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Archive for the ‘Personalized Medicine’ Category

Whole Genome Sequencing and You – Video


Whole Genome Sequencing and You
This video is about whole genome sequencing. What is a genome? What are the basics of how whole genome sequencing works? What can you find out about yourself from getting your genome sequenced? And what are the potential benefits and risks? You might be considering getting your genome sequenced for clinical, research or personal reasons. Or you might just be curious and want to learn a bit more about this technology. This video was developed to help you understand a bit more about what whole genome sequencing is, and what it could mean for you. It was developed by researchers at Mount Sinai's Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences and Department of Emergency Medicine with funding from the Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, with valuable input from several community consultants, patients and others from around the Mount Sinai community. bull; Visit the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences: ow.ly bull; Visit the Department of Emergency Medicine: ow.ly bull; Visit the Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine: ow.lyFrom:MountSinaiSchoolViews:171 4ratingsTime:10:41More inEducation

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Whole Genome Sequencing and You – Video

Computational Challenges and Opportunities in Personalized Medicine – Video


Computational Challenges and Opportunities in Personalized Medicine
Rapid progress in systems biology and molecular analytical platforms offers the promise of major gains in the detection, treatment and prevention of diseases and for targeting therapeutic interventions to match the molecular and pharmacogenetic profiles of individual patients (personalized medicine). Whole genome sequencing and other molecular diagnostics, next-generation body imaging and miniaturized on-body:in-body sensors will assume increasing importance in the healthcare value chain as powerful platforms for precision diagnosis, selection of optimum treatment, treatment compliance and remote monitoring of individual health status.From:INFORMSonlineViews:4 0ratingsTime:52:39More inScience Technology

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Computational Challenges and Opportunities in Personalized Medicine – Video

CBI Project Final – Video


CBI Project Final
Executive summary of Cascade Biotherapeutic, Inc (CBI) product and service offerings to the consumers of healthcare information applyting personalized medicine to managing their health and wellbeing, and government agencies procuring supply chain management solutions for medical countermeasures.From:jcbioteckViews:2 0ratingsTime:03:24More inScience Technology

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CBI Project Final – Video

GNS Healthcare, Dana-Farber and Mount Sinai Collaborate to Build Computer Model of Multiple Myeloma

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., BOSTON and NEW YORK, Nov. 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ –GNS Healthcare, Inc. (GNS), the leading healthcare data analytics company focused on enabling personalized medicine to improve human health, today announced that it has entered into a collaboration with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Dana-Farber) and Mount Sinai School of Medicine (Mount Sinai) to create a data-driven computer model of multiple myeloma, the second most common blood cancer in the U.S. that constitutes approximately one percent of all cancers. Created using GNS’s supercomputer-driven REFS (Reverse Engineering and Forward Simulation) platform, the models will be used to help researchers discover novel therapies for the disease and to help determine the best existing treatments for patients.

“We have made encouraging progress at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in using gene profiling, proteomic and signaling studies in tumor cell samples treated with existing and novel medicines to get a better understanding of myeloma pathogenesis and to develop novel targeted therapies,” said Dr. Ken Anderson, Director, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center and LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics at Dana-Farber and Kraft Family Professor of Medicine at Dana-Farber and Harvard Medical School.

“Because of this progress, our team is excited about deploying a powerful, supercomputer driven approach using our multi-layered genomic data to develop computer models to directly define the integrated underlying circuitry of myeloma. We look forward to using these models to identify, create, and implement better treatments for individual multiple myeloma patients,” said Dr. Nikhil Munshi, Associate Director, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center and LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics at Dana-Farber and Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

“GNS will apply its Big Data analytics platform to create a disease-specific computer model that will yield a powerful new resource to the multiple myeloma research and clinical communitywith the ultimate aim of better outcomes for patients,” said GNS CEO and co-founder Colin Hill. “This collaboration with Dana-Farber and Mount Sinai will create models that will help transform the tremendous amount of data coming from new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, into predictive computer models of disease progression and treatment response for scientists and clinicians. This project is one of many examples of our work in challenging, complex and, sometimes rare, diseases.”

