Archive for the ‘Knee Osteoarthritis’ Category

Osteoarthritis of the Knee – WebMD

While age is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis of the knee, young people can get it, too. For some individuals, it may be hereditary. For others, osteoarthritis of the knee can result from injury or infection or even from being overweight. Here are answers to your questions about knee osteoarthritis, including how it’s treated and what you can do at home to ease the pain.

Osteoarthritis, commonly known as wear-and-tear arthritis, is a condition in which the natural cushioning between joints — cartilage — wears away. When this happens, the bones of the joints rub more closely against one another with less of the shock-absorbing benefits of cartilage. The rubbing results in pain, swelling, stiffness, decreased ability to move and, sometimes, the formation of bone spurs.

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. While it can occur even in young people, the chance of developing osteoarthritis rises after age 45. According to the Arthritis Foundation, more than 27 million people in the U.S. have osteoarthritis, with the knee being one of the most commonly affected areas. Women are more likely to have osteoarthritis than men.

The most common cause of osteoarthritis of the knee is age. Almost everyone will eventually develop some degree of osteoarthritis. However, several factors increase the risk of developing significant arthritis at an earlier age.

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Osteoarthritis of the Knee – WebMD

Knee osteoarthritis treatment – AposTherapy

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and describes the degeneration of the joints. The body is constantly repairing the daily wear and tear on our joints; however, osteoarthritis develops when the body cant maintain this repair process. Knee osteoarthritis is the most common form of osteoarthritis affecting 50% of people aged 65 and above. Whilst most experience relatively mild symptoms, for one in ten people, their knee pain and joint stiffness are debilitating.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and disability, worldwide. Cartilage breakdown partly explains the degenerative nature of knee osteoarthritis, but a major part of the process is due to muscular weakness and loss of control. An effective therapy must then reduce stress on the knee and prevent muscular imbalances that occur as the joint bends and rotates. AposTherapy redistributes the forces acting on the affected area by re-aligning the body and restoring neuromuscular control. Patients report a significant reduction in pain and improvement in their joint function and quality of life.

OA is the most common type of arthritis and describes the degeneration of the joints. The body is constantly repairing the daily wear and tear on our joints; however, it develops when the body cant maintain this repair process. OA in the knee is the most common form of osteoarthritis affecting 50% of people aged 65 and above. Whilst most experience relatively mild symptoms, for one in ten people, their knee pain and joint stiffness are debilitating.

Over the last two decades research has shown that the muscles that stabilise and move the joint play a key role in the development and the deterioration of knee OA. Weakness and loss of neuromuscular control of the quadriceps, as well as other muscles around the knee and the hip, is thought to be a precursor to the degenerative process. The first apparent change is usually cartilage damage, which increases over time, eventually causing the underlying bony surface to become exposed with growth on the edges of the joint, visible by X-ray.

Symptoms are often worse on waking up in the morning, after over-activity, as well as sitting or standing for a prolonged period of time. As the tissues around the joints become inflamed and painful, the simplest of actions like climbing stairs or bending to tie a shoe-lace can suddenly seem very difficult, which naturally has a detrimental effect on a persons quality of life. Symptoms can also worsen when a degenerative tear in the meniscus or bone necrosis occur, as part of the natural history of this pathology.

Various elements can predispose people to developing the condition and increase the rate of degeneration. These include obesity, genetics, gender (women being more likely to develop OA than men), the onset of old age, overuse of the joint in physically demanding occupations, or in professional athletes and previous joint trauma.

Adiagnosis can be made using various methods including clinical criteria and radiographic findings (X-rays and scans). The American College of Rheumatology recommends a combination of history, physical examination and laboratory tests to help with an osteoarthritis treatment.

The symptoms emerge as a result of a number of processes occurring in the knee. These processes include aggravation of joint surfaces, bone thickening and spurs, muscle bracing causing fatigue with increased joint compression, as well as inflammation of the joint capsule and the surrounding structures.

People with knee OA have been shown to have weaker and less responsive quadriceps muscle. In addition, overactive hamstrings and inner-thigh muscles cause muscular imbalances around the joint and contribute to the progression of the condition. This is because the muscles are increasing the load on the damaged part of the joint and disrupting the knees normal movement. Over time it becomes harder for patients to straighten the knee. The over-active muscles can also increase the bowlegged posture, typical of many patients with osteoarthritis. By and large, these muscular imbalances exacerbate the symptoms of OA as well as playing a role in further joint damage.

