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Antidepressants As Treatment Immediately Following A Stroke?

Story Summary: Kunlin Jin, Xiaomei Wang, Lin Xie and Xiao Mao, showed that the brain attempts to heal itself following stroke by growing new neurons, but it has not been shown clearly that those new neurons improve function. Clot busting drugs, which have to be given within hours of the stroke, have been of great benefit to a small number of patients, but stroke is not usually diagnosed in time for them to be used. Building on the Institutes collaborative approach to research involving other age-related disorders, Greenberg says its also likely that the impact of the growth of new neurons will be examined in animal models of Alzheimers, Parkinsons and Huntingtons disease. He says those suffering from stroke should not treat themselves, even with FDA-approved drugs, without medical advice. Even taking something as seemingly innocuous as an antidepressant carries the possibility of making someone worse. These drugs need to be tested in a controlled clinical setting. Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. But many of the 11 million Americans that have both conditions dont get the treatment they need. Keeping a Personal Medical RecordMedical information is usually scattered in many different places. To receive the best possible health care, people are encouraged to gather information in one place and create a personal medical record….Read the Full Story

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  2. NSF Early Career Award Won By UDs Zhuang For Research On How Cells Bypass Damaged DNA
  3. Inovio Biomedical Awarded Grant From Pennsylvania Department Of Health For Hepatitis C Virus DNA Vaccine Research


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

2 Hopkins scientists awarded European honorary doctorates

Story Summary: The Board of Research of Karolinska stated, Professor Feinbergs work saves lives and he personally encourages other researchers to push the boundaries of knowledge in biology and medicine. The various members of the TRP family of proteins have transformed our understanding about how animals, ranging from insects to humans, detect a broad array of sensory stimuli. Recently, the Montell group revealed the cellular mechanism underlying an early childhood neurodegenerative disease, mucolipidosis type IV, providing a novel strategy for treating this disease. The research community at Johns Hopkins is proud that both Andy and Craig have received such honors, says Stephen Desiderio, M. D. , Ph. Situated in the heart of Western Europe, the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven was founded in 1425 by Pope Martin V and is the oldest existing Catholic university in the world. Previous recipients of Leuvens honorary degree include Nobel Prize-winning scientists, religious pioneers and noteworthy politicians, including Louis Pasteur, Alexander Fleming, Christian de Duve, Charles De Gaulle, Winston Churchill and Dwight Eisenhower….Read the Full Story

Related posts:

  1. European Honorary Doctorates Awarded To 2 Hopkins Scientists
  2. Hopkins scientists picked for cancer dream teams – Johns Hopkins Gazette
  3. Johns Hopkins Researchers Awarded $8 Million For HIV Research


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Hopkins Researchers Put Proteins Right Where They Want Them-4/14/10

Story Summary: Their research, published Feb. 14 in Nature Methods,expands on a more limited method using a chemical tool to move proteins inside of cells to the periphery, a locale known as the plasma membrane. Where a particular protein is activated and the timing of that activation influence how a cell responds to outside stimulus, says Takanari Inoue, Ph. Chemical signaling inside cells connects protein molecules through complex feedback loops and crosstalk, Inoue says, so knowing exactly how each protein contributes to which signals at what locations requires the ability to rapidly move proteins of interest to specific organelles found in cells. They cut out the mailing address — known as a targeting sequence — that formerly delivered the protein unit to the plasma membrane and replaced it with new addresses (targeting sequences) that shipped it instead to specific organelles. We were able to manipulate protein activities in situ and very rapidly on each individual organelle, Inoue said. Ultimately, this will help us to better understand protein function at these critical cellular components….Read the Full Story

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  1. Johns Hopkins Scientists Pull Proteins Tail to Curtail Cancer- 12/30/08
  2. Johns Hopkins Scientists Pull Proteins Tail to Curtail Cancer- 12/30/08
  3. Researchers From The Centre For Genomic Regulation (CRG) Describe A New Secretory Pathway For Proteins


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Identification Of Additional Genes Associated With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Story Summary: Results of this large-scale collaborative study, supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published online April 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Genome-wide association studies require large numbers of patients to discover significant genetic associations. Researchers have previously discovered genes that account for a significant portion of AMD risk through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which scan the entire DNA of individuals to uncover genetic variations related to certain diseases. HDLs are among a family of lipoproteins that transport essential fats, such as cholesterol, through the bloodstream. It is believed that early stages of AMD are affected by accumulation of oxidation products of cholesterol and other lipids in the retinal pigment epithelium, a layer of cells in the back of the eye. However, the relationship between HDL cholesterol levels in the blood and AMD is still unclear. Source: National Eye Institute NIH/National Eye Institute Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Thyroxine (T4) is a hormone produced by the thyroid gland that has four. But does that mean a life of looking for lost glasses? But does that mean a life of looking for lost glasses? But does that mean a life of looking for lost glasses? What Is a Cataract?When you reach a certain age, its usually clear that your vision isnt as sharp as it used to be. What Is a Cataract?When you reach a certain age, its usually clear that your vision isnt as sharp as it used to be. What Is a Cataract?When you reach a certain age, its usually clear that your vision isnt as sharp as it used to be. What Is a Cataract?When you reach a certain age, its usually clear that your vision isnt as sharp as it used to be. Learn how surgery for the cloudy lens of a cataract can restore vision. Learn how surgery for the cloudy lens of a cataract can restore vision….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Genome scientist Dr. Jay Shendure receives Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award