In this collaboration, GNS will employ the REFSplatform to reverse engineer network models from next-generation genetic sequencing, proteomic, outcomes and other clinical data. Results from millions ofin silico simulations of the REFS models will provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms of multiple myeloma, enabling the identification of novel intervention points in the disease for specific groups of patients and the development of more effective medicines.

“Prior published work has shown us that approaches like the REFS platform can develop integrated network models of disease that can be used to uncover novel drivers of disease,” said Dr. Eric Schadt, Director of the Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, Chair of the Department of Genetics and Genomics Sciences and the Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Genomics at Mount Sinai. “With the wealth of detailed biological data available in this project, we look forward to a close collaboration with GNS to build a predictive model to elucidate novel insights into this complex disease.”

About Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell normally responsible for producing antibodies. In multiple myeloma, collections of abnormal plasma cells accumulate in the bone marrow, where they interfere with the production of normal blood cells. Most cases of myeloma also feature the production of a paraproteinan abnormal antibody which can cause kidney problems. Bone lesions and hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) are also often encountered. Myeloma is diagnosed with blood tests (serum protein electrophoresis, serum free kappa/lambda light chain assay), bone marrow examination, urine protein electrophoresis and X-rays of commonly involved bones. Myeloma is generally thought to be treatable but incurable. Remissions may be induced with steroids, chemotherapy, proteasome inhibitors (e.g. bortezomib), immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) such as thalidomide or lenalidomide and stem cell transplants. Radiation therapy is sometimes used to reduce pain from bone lesions. Myeloma develops in 1-4 per 100,000 people per year. It is more common in men, and for unknown reasons is twice as common in African-Americans as it is in white Americans. With conventional treatment, median survival is 3-4 years, which may be extended to 5-7 years or longer with advanced treatments. Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematological malignancy in the U.S. (after non-Hodgkin lymphoma) and constitutes 1 percent of all cancers.

About REFS

REFS (Reverse Engineering and Forward Simulation) is GNS Healthcare’s scalable, supercomputer-enabled framework for discovering new knowledge directly from data. REFS automates the discovery and extraction of causal network models from observational data and uses high-throughput simulations to generate new knowledge.

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GNS Healthcare, Dana-Farber and Mount Sinai Collaborate to Build Computer Model of Multiple Myeloma

Ignyta Announces Scientific Presentations at American College of Rheumatology 2012 Annual Meeting

Ignyta, Inc., the personalized medicine company dedicated to improving the diagnosis and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and other autoimmune diseases, will present two of its scientific research studies during the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Annual Meeting, Nov. 10 to 14, in Washington DC. Both presentations reflect Ignytas scientific emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms of autoimmune diseases.

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) November 09, 2012

An oral presentation entitled The DNA Methylation Signature in Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes (FLS) Defines Critical Pathogenic Pathways in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), will be delivered on Monday, Nov.12 at 2:30 p.m. by Gary Firestein, M.D., Director of the Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Dean and Associate Vice Chancellor of Translational Medicine at UCSD, and Ignyta co-founder. Ignyta scientists are listed as co-authors on the presentation.

Ignytas Chief Scientific Officer, David Anderson, Ph.D., will present a poster entitled “The DNA Methylome of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) From Whole Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs),” during the session on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus – Human Etiology and Pathogenesis, on Tuesday, Nov. 13 from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

The selection by ACR of two Ignyta presentations reflects the importance of the work that Ignyta is contributing to the rheumatology field, said Jonathan Lim, M.D., CEO of Ignyta, Inc. Ignyta continues to make rapid progress in advancing novel biomarkers and molecular diagnostics for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

The Ignyta poster will be available for download on Monday, Nov. 12 at http://ignyta.com/nexdx_scientific_presentations.php.

Both presentations reflect Ignytas scientific emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. Within cells, the DNA signatures caused by methylation, a dominant epigenetic regulator, are potentially a novel and important source of biomarkers to better diagnose RA and other autoimmune diseases for the following reasons:

Epigenetic mechanisms recently have been shown to have a significant impact on several human diseases, including RA and systemic lupus erythematosus. Because aberrant DNA methylation might play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA, DNA methylation signatures could be developed as a valuable diagnostic tool.