Experts agree that symptom relief can be achieved if muscular imbalances can be addressed, and the muscles are trained to work more efficiently. At the initial onset of OA, doctors often advise regular light exercise along with painkillers and/or anti-inflammatory drugs to manage symptoms. If inflammation of the joint is persistent an injection of cortico-steroid is sometimes given, as well as another type of injection containing hyaluronic acid, which is thought to encourage cartilage repair. However, these treatment options are often short-lived and do not address the root of the problem.

Once therapeutic exercise has been introduced and adjustments in lifestyle made, if the OA continues to limit normal functioning in daily life, then a surgical intervention is often considered. The surgical path is usually initiated with an arthroscopic (key-hole) operation to clear-out the joint space and trim any damaged cartilage. Ultimately, the last resort is to replace the symptomatic joint with an artificial joint, which is a procedure known as total knee replacement.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, UK advises physiotherapy and therapeutic exercises as the most effective and highly-proven treatment for reducing symptoms and slowing down the degenerative process. AposTherapy addresses the muscle bracing found around OA joints and works to maintain the range of movement and improve the coordination of those muscles that protect the knee from damage. AposTherapy also enhances how these muscles function during regular daily life, with the treatment goal being to provide the joints with optimal control and stability.

Based on the latest evidence regarding the central role biomechanics plays in osteoarthritis treatment, AposTherapy offers a novel approach for the treatment and management of the disease. AposTherapy readjusts the distribution of your body’s weight away from the damaged area of the knee joint, with the aim of reducing the compressive forces and therefore, the pain. By simulating minutely uneven walking surfaces and altering the nature of the foot’s point of contact with the ground, therapy retrains the body’s neuromuscular system, instilling optimal patterns of motion. AposTherapy is clinically proven to reduce pain, improve patients walking patterns and contribute to a better quality of life.

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Knee osteoarthritis treatment – AposTherapy

Knee Stem Cell Therapy – Surgery & Replacement Alternative

Regenexx Knee Stem Cell Therapy for Injuries and ArthritisChris Centeno2015-08-07T15:30:40+00:00

The Regenexx family ofnon-surgical stem cell and blood platelet procedures offer next-generation injection treatments for those who are suffering from knee pain or may be facing knee surgery or knee replacement due to common tendon, ligament and bone injuries, arthritis and other degenerative conditions.

As an alternative to knee surgery or knee replacement, Regenexx procedures may help alleviate knee pain and the conditions that cause it with a same-day office injection procedure. Unlike traditional surgery, Regenexx patients are typically encouraged to walk the same day, and most patients experience very little down time from the procedure.

Knee Patient Results | Regenexx SD Procedure Overview | ACL Injuries | Meniscus Tears

This is not a complete list of conditions treated, but the most common knee conditions we have treated throughout the years. If you are experiencing knee pain, injury, or arthritis, please contact us or complete the candidacy form below to learn more about whether the Regenexx Procedures are right for you.

This Regenexx-SD (same-day) bone marrow derived stem cell treatment outcome data analysis is part of the Regenexx data download of patients who were tracked in the Regenexx advanced patient registry.

This Regenexx-SD (same-day) bone marrow derived stem cell treatment outcome data analysis is part of the Regenexx data download of patients who were tracked in the Regenexx advanced patient registry following treatment for Meniscus Tears.

This data utilizes LEFS (Lower Extremity Functional Scale) data from our knee arthritis patients treated with stem cell injections. Functional questionnaires ask the patients questions such as how well they can walk, run, climb stairs, etc. The improvements following the Regenexx-SD procedure are highly statistically significant.

If you are considering a knee replacement, watch the video in the sidebar of this page and read about how stem cells stack up against knee replacements.

BioMed Research International;Volume 2014, Article ID 370621,.Centeno CJ.