Story Summary: Shendure, 35, received The Lowell Milken Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award, named for the chair and co-founder of The Milken Family Foundation, a private philanthropy for education and medical research. These approaches overcome many previous technical hurdles, with results published in Nature, Science, and other prominent scientific journals. Shendure is intent on designing more rapid, less expensive next-generation DNA-sequencing technologies for prostate cancer research. He hopes to provide pathologists and oncologists with enhanced resolution of genetic variation in regions of the genome that code for proteins, as well as for structural variation. D. degree in genetics in 2005 from Harvard University and an M. D. degree from Harvard Medical School in 2007. We look forward to seeing the contributions these young scientists will make in our field. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is the worlds largest philanthropic source of support for accelerating some of the worlds most promising research in prostate cancer. The UW and Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center are part of this consortium The consortium enrolls patients in clinical trials for new therapies for prostate cancer. The foundation also advocates for governmental support for basic, translational and clinical cancer research. Its most dangerous form can sometimes spread to bones or to other organs….Read the Full Story

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  2. Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awards prestigious fellowships to 11 top young scientists
  3. Medical News: Gene Fusion Drives Prostate Cancer Urine Test – in Hematology/Oncology, Prostate Cancer from MedPage Today


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Antibody selection method could mean better drugs

Story Summary: The research was published online March 22 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (In print April 6, Vol. The key to the experiments are integrins, which are proteins expressed by the bodys immune cells — in this case, cells called neutrophils — that allow the cells to travel to a cut, infection or other source of inflammation. Integrins are receptor molecules located on the cell surface that are like velcro that can be turned on and off. When they are chemically signaled to activate, they subtly change shape, called conformation, thereby exposing binding sites allowing them to firmly attach to receptors around them. Immune cells, which normally fight infection, flock to an area and cause painful swelling. Thats why these drugs can make patients weak and susceptible to infections. The new antibodies leave alone the cells with integrins in a resting state — those that are just waiting to be needed for an immune response. This would greatly cut down on the side effects associated with immunosuppressive drugs. Therapies and treatments that could result from this research are numerous, said research associate and first author Xuebo Hu. Also, the antibodies could be fluorescently tagged to image, for example, inflammation or metastasized tumors….Read the Full Story

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  3. The Childrens Hospital Of Philadelphia: New Gene Searching Method Uncovers Possible New Targets For Crohns Disease Drugs


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Study Offers First Clinical Evidence Of Anti-Cancer Drug Triggering Viral Infection

Story Summary: Gulley is a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Burkitt lymphoma is an aggressive, fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that often occurs in children. The patients ranged in age from 5-15 and were under treatment with cyclophosphamide for their cancer. The next step, explains Gulley, is to design a clinical trial using both cytoxan and an antiviral agent simultaneously. Other UNC scientists involved in the study are members of the departments of pathology, otolaryngology, and medicine/infectious disease division. Additional collaborators are affiliated with Kamuzu Central Hospital and the UNC Malawi Project, and Dr. Shannon Kenney who was Sarah Graham Kenan professor at UNC before joining the departments of medicine and oncology at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. Living with Breast CancerThere are many options for treating breast cancer, including surgery, hormonal treatments, radiation and chemotherapy. All of these treatments have potential physical and emotional side effects. All of these treatments have potential physical and emotional side effects. Discover how two women went through treatment and what they did to cope….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Is Chemistry Incompatible with Web 2.0?

A recent ChemJobber post notes that C&E News Editor-in-Chief Rudy Baum’s editorials sometimes have a tendency to approach the controversial – and sometimes the purely political.  I wanted to discuss this weeks editorial which threatens to call into question much of my online existence (sorry, Mitch.  If Rudy’s right, I think you’re about to spontaneously e-implode).

In this week’s editorial, “The Limits of Web 2.0,” Baum decries the cliché “information wants to be free” for both its out-of-context usage (the full quote says information wants to be expensive because it is valuable and free because the cost of information dissemination is shrinking almost hourly – thus a struggle) and for its lunacy (information can’t wish for anything – it’s inanimate).  Rather, Baum says that it’s people who wish that information would be free.  I’d amend Baum’s correction slightly.  People really want information to be free and readily accessible.  I’d argue public libraries have long made most information “free,” if you were willing to do the legwork to get it.

But the bulk of Baum’s editorial promotes Jaron Lanier’s book You are Not a Gadget: A Manefesto, and summarizes Lanier’s main points, namely that the wisdom of crowds can be dangerous and science should be loath to adopt web 2.0 ideals.  Lanier points out that around the turn of century, a “torrent (a word hijacked by the web 2.0 crowd -ed.) of petty designs sometimes called web 2.0″ flooded the web.  And through the use of web 2.0, we apparently are losing sight of the trees for the forest, er, the taggers for the cloud.