These signatures are a more chemically and biologically stable source of molecular diagnostic information than RNA and many proteins, and reflect past environmental conditions leading to persistent changes in how cells transcribe their genome, leading to the expression of genes and their protein products.

The prevalence of DNA methylation biomarkers is higher than most genetic markers of disease and can be associated with multiple sites within a cell, potentially affecting several genes or other regulatory molecules. These biomarkers can be detected with very high sensitivity and specificity in blood-based tests, serving as tools for diagnosing diseases, as well as assessing patients’ prognoses and personalized responses to therapy.

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Ignyta Announces Scientific Presentations at American College of Rheumatology 2012 Annual Meeting

Genomind to Exhibit at Two Upcoming Mental Health Conferences

CHALFONT, Pa., Nov. 8, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Genomind, a personalized medicine company for neuropsychiatry, is excited to announce that company representatives will be attending and exhibiting at the American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference and the U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress, two respected conventions of mental health professionals that will occur this week.

Genomind will be on hand to share the most recent research and advancements in the field of personalized medicine, including their groundbreaking GeneceptTM Assay, a saliva-based test that quickly identifies biomarkers and genes that may influence or assist a clinician in developing a treatment plan for patients with depression and other neurological disorders. Genomind staff will share information with attendees on how such tests can be implemented into their practices, as well as how use of the test can often lead to better patient outcomes.

The American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference runs from November 7-10, 2012, at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh. The U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress will take place November 8-11, 2012, at the San Diego Convention Center.

About the Genecept Assay

The Genecept Assay is a comprehensive, simple-to-use tool for understanding genetic and biological markers that best inform response to different psychiatric treatments. The Assay is Genomind’s core product, and contains a proprietary panel of biomarker tests, an analytic report, and a psychopharmacologist consultation. The Assay can be used for a range of psychiatric conditions including depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, OCD and ADHD. For more information on the Assay, including information about the specific genes in the panel, please visit http://www.genomind.com/products/assay.

About Genomind

Genomind is a personalized medicine company, comprised of innovative researchers and expert leaders in psychiatry and neurology. Genomind is committed to discovery of the underlying causes of neuropsychiatric disorders and supports the development of personalized medicine that improves patients’ lives. Genomind was founded by Ronald I. Dozoretz, MD, a psychiatrist who has devoted his career to improving mental health. Jay Lombard, DO, a neurologist and co-founder of Genomind, is a critically acclaimed author and nationally recognized thought leader in neuropsychiatry practice and research. Learn more at http://www.genomind.com.

For more information, contact:

Doreen Korba Director of Marketing 215.396.5596 Doreen.Korba@genomind.com

This information was brought to you by Cision http://www.cisionwire.com http://www.cisionwire.com/genomind/r/genomind-to-exhibit-at-two-upcoming-mental-health-conferences,c9331955

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Genomind to Exhibit at Two Upcoming Mental Health Conferences

Research and Markets: Personalized Medicine Partnering Terms and Agreements

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/jm477c/personalized) has announced the addition of the “Personalized Medicine Partnering Terms and Agreements” report to their offering.

Comprehensive understanding and unprecedented access to the personalized medicine partnering deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading healthcare companies.

The Personalized Medicine Partnering Terms and Agreements report provides comprehensive understanding and unprecedented access to the personalized medicine partnering deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading healthcare companies.

The report provides a detailed understanding and analysis of how and why companies enter personalized medicine partnering deals. The majority of deals are discovery or development stage whereby the licensee obtains a right or an option right to license the licensors personalized medicine technology. These deals tend to be multicomponent, starting with collaborative R&D, and commercialization of outcomes.

Understanding the flexibility of a prospective partner’s negotiated deals terms provides critical insight into the negotiation process in terms of what you can expect to achieve during the negotiation of terms. Whilst many smaller companies will be seeking details of the payments clauses, the devil is in the detail in terms of how payments are triggered – contract documents provide this insight where press releases do not.