Introduction. We investigated the use of autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC) with and without an adipose graft, fortreatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Treatment registry data for patients who underwent BMC procedures with andwithout an adipose graft were analyzed. Pre- and posttreatment outcomes of interest included the lower extremity functional scale(LEFS), the numerical pain scale (NPS), and a subjective percentage improvement rating. Multivariate analyses were performedto examine the effects of treatment type adjusting for potential confounding factors. The frequency and type of adverse events(AE) were also examined. Results. 840 procedures were performed, 616 without and 224 with adipose graft. The mean LEFS scoreincreased by 7.9 and 9.8 in the two groups (out of 80), respectively, and the mean NPS score decreased from 4 to 2.6 and from 4.3to 3 in the two groups, respectively. AE rates were 6% and 8.9% in the two groups, respectively. Although pre- and posttreatmentimprovements were statistically significant, the differences between the groups were not. Conclusion. BMC injections for knee OAshowed encouraging outcomes and a low rate of AEs. Addition of an adipose graft to the BMC did not provide a detectible benefitover BMC alone.

Two time Super Bowl Champ Jarvis Greens story. From a young boy struggling to get through a football practice, to a 2X Super Bowl Champion, Jarvis tells his story of pain and struggle following knee surgeries, and his return to form following a Regenexx Stem Cell Procedure.

If you are interested in learning whether you are a good candidate for the Regenexx Procedure, please complete the Regenexx Procedure Candidate Form below or call us at 888-525-3005.

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Knee Stem Cell Therapy – Surgery & Replacement Alternative

Symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis – RightDiagnosis.com

Symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis

The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Knee osteoarthritis includes the 16 symptoms listed below:

Research symptoms & diagnosis of Knee osteoarthritis:

Review the available symptom checkers for these symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis:

Review the available Assessment Questionnaires for the symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis:

Do I have Knee osteoarthritis?

Diseases that may be commonly undiagnosed in related medical areas:

Home medical tests related to Knee osteoarthritis:

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

More information about symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis and related conditions:

Click on any of the symptoms below to see a full list of other causes including diseases, medical conditions, toxins, drug interactions, or drug side effect causes of that symptom.

Onset of Knee osteoarthritis: Symptoms usually start after the age of 45 but can occur in younger people.

These general reference articles may be of interest in relation to medical signs and symptoms of disease in general:

Full list of premium articles on symptoms and diagnosis

The symptom information on this page attempts to provide a list of some possible signs and symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis. This signs and symptoms information for Knee osteoarthritis has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of Knee osteoarthritis signs or Knee osteoarthritis symptoms. Furthermore, signs and symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis may vary on an individual basis for each patient. Only your doctor can provide adequate diagnosis of any signs or symptoms and whether they are indeed Knee osteoarthritis symptoms.

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Symptoms of Knee osteoarthritis – RightDiagnosis.com

What is Knee Osteoarthritis? | Arthritis-Health

Gradual onset of knee pain, stiffness and swelling are typical symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. Arthritis of the knee comes in several forms. Osteoarthritis is by far the most common form, followed by some forms of inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout.

While there are many similarities in the symptoms and treatments of knee pain from various types of arthritis, this article focuses on osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis involves two primary processes:

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This degenerative process can lead to abnormal joint function, pain and stiffness. The osteoarthritic process is gradual, with symptoms that may come and go and eventually worsen over a number of years. One of the primary symptoms of persons with knee osteoarthritis is pain. This pain may follow a pattern, for example:

There are several risk factors that make one more likely to develop the condition. The primary risk factors are advanced age (over age 45), prior knee injury, and excess weight.

This article provides an in-depth review of the symptoms, causes and risk factors, diagnostic process, and surgical and nonsurgical treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee.

The knee is a flexible, weight-bearing joint especially prone to wear-and-tear and therefore likely to be affected by osteoarthritis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly half of Americans may experience the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis at some point during their lives, and it is a leading cause of disability in people over age 50.1

An arthritic knee has thinned, damaged or missing cartilage in the joint. The damaged cartilage is not in and of itself a source of pain or other symptoms. Instead, the damaged or missing cartilage causes friction between bones and other knee problems, which in turn cause knee pain and related symptoms.

Other than some sort of trauma or acute injury, the most common source of pain in the knee joint is arthritis, usually osteoarthritis. Inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout, are less common.