Baum writes in his editorial (cross-posted for free on the web 2.0 CENtral Science blog, natch), “The essence of what Lanier is saying is that individuals are important and that we’re losing sight of that at our own peril in elevating the wisdom of the crowd to a higher plane than the creativity of a single person.”  That is, we are valuing the cloud more than the individuals, when the cloud can’t exist – and has no meaning – without the existence of the individuals.  Lanier notes that collective intelligence can be used well, but only when guided by individuals who can direct the course of the hive mind and help steer clear of common groupthink pitfalls.

But the most interesting quote comes near then end, when Baum quotes Lanier as saying that scientific communities “achieve quality through a cooperative process that includes checks and balances, and ultimately rests on a foundation of goodwill and ‘blind’ elitism.”  I’m not really sure what that means…

But to Lanier’s thesis that science ought to be wary of embracing web 2.0 and its ideals, I find it interesting that Baum writes his editorial at C&E News, the magazine of the ACS, whose flagship publication, the Journal of the American Chemical Society, has featured a JACS? page for some time now.  The same C&E News whose blog has become so popular that it had to split off into several child blogs.  Where each post for each ACS article has links to share the article on one of several social networking sites.  Where scientists can now browse their favorite article on their iphones with ACSMobile.  While perhaps late to the party in some areas, the American Chemical Society has certainly ‘logged on’ to web 2.0 as a way to export content to the web-savvy scientist.

Plus, we have our own Mitch, a one man walking encapsulation of web 2.0.  His most successful application is, in my opinion, the chemical forums, which typically sees between 8,000 and 11,000 visitors per day.  This blog seems to be a big hit, and his ChemFeeds is a one-stop source for your aggregated list of your favorite journals’ graphical abstracts.  All this innovation on Mitch’s part earned him an interview with David Bradley (of ScienceBase) in his chemistry WebMagazine, Reactive Reports.

There’s also the Chemistry Reddit as another outlet of chemistry news and notes.

In the inaugural issue of Nature Chemistry, the Nature Publishing Group recounted how they have completely bought into web 2.0 as a means of science communication – each issue of Nature Chemistry even features a roundup of their favorite posts from the chemical blogosphere (which reminds me, to the left, Mitch has also created an aggregated rss feed of several popular chemistry blogs).

And, of course, web 2.0 in the sciences has been discussed in the blogs several times over the years.  We have over 3 pages of posts categorized Web 2.0, mostly Mitch’s posts on new web 2.0 platforms he’s developed.  Jean-Claude Bradley writes about web 2.0 in response to a very interesting post at Nascent, a blog from the folks at Nature.

So, all of these prove that web 2.0 has been talked about many times in the context of science.  Has it worked?  With the exception of blogs, sadly I’m inclined to say no.  At least not yet.  And even with blogs (with the possible exception of All Things Metathesis, and In the Pipeline, though Derek isn’t allowed to talk about his work b/c of intellectual property issues), not a lot of academic or industry leaders are prone to blogging.  It’s not like we’re reading Phil Baran’s blog and getting inside his head on a daily basis.

Sure, there is a subculture of people who are active on the web 2.0 scene, but it surely hasn’t taken off as a medium for all chemists to enjoy.  It theoretically should.  Chemists are always benefited from communal sharing of results and information.  But there are still (and probably always will be) people who seem reluctant to join the new technological paradigm.  I like the way Timo Hannay words it in his post on Nascent,

“But it’s not up to the doubters to ‘get it’, it is up to those of us who support these developments to demonstrate their value. And if we can’t then they don’t deserve to be adopted and we don’t deserve to be heard.”

Especially if there are people at the position of Editor-in-Chief for arguably the top chemistry magazine denouncing the web 2.0 movement, clearly it has a ways to go before it will be appreciated by all to the point where web 2.0 is ‘taken for granted,’ where we don’t even realize what we’re doing when we post results and opinions via web 2.0 technologies.

Let’s get moving!


Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Sequence is scaffold to study sleeping sickness

Story Summary: The team have generated a high-quality draft genome sequence for the strain of Trypanosoma bruceithat is responsible for almost all reported cases of human African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness. The study is published on April 13 in the open access journal, PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. And, is there anything in the T. b. gambiensegenome that might explain its ability to infect and thrive in human populations?Historically, sleeping sickness has been a severely neglected disease, says Dr Matt Berriman, leader of the Parasite Genomics group at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and an author on the study, with considerable impact on human health and the wellbeing and prosperity of communities. With two high quality reference genome sequences in place for the T. bruceistrains, the search for those small genetic differences is given a boost. It is this search that will fuel the pursuit of targeted drug treatments to tackle T. b. gambiense. Patients are often wary of treatment because the side effects of current treatments can be unpleasant and sometimes severe. Trypanosomes possess a very effective set of proteins – called VSGs – which reside at the surface of the cell and can form a kind of invisibility cloak to protect the parasite from immune response. So we were surprised to find that as many as 88 per cent of VSGs remained consistent between our T. b. bruceiand T. b. gambiensegenomes. It means that researchers can produce a global library of VSGs found in T. bruceistrains, allowing them to categorise T. bruceistrains found in the field according the precise set of VSGs they possess. It means that researchers can produce a global library of VSGs found in T. bruceistrains, allowing them to categorise T. bruceistrains found in the field according the precise set of VSGs they possess. This catalogue of VSGs might also provide further clues to human infectivity. The high quality reference sequences for the two subspecies of T. bruceilay the foundation for epidemiological studies looking at multiple samples. The high quality reference sequences for the two subspecies of T. bruceilay the foundation for epidemiological studies looking at multiple samples. The high quality reference sequences for the two subspecies of T. bruceilay the foundation for epidemiological studies looking at multiple samples….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