This report contains over 1500 links to online copies of actual personalized medicine deals and contract documents as submitted to the Securities Exchange Commission by companies and their partners. Contract documents provide the answers to numerous questions about a prospective partner’s flexibility on a wide range of important issues, many of which will have a significant impact on each party’s ability to derive value from the deal.

Report scope

Personalized Medicine Partnering Terms and Agreements is intended to provide the reader with an in-depth understanding and access to personalized medicine trends and structure of deals entered into by leading companies worldwide.

Personalized Medicine Partnering Terms and Agreements includes:

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Research and Markets: Personalized Medicine Partnering Terms and Agreements

Biomarkers For Psychiatric Disorders – Video


Biomarkers For Psychiatric Disorders
ll4.me Biomarkers For Psychiatric Disorders Blood and Brain Gene Expression in Major Psychiatric Disorders: A Search for Biomarkers.- Biomarkers in Schizophrenia.- Proteomic strategies for biomarker discovery from differential expression to isoforms to pathways.- Schizophrenia Biomarkers: a means to advance the disease understanding, diagnosis and treatment.- RNA Biomarkers in Schizophrenia.- Metabolomics: a global biochemical approach to the discovery of biomarkers for psychiatric disorders.- Animal models for schizophrenia a brief overview.- Synaptoproteomics of existing and new animal models of depression.- Animal Models for Anxiety Disorders.- Animal Models of affective behaviors and drug addiction.- Neuroimaging biomarkers in schizophrenia.- Sleep EEG provides biomarkers in depression.- Strategies to identify biomarkers for depression.- Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant response.- Perspectives for an integrated biomarker approach to drug discovery and development.- Hunting for peripheral biomarkers to support drug development in psychiatry.- Biomarkers for the development of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs.- DNA biomarkers for pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine.- Biological modeling in the discovery and validation of cognitive dysfunctions biomarkers. EAN/ISBN : 9780387792514 Publisher(s): Springer, Berlin, Springer US Discussed keywords: Neurologie Format: ePub/PDF Author(s): Turck, Chris W. Blood and Brain Gene Expression in Major Psychiatric Disorders …From:judybruno986Views:0 0ratingsTime:00:13More inPeople Blogs

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Biomarkers For Psychiatric Disorders – Video

The Science And Business Of Drug Discovery – Video


The Science And Business Of Drug Discovery
ll4.me The Science And Business Of Drug Discovery Introduction.- Introduction to Drugs and Drug Targets.- Background to Chemistry of Small and Large Molecules.- Laying the Foundations: Drug Discovery from Antiquity to the Twenty-First Century.- Drug Discovery Pipeline Overview.- Target Discovery.- Medicinal Chemistry.- Biotherapeutics.- Screening for Hits.- Process Chemistry and Formulation.- Preclinical Development.- Clinical Trials.- Regulatory Affairs and Marketing Approval.- Diagnostics and Personalized Medicine.- Putting it All Together: A Drug Development Case History.- Commercial Aspects of Drug Development.- Challenges and Responses.- Technology Transfer Executives.- Recruitment Executives.- Pharmaceutical Translators and Interpreters. EAN/ISBN : 9781441999023 Publisher(s): Springer, Berlin, Springer Science Business Media Format: ePub/PDF Author(s): Zanders, Edward D. Introduction.- Introduction to Drugs and Drug Targets.- Background to Chemistry of Small and Large Molecules.- Laying the Foundations: Drug Discovery from Antiquity to the Twenty-First Century.- DrugFrom:heathernewlon634Views:0 0ratingsTime:00:16More inPeople Blogs

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The Science And Business Of Drug Discovery – Video

Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequencing – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 1 – Video


Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequencing – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 1
Personalized Medicine via Genomic SequencingFrom:Viral PatelViews:14 0ratingsTime:04:00More inScience Technology

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Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequencing – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 1 – Video

Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequening – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 2 – Video


Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequening – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 2
Personalized Medicine via Genomic SequeningFrom:Viral PatelViews:7 0ratingsTime:03:57More inScience Technology

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Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequening – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 2 – Video

Dr. Marie Davidian at Elon University's Voices of Discovery – Video


Dr. Marie Davidian at Elon University's Voices of Discovery
Dr. Marie Davidian, professor of statistics at NC State University, explains how statistical analysis of data can determine what personalized treatment option is best for a patient. Davidian spoke about personalized medicine at Elon University's Voices of Discovery lecture on Nov. 5, 2012.From:Kyra GemberlingViews:1 0ratingsTime:00:38More inEducation

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Dr. Marie Davidian at Elon University’s Voices of Discovery – Video

Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequencing – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 3 – Video


Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequencing – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 3
Personalized Medicine via Genomic SequencingFrom:Viral PatelViews:0 0ratingsTime:03:41More inScience Technology

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Personalized Medicine via Genomic Sequencing – Dr. Hajduk Interview Part 3 – Video

Eight European researchers develop Ion AmpliSeq Community Panel for lung and colon cancer – Video


Eight European researchers develop Ion AmpliSeq Community Panel for lung and colon cancer
Life Technologies Ion AmpliSeq trade; Community Panels are a community-driven solution to gene panel sequencing that leverages the expertise of scientific thought leaders and the Ion Community to create gene panels for conditions ranging from cancer to inherited disease. One of the first panels was developed by eight leading European researchers who worked together with Life Technologies scientists to develop a 22-gene Ion AmpliSeq trade; Community Panel for lung and colon cancer. The panel analyzes more than 500 mutations in a single-tube assay that requires just 10 ng of DNA input per primer pool, about 25-fold less than alternative gene panel approaches. The Ion AmpliSeq trade; workflow is a simple PCR reaction that takes just 3.5 hours turn-around time. “Using classical methods to screen for mutations one at a time requires so much DNA sample, you often can't look at all the mutations you want,” said Dr. Pierre Laurent-Puig, MD, Ph.D., Professor at the Paris – Descartes University Medical School and a member of the OncoNetwork Consortium. “We have developed a tool that allows us to characterize tumors very easily, using only 10 ng of sample to screen more than 500 COSMIC mutations. Having these kits in our hands will accelerate throughput of the characterization of tumors and make personalized medicine a reality.” The research institutions that developed the panel — dubbed the OncoNetwork — include Centro Ricerche Oncologiche Mercogliano, Italy; Leiter Genetik / Molekularbiologie …From:iontorrentViews:9 0ratingsTime:05:38More inScience Technology

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Eight European researchers develop Ion AmpliSeq Community Panel for lung and colon cancer – Video

Personalized Medicine Potential of Cyclacel's Innovative and Diverse Oncology Pipeline Highlighted at NCRI Cancer …

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, N.J., Nov. 6, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (CYCC) (CYCCP) (Cyclacel or the Company), announced today multiple posters presented on the Company’s sapacitabine and on its Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitors during the 8th National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference being held November 4-7, 2012, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Sapacitabine:

“Sapacitabine efficacy is enhanced in homologous recombination defective tumours” Date/Time: Tuesday November 6, 2012, 8:30 — 17:30 Greenwich Mean Time Poster Number: B21

Cyclacel researchers reported that in vitro studies of sapacitabine’s active metabolite CNDAC showed that sapacitabine may be effective in patients with mutations of the breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1/2 or homologous recombination repair (HRR)-deficient tumors, such as subsets of triple negative breast, ovarian, colon and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, CNDAC synergized with either PARP inhibitors or cisplatin in both NSCLC and ovarian cancer cell lines. Cyclacel’s cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor seliciclib reduces expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 and can potentiate sapacitabine/CNDAC activity, as well as other agents enhanced in double strand break (DSB) repair-defective backgrounds. Sapacitabine treatment in combination with seliciclib is currently under investigation in a Phase 1 trial in patients with solid tumors at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, MA).