In an osteoarthritic knee, the articular cartilage is thinned, damaged or entirely worn away. When the knee cartilage has deteriorated in such a manner, the following process ensues:

It is important to note that cartilage does not contain nerves, so damaged cartilage is not the primary source of pain in knee osteoarthritis. Likewise, bone spurs are a normal sign of aging and the presence of bone spurs alone are not a cause for concern. However, the friction between bones and other resulting abnormalities in the knee can cause discomfort and pain.

Chronic knee discomfort and/or minor pain may warrant evaluation, since an appropriate treatment program can encourage healthy joint function and minimize or halt the progression of symptoms. As a general rule, if the osteoarthritis is diagnosed and treated early in the disease process, health care professionals believe that the outcome will be better for the patient in terms of less pain and fewer complications.

References:

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What is Knee Osteoarthritis? | Arthritis-Health

About Knee Osteoarthritis – Causes, Symptoms & Diagnosis …

Indication

Synvisc-One (hylan G-F 20) is indicated for the treatment of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conservative non-pharmacologic therapy and simple analgesics, e.g., acetaminophen.

Before trying Synvisc-One, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Allergic reactions, some which can be potentially severe, have been reported during the use of Synvisc-One. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, and should be used with caution when there is swelling of the legs due to problems with venous stasis or lymphatic drainage.

Synvisc-One is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Synvisc-One has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds such as feathers, eggs or poultry or if your leg is swollen or infected.

Synvisc-One has not been tested in children (21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child.

Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after Synvisc-One include (

View the Complete Prescribing Information for Synvisc-One

SYNVISC (hylan G-F 20) is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). It is for patients who do not get enough relief from simple painkillers such as acetaminophen, or from exercise and physical therapy.

Before trying SYNVISC, tell your doctor if you have had an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the face, tongue or throat, respiratory difficulty, rash, itching or hives to SYNVISC or any hyaluronan-based products. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Should not be used in patients with an infected knee joint, skin disease or infection around the area where the injection will be given, or circulatory problems in the legs.

SYNVISC is only for injection into the knee, performed by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. SYNVISC has not been tested to show pain relief in joints other than the knee. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to products from birds – such as feathers, eggs or poultry – or if your leg is swollen or infected.

SYNVISC has not been tested in children (21years old), pregnant women or women who are nursing. You should tell your doctor if you think you are pregnant or if you are nursing a child. Talk to your doctor before resuming strenuous weight-bearing activities after treatment.

The side effects sometimes seen after SYNVISC include pain, swelling, heat, redness, and/or fluid buildup in or around the knee. These reactions were generally mild and did not last long, but in rare occasions these side effects were more severe. The most commonly occurring adverse events outside of the injected knee were rash, fever, nausea, and headache.

View the Complete Prescribing Information for SYNVISC

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About Knee Osteoarthritis – Causes, Symptoms & Diagnosis …

Knee Osteoarthritis – Physical Therapy – CyberPT

Knee osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the geriatric population (1, 2). Thirty-three percent of persons 63-94 years of age are affected by knee osteoarthritis (1, 2). Pain, impaired mobility, and reduced muscle strength are common findings in patients with OA which can limit activities of daily living (1, 2). Knee osteoarthritis is primarily characterized by cartilage deterioration along with associated ligament tearing, bone calcification and changes in musculature that may cause joint space narrowing (2, 3). Changes to the joint space can cause significant pain, muscle weakness, joint instability and decreased range of motion for these patients (3).

Risk factors for OA include (4): 1. Noted-trauma, immobilization 2. History of joint infection 3. Hemarthrosis 4. High intensity activities marked by repetitive impact and twisting football, soccer, hockey, running, and etc. 5. Occupational Duties- repetitive heavy lifting, kneeling and squatting 6. Muscle weakness, obesity, genetics, nutrition and joint laxity

The first line of defense for OA includes weight loss, physical therapy, and exercise. The second line of defense includes surgery and pharmacologic intervention (5). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are shown to benefit patients, but are associated with major side effects including gastrointestinal complications, kidney damage, and potential fatality (5, 6, 7). Acetaphetamine may also be prescribed to patients since it has less serious side effects, but it is not as effective as NSAIDs (5, 6, 7). Arthroscopic surgeries, knee capsule injections of saline, and tidal irrigation have not been shown to have lasting proven benefits for the patients (1, 5). Exercise, however, has been shown to be the most effective intervention in reducing pain and functional limitation (1). Given the number of obese patients and geriatric patients that have limitations to exercise; a health professional such as a physical therapist is even more further indicated.