How Salmonella Sabotages Host Cells

Story Summary: First, the bacterial cell assembles a needle-like structure on its surface, to deliver the virulence proteins. Once the hole is created, the bacterial cell recognises the pH of the host cell and this switches off the safety catch. This then allows the virulence proteins to be delivered through the hole into the host cell. The lead author of the study, Professor David Holden from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London, explained: The way in which a Salmonella cell delivers its virulence proteins to a host cell is a bit like the way in which a parked aeroplane delivers its passengers to a terminal building. On a plane theres a safety catch to prevent the doors opening before the bridge is ready, to stop the passengers falling out onto the tarmac. Similarly, the bacterial cell holds back delivery of its proteins using a molecular safety catch, until it senses that the pore has been assembled. This process is crucial for Salmonella, because if it cannot deliver these proteins properly it cannot establish an infection, added Professor Holden, whose work was supported by grants from the MRC and the Wellcome Trust. Source: Laura Gallagher Imperial College London Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

MiRNA-21 linked to tumor suppressor loss, herceptin resistance

Story Summary: org713-516-4855Biopsy MicroRNA that blocks PTEN makes drug less potent against breast cancerWASHINGTON, D. C. – Overexpression of a specific type of microRNA can derail treatment by disabling an important molecular brake on breast cancer cell proliferation, according to evidence presented by researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center at the American Association for Cancer Research 101st Annual Meeting 2010. The study showed that MiRNA-21 interferes with trastuzumab (Herceptin) therapy by blocking the phosphates and tensing homolog gene known as PTEN. D. , professor and deputy chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology. Herceptin is a targeted therapy used to treat metastatic breast cancer. Like other targeted cancer treatments, Herceptin homes in on a specific abnormal gene to slow or shut down cancer growth. The target gene in Herceptin treatment is ErbB-2-also known as HER2/neu or HER2. The researchers found that cells with higher levels of miRNA-21 had reduced PTEN expression and were significantly more resistant to the drug than were the control cells. The researchers also determined that miRNA-21 reduces PTEN expression by inhibiting PTEN messenger RNA at a specific site in the PTEN transcript in breast cancer cells. In another experiment, when the researchers downregulated miRNA-21 in high HER2-expressing cells, cellular PTEN levels rose, and the cells became more sensitive to Herceptin compared to control miRNA cells. The researchers then sought to determine the clinical relevance of their findings by measuring levels of miRNA-21 in tumor samples from patients with HER2-positive breast cancer treated with Herceptin. Rehman also observed that patients with low tumor levels of miRNA-21 tend to experience either a partial response to Herceptin or stable disease. D. , and Hua Guo, M. D. , Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and Wen-Chien Huang, M. D. , a surgeon from Taiwan who worked for two years in Yus lab as a visiting physician-scientist. Yu also directs the Cancer Biology Program in GSBS, which is a joint endeavor of M. D. Anderson and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Yu also directs the Cancer Biology Program in GSBS, which is a joint endeavor of M. D. Anderson and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Yu also directs the Cancer Biology Program in GSBS, which is a joint endeavor of M. D. Anderson and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Plant pathogen genetically tailors attacks to each part of its host (w/ Video)