“Therapeutic potential of sapacitabine in cancers defective in homologous recombination” Date/Time: Tuesday November 6, 2012, 8:30 — 17:30 Greenwich Mean Time Poster Number: B207

Cyclacel collaborators from the Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, UK reported confirmation that ovarian and breast cancer cell lines defective in HRR are highly sensitive to CNDAC, supporting a possible role for sapacitabine/CNDAC in HRR-defective diseases. Primary ovarian cancer samples were also highly sensitive to CNDAC, and correlation of HRR status with CNDAC sensitivity is being assessed.

The studies further support the potential for sapacitabine to be used alone or in combinations to treat HRR- defective tumors, such as ATM- or BRCA-defective tumors. An investigator-sponsored Phase 2 study of sapacitabine in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) with deletion 11q22-23 is ongoing at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX). A Phase 1, study of sapacitabine in combination with seliciclib in patients with advanced solid tumors, is ongoing at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, MA). As reported at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2012 annual meeting among 19 patients in this study treated at the recommended Phase 2 doses, 3 with advanced breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancer achieved partial responses (PRs) and 1 with ovarian cancer showed stable disease. All 4 responding patients were reported by the investigator to be BRCA defective.

Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitors:

“Parameters improving the therapeutic window of Compound 4, a potent and selective Polo-like kinase 1 inhibitor: in vitro studies” Date/Time: Tuesday November 6, 2012, 8:30 — 17:30 Greenwich Mean Time Poster Number: B15

Cyclacel scientists and academic collaborators reported the biological characterization of Compound 4, a potent and selective, preclinical-stage, Plk1 inhibitor, selected for further development from Cyclacel’s novel Plk1 inhibitor series. In a panel of esophageal cancer cell lines, sensitivity to Compound 4 correlated with p53 status. Esophageal cell lines lacking functional p53 showed the greatest sensitivity to Compound 4. Short drug exposure times demonstrated differential sensitivity between cancerous esophageal cells versus control, outlining the potential broad therapeutic index for Compound 4 in treating esophageal cancers, and in particular those with non-functional p53. Status of p53 could be used as a predictive biomarker in clinical trials to identify responders.

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Personalized Medicine Potential of Cyclacel's Innovative and Diverse Oncology Pipeline Highlighted at NCRI Cancer …

Personalizing medicine: New American Chemical Society Prized Science video

Public release date: 6-Nov-2012 [ | E-mail | Share ]

Contact: Michael Bernstein m_bernstein@acs.org 202-872-6042 American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, Nov. 6, 2012 Personalized medicine the promise of customizing treatments that will work best for each individual patient could get a boost from advances in understanding how the proteins that help determine health and disease take the three-dimensional shapes needed to work in the body. That’s the message of the latest episode of the 2012 edition of a popular video series from the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The videos are available at http://www.acs.org/PrizedScience and on DVD.

Titled Prized Science: How the Science Behind American Chemical Society Awards Impacts Your Life, the final episode of the 2012 series features the research of Peter Wolynes, Ph.D., winner of the 2012 ACS Award in Theoretical Chemistry. The award is sponsored by Dell Incorporated. Wolynes is a professor at Rice University.

The award recognizes Wolynes’ research on proteins, those workhorses of human cells that carry out the instructions from the genetic material DNA. His research aims to help scientists understand how proteins fold into the correct architecture to keep the body healthy and functioning properly. When proteins do not take the right shape, illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease, can develop. Even slight changes in a protein can have major effects on health, and understanding how this happens could help in the development of personalized medicine.

The premiere episode of Prized Science features Robert Langer, Sc.D., winner of the 2012 ACS Priestley Medal. The video explains Langer’s pioneering work making body tissues in the lab by growing cells on special pieces of plastic. Langer’s team has used the approach to make skin for burn patients, for instance, with the goal of eventually making whole organs for transplantation.

Other episodes feature Chad Mirkin, Ph.D., winner of the 2012 ACS Award for Creative Invention; Vicki Grassian, Ph.D., winner of the 2012 ACS Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology; and Diane Bunce, Ph.D., winner of the 2012 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education.