Common signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis consist of (4): 1. Onset of symptoms insidiously and progresses slowly 2. Deep ache 3. Aggravation with weight bearing or use of joint 4. Alleviation with rest, decreased weight bearing 5. Mild joint edema 6. Loss of flexibility/mobility/ROM 7. Crepitus with joint motion 8. Palpable osteophytes/bone spurs

Studies have shown that patients can benefit from manual therapy techniques used in combination with joint mobility and strengthening exercise by physical therapists (1,5). Manual therapy can be used for the improvement of elasticity of the joint capsule and the surrounding muscles and strengthening exercises can provide increased stabilization and decreased loading at joint surfaces. The manual therapy treatment techniques, consisting of passive physiologic and accessory joint movements, muscle stretching, soft tissue mobilization are applied to mainly knee joint, and strengthening of hip flexors and extensors, and knee flexors and extensors are typically performed (1,5). Studies found improvements in range of motion (11%), pain (33%), and gait speed (11%) after manual therapy and strengthening exercise (8).

Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Options for a PT Gait Training Postural/Functional Training ROM exercises Stretching (see videos 28 & 30 for hip/groin/knee) Strengthening/Stabilization (see videos 17 & 21 for hip/groin/ knee) Manual Therapy Modalities

Last revised: June 9, 2011 by Minhwan Kim, SPT

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Knee Osteoarthritis – Physical Therapy – CyberPT

How Knee Injections Ease Knee Osteoarthritis Symptoms …

If youre miserable with osteoarthritis symptoms, knee injections may be one treatment your doctor orders. Read on as a leading orthopedist explains what every woman needs to know about relieving joint pain and swelling…

Suffering from pain and swelling in your knee? Put down the over-the-counter painkillers, and make an appointment with your doctor.

If you wait, your knee injury might lead to osteoarthritis symptoms, says Luga Podesta, M.D., a sports medicine specialist at Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles.

See your doctor and get referred to a knee specialist sooner, not later, Dr. Podesta advises. The longer you put up with the pain, the worse the damage will become. And then youre looking at knee-replacement surgery.

Early intervention with newer treatments, such as hyaluronic acid and plasma from your own blood, can prevent further joint deterioration, he says.

There are medications and biologic therapies we can inject into your knee to keep the pain down and keep you active longer, Dr. Podesta says.

In this exclusive Lifescript interview, Dr. Podesta answers questions about knee injections and explains how they reduce knee pain and limit osteoarthritis damage to your joints.

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How Knee Injections Ease Knee Osteoarthritis Symptoms …

Knee Arthritis – Physio Works

Article byJohn Miller

The most common cause of Knee Arthritis is Knee Osteoarthritis (OA).

Knee osteoarthritis is a degenerative knee condition where the articular cartilage of your knee joint gradually wears away, exposing the underlying bone.

As your knee arthritis progresses, bony spurs also develop in and around your knee joint in response to the change in load distribution and biomechanics.

Within your knee there are two joints which can be affected by knee arthritis: the tibiofemoral joint- the joint between your thigh bone (femur) and your lower leg (tibia) and the patellofemoral joint (the joint between the kneecap and the femur itself).

There are several factors which have been found to predispose people to developing osteoarthritis in the knee joints:

As you age it is normal for joint surfaces to wear down, especially the major weight bearing joints of the lower limb. The ability of joint cartilage to repair itself also declines as you grow older.

Your weight will directly affect the amount of load the joints in your lower limb have to support during weight bearing activities.

Previous injury to your knee can change the biomechanics of your knee joint. This leads to abnormal distribution of load through the knee in everyday tasks.

The gene that produces your articular knee cartilage is sometimes defective and can lead to either decreased lay down of cartilage, or normal lay down of defective cartilage on the joint surfaces.

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Knee Arthritis – Physio Works

Cellular Biomedicine begins patient recruitment for cartilage damage stem cell therapy clinical research study

Published 07 January 2015

Cellular Biomedicine Group, a biomedicine firm engaged in the development of effective treatments for degenerative and cancerous diseases, announced the initiation of patient recruitment to support a study of ReJoin human adipose derived mesenchymal progenitor cell (haMPC) therapy for Cartilage Damage (CD) resulting from osteoarthritis (OA) or sports injury.