Story Summary: This establishes a new principle in plant pathology, that a pathogen can tailor its attack to specifically exploit the tissue or organ properties where it is growing, said Virginia Walbot, professor of biology and senior author of a paper published in Science detailing the study. You need Flash installed to watch this ideoUp until now, pathologists had always assumed that when a pathogen went on the attack, it used every weapon it had, no matter which part of an organism it was infecting. But Walbots team found that only about 30 percent of the genes in the corn smut genome are always activated, or expressed, regardless of whether it is in seedlings, adult leaves or the tassel. The other 70 percent of the genome is what the fungus would pick and choose from, depending on the tissue it was infecting. We hope that other people working on pathogensof all types will go back now and ask, when the pathogen is found in different parts of the body, is it actually using different weapons? Pathologists generally collect their samples from the same, characteristic place on the organism they are studying. But as a result, Walbot said, when researchers happen to find the pathogen in another place in the organism, they generally dont test whether the pathogen is doing different things. It may be just the specialization of modern pathology which has resulted in the whole organism context being overlooked, she said. I think that holds great promise for reducing the damage done to the patient in the course of drug treatment. Walbot got interested in researching the possibility that pathogens might vary their attack while doing fieldwork on a different project for which she was evaluating some mutant strains of maize. Through a series of experiments with different maize mutants, she determined that the key factor in determining whether – or how intensely – corn smut infected a given part of a plant was the potential for growth of that particular type of tissue. The key aspect was the potential – if a mutant grew only small leaves and then quickly stopped growing, the corn smut wasnt interested, even if there was sufficient area to host some tumors. Walbot tested how various mutant strains of corn smut behaved when infecting normal maize plants. She discovered that a strain that was highly effective in causing tumors in, say, the tassels might be completely ineffective in triggering tumors in a seedling. We found genetic evidence from both the pathogen and the host that depending on the growth potential, in an organ-specific way, of both the pathogen and the host, you could modulate the number of tumors, Walbot said. We had proof from the microarray that paralleled the genetic proof; that is, that there is organ-specific expression by maize in response to corn smut, and corn smut expresses a specific suite of genesdepending on where it is in the plant, Walbot said. In Mexico, the fungus is called huitlacoche, and the tumors, which are used in cooking, are sometimes purposely grown on ears of corn. That is just a prediction, she said, but I think pathologists will be quick to pounce on this. Doehlemann received a short-term travel grant from the European Molecular Biology Organization to fund a 10-week visit to Stanford in spring quarter 2009. Is it because of the gene for antibiotic resistance thats characteristic of most types of bacterial plasmids?Chromosomal Crossing OverApr 12, 2010 In most of the books Ive read, chromosomal cross over has been described as simply segments of the chromosome breaking off and reattaching, but I have a bit of difficulty with this explanation. State 4 RespirationApr 11, 2010 i was undertaking a question regarding a patient who had a mutation in their mitochondria, and hence experienced lethargy. Its a part of an optional assignment I have been working on for extra credit. Everything else is complete and I have been milling this one over for about a week without. com) — With colony collapse disorder continuing to plague commercial beekeepers in many parts of the country, University of Wisconsin-Madison experts are studying whether native pollinators can supply . . ….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

NSF Early Career Award Won By UDs Zhuang For Research On How Cells Bypass Damaged DNA

Story Summary: We expect that the knowledge we gain from this study will contribute to the further deciphering of ubiquitins role in how cells respond to damaged DNA. Currently we are working to dissect the different steps in the process of translesion synthesis with a focus on the role of ubiquitin modification, Zhuang says. Our findings from this investigation will further inform our ongoing research on human cancerdevelopment and therapy. The projects outreach component seeks to spark the scientific curiosity and career aspirations of high-school students, with particular emphasis on underrepresented minorities in chemistry and biology, through the virtual reality visualization system called the CAVE at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute. This will help them to understand how the remarkable polymerases tolerate damaged DNA, Zhuang says. Im very excited and honored to receive this award, Zhuang says. There are lots of things to accomplish in both the research and outreach programs, and we are looking forward to making progress on both ends. Zhuang also recently won a Delaware Health Sciences Alliance (DHSA) pilot project grant for research to discover inhibitors that can lead to the development of potent, new anti-cancer drugs. Zhuang received his bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Sichuan University in China and his doctorate from the University of New Mexico. Contact Our News EditorsFor any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Do Genes Play A Role In PTSD? Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Figuring out what was triggering her headaches helped Cathy and her doctor come up with a successful treatment plan. Figuring out what was triggering her headaches helped Cathy and her doctor come up with a successful treatment plan….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

European Honorary Doctorates Awarded To 2 Hopkins Scientists

Story Summary: The Board of Research of Karolinska stated, Professor Feinbergs work saves lives and he personally encourages other researchers to push the boundaries of knowledge in biology and medicine. The various members of the TRP family of proteins have transformed our understanding about how animals, ranging from insects to humans, detect a broad array of sensory stimuli. Recently, the Montell group revealed the cellular mechanism underlying an early childhood neurodegenerative disease, mucolipidosis type IV, providing a novel strategy for treating this disease. The research community at Johns Hopkins is proud that both Andy and Craig have received such honors, says Stephen Desiderio, M. D. , Ph. Source: Maryalice YakutchikJohns Hopkins Medical Institutions Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Do Genes Play A Role In PTSD? Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. Simply click the link below and select the follow option….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Researchers found breast cancer survival gene

Story Summary: The study found that a variant in the OCA2 gene is associated with increased survival in breast cancer patients. Traditional ways of predicting survival and treatment response in cancer patients are not always successful or accurate. This study analysed 3,700 breast cancer patients for this specific change in the OCA2 genetic sequence. This is a very powerful study due to the large number of patients and genetic variants evaluated, said Professor Chenevix-Trench. It is curious that the gene that is also responsible for blue eye colour seems to influence outcome for breast cancer patients. There is no evidence that women with particular skin, hair or eye colouring have a different outcome from breast cancer. The research was led by Dr Paul Pharoah from the University of Cambridge and completed in collaboration with Breast CancerAssociation Consortium researchers from Europe and the USA. Alterations in the genes known as BRCAI and BRCAII are a major . . . Research published in the online journal Breast Cancer Research suggests that if a w . . . Variable times of fluApr 11, 2010 How could it be possible that colds are more intense during certain times of the day? This does leave me. . . How does thinking create action potentials?Apr 11, 2010 Hello guys, I dont know much about brain and stuff I only know a bit about action potential. What allows our brains to retain bits of information (while forgetting others) for years and years? Excessive cleanliness is to blame according to Dr. Guy Delespesse, a professor at . . . They found that women who were made to feel jealous were so distracted by unpleasant emotional images they became . . ….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Brain Development Steered By Newly Discovered RNA

