathering your family medical history.

NetWellness: Cancer Genetics – Find out about genes, chromosomes and cancer, genetic tests, genetic counseling or even submit a question on the site’s “Ask and Expert” section.

February 2015

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Alligator Bioscience AB

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Drug Development Candidate ADC-1004 has been shown to reduce myocardial infarction in a porcine ischemia reperfusion injury model. As part of the d

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Alligatorbuilds value by using its proprietary human scFv antibody library ALLIGATOR-GOLD and the FIND technology platform to develop innovative antibody-based immuno-oncology compounds for unmet medical needs within cancer. Alligator Bioscience is focusing on discovery and early development phases and is growing an attractive pipeline of drug development candidates in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. ALLIGATOR-GOLD is a fully human synthetic kappa scFv library with large diversity (10 billion unique clones). ALLIGATOR-GOLD has been validated by selection of functionally active antibodies with sub-nanomolar affinities against several targets. FIND (Fragment Induced Diversity) technology is a powerful in vitro based antibody and protein optimization technology that creates functional libraries from which optimal variants of potential drug development candidates can be selected. ALLIGATOR-GOLD and FIND are fully integrated to give Alligator Bioscience the competitive advantage to develop immuno-oncology compounds with higher probability of success.

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ADC-1013 is an antibody-based immunotherapy, inducing anti-tumor immune effects through the activation of CD40 on antigen-presenting cells. ADC-1013 is currently in clinical phase I: safety and tolerability is assessed in a clinical trial of late stage cancer patients at 5 clinical sites in Europe. ADC-1013 was out-licensed to Janssen Biotech in August 2015.

ADC-1015 is a bispecific immuno-oncology compound. The drug candidate is based on the concept that the properties of two complementary immune activatingentities, OX40 and CTLA-4,are united into one moleculeto induce superior immune activation. Manufacturing for clinical trials was initiated in January 2016. ADC-1015 is currently in pre-clinical development.

ADC-1016 is a bispecific tumor-localizing immunotherapy, composed of one tumor-targeting moiety and one immune activatingmoiety. Immune activation is dependent on binding to the tumor target which reduces the risk of systemic toxicity. ADC-1016 is in late research phase.

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