The study is based on the same science that has shown tremendous progress in the treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA). Both arthroscopy and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be deployed to further demonstrate the regenerative efficacy of ReJoin on CD.

The decision to explore the efficacy of the company’s proprietary ReJoin therapy on an additional orthopedic indication, Cartilage Damage (CD), follows the encouraging data readout from its Knee Osteoarthritis Phase IIa Clinical Trial, of which the twelve-month follow-up results were announced in December 2014.

“We anticipate patient treatment in this study to be completed by the end of Q2 2015, and to report the interim results in Q3 2015. We very much look forward to finding the promise of ReJoinTM therapy for further indications. The repair of damaged cartilage would fundamentally improve the quality of life for CD patients, allowing for greater mobility, flexibility and less pain,” said Dr. William (Wei) Cao, Chief Executive Officer of the Company.

The Phase II clinical study is a single-blind, randomly assigned, controlled clinical research study that will enroll thirty patients with the purpose of evaluating the safety and efficacy of haMPCs combined with lavage, debridement, and/or microfracture under arthroscopy treatment for cartilage damage.

In addition, this study shall serve as a supporting study of ReJoin for the treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA) so as to bring additional clinical data to the protocol of future KOA trials.

The study is conducted by Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, a leading teaching hospital affiliated with Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine. Professor Wang You, Director of the hospital’s orthopedics department and Vice Chairperson of the Chinese Knee Society, will lead the study as Principal Investigator.

Currently in China KOA patients number over 57 million. The incidence of cartilage damage in routine knee arthroscopies has been reported to be almost 300,000 per year. (Source: Market analysis of Chinese arthroscopy, published on July 21, 2014 and “Advances in Orthopedics” Volume 2012, Article ID 528423) Similar to KOA, CD is an unmet orthopedic medical need.

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Cellular Biomedicine begins patient recruitment for cartilage damage stem cell therapy clinical research study

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Treatment (BMAC) for Knee Osteoarthritis – Mayo Clinic – Video



Bone Marrow Stem Cell Treatment (BMAC) for Knee Osteoarthritis – Mayo Clinic
Shane Shapiro, M.D., orthopedic physician at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses a regenerative medicine clinical research trial to treat knee arthritis, which is the bone marrow stem cell treatment…

By: Mayo Clinic

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Bone Marrow Stem Cell Treatment (BMAC) for Knee Osteoarthritis – Mayo Clinic – Video

Actual Surgical Footage of the BMAC for Knee Osteoarthritis Procedure – Mayo Clinic (GRAPHIC video) – Video



Actual Surgical Footage of the BMAC for Knee Osteoarthritis Procedure – Mayo Clinic (GRAPHIC video)
Shane Shapiro, M.D., orthopedic physician at Mayo Clinic in Florida, performS a bone marrow aspiration and concentration for BMAC/stem cell injection into arthritic knees. This procedure is…

By: Mayo Clinic

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Actual Surgical Footage of the BMAC for Knee Osteoarthritis Procedure – Mayo Clinic (GRAPHIC video) – Video

Knee Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Testimonial – Video



Knee Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Testimonial
Knee Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Testimonial. Dr. Dennis Lox uses Stem Cell Treatment with amazing results. Dr. Lox | http://www.drloxstemcells.com | (844) 440-8503.

By: Dr. Lox

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Knee Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Testimonial – Video

Treating Knee Osteoarthritis with Stem Cells – Dr. Ben Newton | Regenexx – Video



Treating Knee Osteoarthritis with Stem Cells – Dr. Ben Newton | Regenexx
Dr. Ben Newton discusses knee osteoarthritis and the use of stem cells for treating this common condition and avoiding knee replacement surgery. Regenexx off…

By: Regenexx

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Treating Knee Osteoarthritis with Stem Cells – Dr. Ben Newton | Regenexx – Video

Vatican Stem Cell Conference Centeno Lecture – Video



Vatican Stem Cell Conference Centeno Lecture
Dr. Christopher Centeno presents his research into the use of stem cells to treat knee osteoarthritis at the Vatican Stem Cell Conference in Rome on 4/12/13.

By: Chris Centeno

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Vatican Stem Cell Conference Centeno Lecture – Video

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