Story Summary: This research will be published online April 15 in the journal Nature. This neurotransmitter binds to a receptor on the neuron surface and then sets in motion a chain of events that affects the genetic activity of the cell. This in turn helps to modify the synaptic connections between neurons, which are the basis of learning and memory. They discovered that there were individual and disparate stretches of DNA that appeared to be amplifying the genes activity, escalating the process of messenger RNA and protein production. Most important, however, was the discovery that these enhancer regions accomplished this phenomenon by producing their own RNA molecules, and that these enhancer RNAs, or eRNAs, were intensifying the enzymatic processes that are essential for a genes ability to create protein. What weve discovered here is how widespread this phenomenon is. Weve found that there are thousands of these enhancers, that theyre spread throughout the genome, and that they are essential to the process in which experience results in new synaptic connections. Whats more, we suspect that theyre active in many other mammalian cell types, not just neurons. Written by David Cameron Full Citation:Nature, April 14, 2010, early online publication Widespread transcription at neuronal activity-regulated enhancers Tae-Kyung Kim1*{, Martin Hemberg2*, Jesse M. Gray1*, Allen M. Costa1, Daniel M. Bear1, Jing Wu3, David A. Harmin1,4, Mike Laptewicz1, Kellie Barbara-Haley5, Scott Kuersten6, Eirene Markenscoff-Papadimitriou1{, Dietmar Kuhl7, Haruhiko Bito8, Paul F. Worley3, Gabriel Kreiman2 & Michael E. Greenberg1 1-Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. 2-Department of Ophthalmology, Childrens Hospital Boston, Center for Brain Science and Swartz Center for Theoretical Neuroscience, Harvard University, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. 4-Childrens Hospital Informatics Program at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. 7-Institute for Molecular and Cellular Cognition (IMCC), Center for Molecular Neurobiology (ZMNH), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Falkenried 94, 20251 Hamburg, Germany. 8-Department of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. K. ); Graduate Program in Neuroscience, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94123, USA (E. M. -P. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Why Some Brains Are More Vulnerable To Stress And Resistant To Antidepressants14 Jan 2010A new study provides insight into the molecular characteristics that make a brain susceptible to anxiety and depression and less likely to respond to treatment with antidepressant medication. Meningitis OverviewEach year you hear about small outbreaks of meningitis….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Genetic Mutation Elevates Risk Of Stress-Induced Depression In Mouse Model

Story Summary: This model has good validity for understanding depression in the human, in particularly in cases of stress-induced depression, which is a fairly widespread phenomenon says Dr. Alessandro Bartolomucci, the first author of the research published in the journal, Disease Models and Mechanisms(DMM). There is a clear relationship between a short form of the serotonin transporter and a very high vulnerability to develop clinical depression when people are exposed to increasing levels of stressful life events. says Dr. Bartolomucci, This is one of the first studies performed in mice that only have about 50% of the normal activity of the transporter relative to normal mice, which is exactly the situation that is present in humans with high vulnerability to depression. Mice with the genetic change were more likely to develop characteristics of depression and social anxiety, which researchers measure by their degree of activity and their response to meeting new mice. Dr. Bartolomucci points out that many of the chemical changes they measured occurred in the areas of the brain that regulate memory formation, emotional responses to stimuli and social interactions, which might be expected. What we were surprised by was the magnitude of vulnerability that we observed in mice with the genetic mutation and the selectivity of its effects. The study is published in Volume 3 issue 7/8 of the research journal, Disease Models & Mechanisms (DMM), published by The Company of Biologists, a non-profit organisation based in Cambridge, UK. Contact Our News EditorsFor any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form. Learn how light can help chase away the winter blues. Treating Major DepressionMajor depression is more than just suffering from a bad mood….Read the Full Story

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Ethicon Endo-Surgery to Introduce New Echelon(TM) Flex 45 Endopath(R) Stapler for System-Wide Compression and Natural Articulation

Story Summary: Endocutters are used to cut and staple tissue in a variety of surgical procedures, including bariatric, thoracic, colorectal, gynecologic, urologic and general surgery. Proper staple formation is necessary to achieve a leak-proof and hemostatic staple line. (ii) EES staplers are uniquely designed with system-wide compression to gently and uniformly compress along the entire length of targeted tissue. When staples are malformed or dont seem secure, it can cause concern and may result in additional intervention from the surgeon to remove and replace them, said , M. D. * at North Louisiana Surgery Center & School of Medicine at Shreveport. The reliability of staple lines, particularly in thick tissue, is an important element in the overall success of a surgical procedure. Understanding the properties of living tissue is critical to the EES approach to surgical stapling as devices are specially designed to minimize trauma so that tissue can return to its natural state once the pressure is removed. About Ethicon Endo-Surgery Ethicon Endo-Surgery develops and markets advanced medical devices for minimally invasive and open surgical procedures, focusing on procedure-enabling devices for the interventional diagnosis and treatment of conditions in general and bariatric surgery, as well as gastrointestinal health, gynecology and surgical oncology. (i) IMS data report(ii) Thick tissue defined as 3mm to 5mm as measured with an 8g/mm(2) thickness measuring device….Read the Full Story