ACS encourages educators, schools, museums, science centers, news organizations and others to embed links to Prized Science on their websites. The videos discuss scientific research in non-technical language for general audiences. New episodes in the series, which focuses on ACS’ 2012 national award recipients, will be issued periodically.

The 2012 edition of Prized Science is completely refreshed, with a new look and feel, with renowned scientists telling the story of their own research and its impact and potential impact on everyday life. Colorful graphics and images visually explain the award recipient’s research.

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Personalizing medicine: New American Chemical Society Prized Science video

Personalized Medicine Tshishiku Chiang Pickerell Ratajczak Pathipati – Video


Personalized Medicine Tshishiku Chiang Pickerell Ratajczak Pathipati
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Personalized Medicine Tshishiku Chiang Pickerell Ratajczak Pathipati – Video

Machine Learning for Industry with Microsoft Research Lead Scientist – Video


Machine Learning for Industry with Microsoft Research Lead Scientist
Machine learning is a powerful industry tool with applications from ad prediction to personalized medicine. John Langford is a machine learning research scientist at Microsoft Research New York, the principal developer of Vowpal Wabbit, and the program co-chair for the 2012 International Conference on Machine Learning. To see more videos from the 2012 Siebel Scholars Conference including discussions on class warfare and inequality David Brooks, New York Times; William Galston, Brookings Institute; Niall Ferguson, Harvard University and Hoover Institution; Lewis Lapham, Lapham's Quarterly; Charles Murray, American Enterprise Institute; Ralph Nader; Robert Reich, former Secretary of Labor; Condoleezza Rice, former Secretary of State; and Thomas M. Siebel, chairman, Siebel Scholars Foundation, visit http://www.youtube.com Learn more about Siebel Scholars at http://www.siebelscholars.comFrom:SiebelScholarsViews:1 0ratingsTime:21:32More inPeople Blogs

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Machine Learning for Industry with Microsoft Research Lead Scientist – Video

Knowledge-based Bioinformatics: From Analysis To Interpretation – Video


Knowledge-based Bioinformatics: From Analysis To Interpretation
ll4.me Knowledge-based Bioinformatics: From Analysis To Interpretation There is an increasing need throughout the biomedical sciences for a greater understanding of knowledge-based systems and their application to genomic and proteomic research. This book discusses knowledge-based and statistical approaches, along with applications in bioinformatics and systems biology. The text emphasizes the integration of different methods for analysing and interpreting biomedical data. This, in turn, can lead to breakthrough biomolecular discoveries, with applications in personalized medicine.Key Features:Explores the fundamentals and applications of knowledge-based and statistical approaches in bioinformatics and systems biology.Helps readers to interpret genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data in understanding complex biological molecules and their interactions.Provides useful guidance on dealing with large datasets in knowledge bases, a common issue in bioinformatics.Written by leading international experts in this field.Students, researchers, and industry professionals with a background in biomedical sciences, mathematics, statistics, or computer science will benefit from this book. It will also be useful for readers worldwide who want to master the application of bioinformatics to real-world situations and understand biological problems that motivate algorithms. Publisher: Wiley Illustration: N Language: ENG Title: Knowledge-Based Bioinformatics: From analysis to interpretation …From:ashleybrown9858Views:0 0ratingsTime:00:13More inPeople Blogs

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Knowledge-based Bioinformatics: From Analysis To Interpretation – Video

Prized Science – Peter Wolynes: Untangling Protein Folding – Video


Prized Science – Peter Wolynes: Untangling Protein Folding
Peter Wolynes, winner of the 2012 ACS Award in Theoretical Chemistry, spent his career untangling the process of protein folding and discovered a process through which these chain molecules tumble into shape. His discovery may help usher in new techniques for personalized medicine and reveal how protein mutations affect the body.From:BytesizeScienceViews:4 3ratingsTime:06:03More inScience Technology

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Prized Science – Peter Wolynes: Untangling Protein Folding – Video

23. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology: Part IIb Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine NQ – Video


23. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology: Part IIb Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine NQ
Encoded in the DNA sequence of our individual genome is the genetic program to build, maintain, and adapt all our tissues and their functions. Each human genome contains 200000 coding elements (exons) and millions of regulatory elements defining complex signaling and regulatory networks. Pharmacogenomics is the study of how an individual's genetic inheritance affects the body's response to drugs. Personalized Medicine offers treatments and diagnostics for the future based on a patients' DNA sequence. Sequencing and analysis of the human genome's six billion base pairs is now rapid and affordable. studies on drug metabolism can now be based on individual genomicsFrom:Albert KauschViews:0 0ratingsTime:01:11:11More inScience Technology

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23. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology: Part IIb Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine NQ – Video

AdvaMedDx: The Role of Advanced Diagnostics in Cancer Care – Cesar Garcia, President


AdvaMedDx: The Role of Advanced Diagnostics in Cancer Care – Cesar Garcia, President CEO, IRIS
Speaker: Cesar Garcia, President CEO, IRIS On September 20th, 2012, AdvaMedDx invited diagnostic manufacturers, the cancer research community, and a patient advocate to Capitol Hill briefing in Washington, DC to educate attendees on recent advances in cancer diagnostics that are improving the treatment and management of patients with cancer. Held in conjunction with the House Medical Technology Caucus, this briefing will explore how advanced diagnostics are delivering on the promise of personalized medicine. Leading medical technology manufacturers are developing new, state-of-the-art diagnostic tests to help physicians and patients make the most informed treatment decisions possible. These tests provide critical information that allow health care providers to detect and diagnose disease earlier, target treatments to the individual patient, utilize more preventative and less invasive treatment options, and manage diseases such as cancer more effectively. Innovation in molecular diagnostic tests hold great promise for identifying small genetic differences that can often impact diagnosis, prognosis, drug selection, and outcomes for cancer patients. Molecular diagnostic tests can be used to identify a particular existing disease or condition, identify a patient's likelihood of recurrence, and identify genetic variability to allow for more accurate and targeted treatment selection tailored to individual needs. These advances in diagnostics are helping to improve patient …From:AdvaMedDxViews:4 1ratingsTime:21:12More inNonprofits Activism

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AdvaMedDx: The Role of Advanced Diagnostics in Cancer Care – Cesar Garcia, President

1000 Genomes Project moves researchers closer to personalized medicine

In a major step toward an era of personalized medicine, researchers reported Wednesday that they have sequenced the complete DNA material of more than 1,000 people from 14 population groups in Europe, Africa, East Asia and the Americas.

The report from the $120 million 1000 Genomes Project involved 700 scientists from laboratories in the U.S., Canada, China, Japan, Nigeria and Kenya, among others. Their results, published in Nature, offer the closest look yet at the differences in humankind’s biological instruction set, documenting how myriad rare mutations may underpin many diseases and set the people of one locale apart from another in ways that shape their health.

All told, the scientists identified 38 million variations in the chemical letters of DNA that make up each of the average person’s 23,000 or so genes and the DNA regions that control themabout 98 percent of all the estimated human variation in the world.

“We are getting to the point where an individual genome sequence can be a useful part of diagnosis,” said statistical geneticist Gilean McVean at Oxford University in England, who led the effort. “If there is a variation that is present in just one in 100 people, we have found it,”

The immense compendium of genetic codea catalog of human variation equal to 16 million file cabinets of data, or 30,000 DVDsis meant to serve as a standard reference against which doctors could one day compare a patient’s genome profile, even during a routine checkup.

Far from complete, the data already are straining the computer capacity of most laboratories to store and analyze. Moreover, the researchers expect to add genetic data from 1,500 more people within a few months. Earlier this year, Amazon.com Inc. volunteered to store the vast database in its cloud services, from which it could be freely accessed by anyone.

Generally, all humans share about 99 percent of the DNA code that shapes development, health, personality and other traits. But the common genetic variations that most people share account for only a fraction of the risk of inherited disease.

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1000 Genomes Project moves researchers closer to personalized medicine

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