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Novel strategy for generating induced pluripotent stem cells for clinical use is safe and efficient, study finds

Story Summary: Novel Strategy for Generating Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Clinical Use Is Safe and Efficient, Study Finds A new technique for reprogramming human adult cells could greatly improve the safety and efficiency of producing patient-specific stem cells for use in a range of therapeutic applications to repair or replace damaged or diseased tissues, according to new research. A description of this innovative strategy is published in the peer-reviewed journal Cellular Reprogramming, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Stem cells offer great promise for use in cellular therapy to regenerate specific cell populations in the body. The ability to derive stem cells from a patients own tissue eliminates the risk that they will stimulate an immune response and be rejected after transplantation. The authors, Yang Li, Hongxi Zhao, Feng Lan, Andrew Lee, Liu Chen, Changsheng Lin, Yuanqing Yao, and Lingsong Li, from Peking University and the Fourth Military Medical University, Tangdu Hospital, in the Peoples Republic of China, and Stanford University School of Medicine, in Stanford, California, demonstrated the pluripotency of these gut-derived stem cells and their ability to form cell types of all three germ layers. This difference provides us with an important new opportunity to study the mechanisms involved in reprogramming, says Professor Sir Ian Wilmut, OBE, FRS, FRSE, Editor-in-Chief of Cellular Reprogramming and director of the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh. Story Source:Adapted from materials provided by , via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS. Journal Reference:Yang Li, Hongxi Zhao, Feng Lan, Andrew Lee, Liu Chen, Changsheng Lin, Yuanqing Yao, Lingsong Li….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Practice Makes Perfect For Stem Cells

Story Summary: In a new study, researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science have found that reprogramming is imperfect in the early stages of differentiation, with some genes turned on and off at random. As cell divisions continue, the stability of the differentiation process increases by a factor of 100. If the programming of a reporter gene was perfectly transmitted from parent to daughter cell, then the follicle cells would express the gene at the same level after each division. Spradling explains that the mechanism by which the reprogramming and stabilization occurs is not well understood, but their research confirmed the expectation that at least some of the critical changes take place in the gene-bearing chromosomes themselves, rather than in external factors such as the cells environment or signals from other cells. Most likely the reprogramming alters proteins on the chromosome which package the DNA and control which genes are expressed. Changes in chromosome structure, as opposed to changes in the genes themselves, that can be passed on from one generation to the next are called epigenetic changes. But the amount of epigenetic information transmitted at different stages of cellular differentiation remains little known. Source: Allan Spradling Carnegie Institution Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Source: Allan Spradling Carnegie Institution Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions. Contact Our News EditorsFor any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Own Stem Cells Help Boy With Rare Condition Grow New Cheekbones13 Oct 2009In a groundbreaking tissue engineering procedure, doctors in the US used the patients own stem cells to help a 14-year old boy with a rare rare genetic condition that left him with underdeveloped and partly missing cheekbones grow new facial bone. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. Simply click the link below and select the follow option. It causes a persons breathing to stop for up to 10 or 20 seconds – hundreds of times a night. It causes a persons breathing to stop for up to 10 or 20 seconds – hundreds of times a night….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Additional genes associated with age-related macular degeneration identified

Story Summary: Results of this large-scale collaborative study, supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published online April 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. AMD is a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in older Americans. The strongest AMD genetic association found in the study was in a region on chromosome 22, near a gene called metalloproteinase inhibitor 3 (TIMP3). The study has also shed light on a new biological pathway for AMD disease development, by uncovering two genes associated with AMD risk in the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol pathway: human hepatic lipase (LIPC) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP). Scientists identified two additional genes, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and ATP binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), that may be involved in the cholesterol pathway as well, but more research is needed to confirm these findings. However, the relationship between HDL cholesterol levels in the blood and AMD is still unclear. Nonetheless, we have uncovered a major biochemical pathway that may be a target for future AMD treatments. Story Source:Adapted from materials provided by . Journal Reference:Wei Chen et al. Genetic variants near TIMP3 and high-density lipoprotein%u2013associated loci influence susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

MUHC leads pan-Canadian initiative on respiratory disease

Story Summary: Leading an initiative such as this one, which is based on a solid platform of research, information technology, modern infrastructure, and nationwide collaboration in biomedical sciences, is totally aligned with the strategic plan of the Research Institute of the MUHC. If this trend continues, it is feared that more than 6,000 women and 5,000 men nationwide will die from COPD complications in 2010. This research project is funded through the collaborative research program CIHR / Rx & D, in partnership with AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer and the Respiratory Health Network of the FRSQ. CanCOLD aims to address challenging and important research questions in a more concerted and high-impact fashion by: Working together to promote the sharing of common objectives and expertise in COPD research. Creating a new research platform for COPD in Canada to leverage future research projects (database, tissue bank, labs and exercise facilities). Assisting public-health and healthcare system decision makers in developing policies to improve the diagnosis and management of COPD….Read the Full Story

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Inovio Biomedical Awarded Grant From Pennsylvania Department Of Health For Hepatitis C Virus DNA Vaccine Research

Story Summary: These grants will support research on ways to improve the prevention and treatment of critical health problems facing Pennsylvanians, said Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Everette James. These grants are awarded as part of the Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement Program (CURE), which supports clinical, health services and biomedical research. More information on the use of tobacco settlement funds can be found here. SourceInovio Biomedical Corporation Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. Please send any medical news or health news press releases to: These are the most read articles from this news category for the last 6 months: Acetaminophen-Related Liver Damage May Be Prevented By Common Herbal Medicine18 Nov 2009A well-known Eastern medicine supplement may help avoid the most common cause of liver transplantation, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Follow Our News On Twitter:Get the latest news for this category delivered straight to your Twitter account. Improving Health CareImprovements are necessary to make sure Americans get the best quality health care and that money for this care is being spent as effectively as possible. When should you worry? Our panel discusses the causes and warning signs of alcoholism and how to recognize them….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Primary cilia formation provides insight into genetic diseases

Story Summary: The scientists, led by Joe Gleeson, MD, professor of neurosciences and pediatrics at UC San Diego and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and Joon Kim, a UC San Diego postdoctoral fellow, utilized a high-throughput, cell-based screen to evaluate the impact of more than 8,000 genes and their relation to cilia function and development. The scientists also identified protein groups that are key modulators between cilia and the endocytic recycling pathway. These findings suggest that there are specific protein targets for the development of ciliopathy therapy, according to Gleeson. When cytochalasin D, a small molecule which permeates cells and inhibits cytoskeleton polymerization, was applied to one of the identified proteins, it repaired cilium formation in cells carrying mutations. Additional contributors to the study include Ji Eun Lee of UC San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Neurosciences; Keiichiro Ono, KiYoung Lee, and Trey Ideker of UC San Diego School of Medicine and Bioengineering; Susanne Heynen, Eigo Suyama, and Pedro Aza-Blanc of Sanford-Burnham Institute for Medical Research….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith

Slobbery kisses from mans best friend aid cancer research

Story Summary: No dogs will be harmed and many should be helped. The research is endorsed by the American Kennel Club and by the Morris Animal Foundation. Samples will be gathered with the consent of owners and veterinarians. Were proud to be part of such an innovative approach that fully supports our mission of providing total lifetime care for pets, and one that will offer hope to people and dogs who are suffering from these illnesses, said Phil Francis, Executive Chairman of PetSmart. Through the federal grant, researchers also will draw on experts at the National Cancer Institutes Pediatric and Genetics Branches and Comparative Oncology program, including Dr. Paul Meltzer, Chief of NCIs Genetics Branch. Dr. Meltzer and his colleagues will use gene expression profiling to identify genes involved in osteosarcoma to determine if the same genetic markers, alterations, and targets found are also found in human osteosarcoma, and in dogs. Why study dogs?Dr. Jeffrey Trent, President and Research Director for TGen and VARI, said that it is difficult to study rare cancers in people, because there is insufficient data. But by studying similar types of cancers more prevalent in dogs, researchers should be better able to help those who currently have little hope. You may have a very difficult disease course, and you have very little information about how to guide the physician, and what treatment would be best. For example, children with osteosarcoma, a rare bone cancer, still often results in the loss of limbs. Were excited about the idea that we may be able to identify areas that could be mutually beneficial that could help the canine patient and can help the human patient with these various cancers, Dr. Trent said. Study will investigate many diseasesThe study is focused on sarcomas, those cancers that originate in the connective tissues such as bone, cartilage and fat. They are highly malignant and can be found most anywhere in the body. VARI is analyzing the DNA and RNA of Clumber Spaniels, looking for genetic patterns that eventually could indicate if a particular dog is a carrier of a defective gene that could cause cancer. Weve got an incredible advantage here with the dogs, because these diseases are much more common in dogs than they are in humans. Our strongest hope and desire is that we can translate that into therapies we can use for people, Dr. Duesbery said. About Van Andel Research InstituteEstablished by Jay and Betty Van Andel in 1996, Van Andel Institute (VAI) is an independent research and educational organization based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, dedicated to preserving, enhancing and expanding the frontiers of medical science, and to achieving excellence in education by probing fundamental issues of education and the learning process. This is accomplished through the work of over 200 researchers in 18 on-site laboratories and in collaborative partnerships that span the globe. About TGenThe Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is on the cutting edge of translational research where investigators are able to unravel the genetic components of common and complex diseases. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities, TGen believes it can make a substantial contribution to the efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. TGen is affiliated with the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan. TGen is affiliated with the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan….Read the Full Story

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Recommendation and review posted by Bethany Smith


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